Asexual Association

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<ucd DOT asquared AT gmail DOT com>
Established
2010-01

The Asexual Association (A²) is a closed social/support group for anyone who identifies as asexual, demisexual, grey-asexual, hyposexual, semisexual, or any other identity that may fall under the asexual umbrella. People questioning their a/sexuality are very much welcome. Anyone with any affiliation to Davis is encouraged to attend, from life-long residents to visitors passing through town. Meetings are held in downtown Davis, with times determined at the beginning of each UCD quarter. Though the meetings and listserv are at this time not open to sexual allies, anyone may email the moderator with information that may be of interest to the asexual community.

For other asexual resources, see the [WWW]Asexual Visibility and Education Network (AVEN) and [WWW]Demi Grace for starters. For UC Davis students, the LGBTRC is a friendly, safe space, and programming around asexuality is beginning to be implemented. In fact, check out Asexual Awareness Week in October! There is also a resource binder full of articles and 101-materials in the center itself.

There are many misconceptions about asexual people. Asexual people are not anti-sex or intolerant of sexual people. They are people who simply do not experience sexual attraction. Asexuality is not the same as celibacy. Celibacy is when you choose not to act on your sexual impulses. Asexual people simply do not have sexual attraction to other people.

Asexuality is a sexual orientation that people identify themselves with. Human beings throughout history have identified themselves with many different sexual orientations such as heterosexuality, homosexuality, bisexuality, and asexuality. Asexuality is just as valid as more established and well known sexual orientations. Throughout the years, many people have denied that asexuality is a sexual orientation. Some people mistakenly believe that it is a choice much like how some people believe that homosexuality is a choice. Asexuality is considered to be a sexual orientation that people are born with and that they cannot change who they are. However, there are some psychologists who believe that sexual orientation can be changed through therapy much like how some psychologists claim to be able to cure homosexuality with therapy.

Asexuality is not a disorder. Asexuals do not need psychological treatment nor conversion therapy. Since asexuality as a sexual orientation is quite unpublicized among the general population, asexuality is often met with hostility and ignorance. Some people may claim that asexuality does not exist, or that asexuality can be cured.

Asexuals are not broken and do not need treatment. They are human beings just like everyone else and often do form partnered relationships just like people of other sexual orientations. Asexuals are not sex-negative. In fact, many asexuals are sex-positive and are very open to the fact that we live in a world with people of diverse sexual practices and sexual identities.

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2011-10-19 02:38:53   I am glad that there is a group where asexuals have a safe place to gather and meet other asexuals. Asexuality is often misunderstood. Asexual people often are afraid to speak of their orientation as many people feel that it is not a valid sexual orientation. Misinformed people often attack what they don't understand, and asexual people often have no support system or allies to stand up for them. There is much intolerance against new and different sexual orientations. Very often people refuse to believe that yet another sexual orientation exists and just tell asexuals that they "will grow out of it," or that they should seek out treatment. We all search for a place to belong, and we all want to find others who share common interests. Most of all we want to be who we are without other people trying to get us to change who we are. —MaxLucas

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