Recent Changes for "Bicycle Helmets" - Davis Wikihttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_HelmetsRecent Changes of the page "Bicycle Helmets" on Davis Wiki.en-us Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2010-10-26 08:29:00LoisRichter(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 40: </td> <td> Line 40: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ** From that same article: "New York City released a report on bicycle deaths and injuries: 225 cyclists died between 1996 and 2005 on New York streets; 97 percent of them were not wearing helmets. Of these deaths, 58 percent are known to involve head injury, but the actual number could be as high as 80 percent." Davis isn't New York, of course, and our biking is seldom in direct competition with autos. But it still seems to me that wearing a helmet is safer than not. A helmet may not stop my crashing, but it may save me from head injury. --["Users/LoisRichter"] </td> <td> <span>+ </span> ** From that same article: "New York City released a report on bicycle deaths and injuries: 225 cyclists died between 1996 and 2005 on New York streets; 97 percent of them were not wearing helmets. Of these deaths, 58 percent are known to involve head injury, but the actual number could be as high as 80 percent." Davis isn't New York, of course, and our biking is seldom in direct competition with autos. But it still seems to me that wearing a helmet is safer than not. A helmet may not stop my crashing, but it may save me from head injury. --["Users/LoisRichter"] </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2010-10-26 08:28:25LoisRichter(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 40: </td> <td> Line 40: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ** From that same article: "New York City released a report on bicycle deaths and injuries: 225 cyclists died between 1996 and 2005 on New York streets; 97 percent of them were not wearing helmets. Of these deaths, 58 percent are known to involve head injury, but the actual number could be as high as 80 percent." Davis isn't New York, of course, and our biking is seldom in direct competition with autos. But it still seems to me that wearing a helmet is safer than not. A helmet may not stop my crashing, but it may save me from head injury. --["Users/LoisRichter"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2010-10-26 08:18:58LoisRichter(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 37: </td> <td> Line 37: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ** The biggest difference between walking and biking is that when walking your feet are on the ground and your hands are probably free; while on a bike your hands are gripping the handlebars and the momentum of riding means that if the front wheel stops abruptly YOU will continue in an arc forward and down (being thrown over the handlebars and likely landing on your head). --["Users/LoisRichter"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2010-02-26 23:42:18AlexanderHoComment added. <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 56: </td> <td> Line 56: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ------<br> + ''2010-02-26 23:42:18'' [[nbsp]] I once flipped over forward on my bike. My head bounced around three times on the pavement - I shudder to think what would've happened if I didn't have my helmet on me.<br> + <br> + Best part besides being alive? My bike survived and still works to this day! Compared to my Target bike in freshman year, which crumpled as I was biking uphill one day. --["Users/AlexanderHo"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2009-08-03 16:25:39JabberWokky <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 13: </td> <td> Line 13: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- The [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bicycle_helmet#The_helmet_debate Wikipedia page] on bicycle helmets is a better place to pursue the general debate over bicycle helmets and helmet laws than DavisWiki. (Also, the comments section of a DavisWiki page is a better place for debate points than the main section.)</span> </td> <td> <span>+ It is true that bicycling is about three times as safe per mile of travel than walking in the US, as measured by fatalities ([http://www.vtpi.org/puchertq.pdf Pucher and Dijkstra, 2003]). That makes bicycling less safe per hour, or per trip, because bicycling is about 5 times as fast as walking. Protecting pedestrians and bicyclists are both major public safety challenges that require many partial solutions. Even though helmets are not a good solution for pedestrians, they are an important solution for bicyclists.<br> + <br> + It is also true that the rate of reported head injuries increased from 1991 to 2001 in the United States even though bicycle use fell in the same period ([http://bicycleuniverse.info/eqp/helmets-nyt.html New York Times, July 29, 2001]). A common time trend does not imply cause and effect and it is open to many possible explanations. For instance, doctors may diagnose a type of injury or illness more thoroughly or more liberally over time, so that a problem appears to get worse when it is actually only getting reported more.<br> + <br> + The [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bicycle_helmet#The_helmet_debate Wikipedia page] on bicycle helmets is a better place to pursue the general debate over bicycle helmets and helmet laws than DavisWiki. The comments section of a DavisWiki page is a better place for debating than the main section, then gather them up and put them in the top as cogent points. Of course, since there are no rules -- except that you *must* wear a Wiki helmet when debating on the wiki -- feel free to ignore that.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2009-08-03 14:39:28GregKuperbergRemove and tone down some of my argumentation in the main section <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> '''Bicycle Helmets''' are strongly recommended<span>&nbsp;(by doctors and city and campus officials) for any bicyclist</span> in Davis or anywhere else<span>, as well as</span> legally required in California for bicyclists under the age of 18. Head injuries are the biggest cause of death in fatal bike accidents and a major type of serious injury in non-fatal bike accidents ([http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/people/injury/New-fact-sheet03/BicycleHelmetUse.pdf NHTSA Fact Sheet]). Bicycle helmets prevent most head injuries and lessen many others. Doctors can repair many kinds of damage after a bicycle accident, but they cannot repair brain damage. Even a <span>concussion that does not lead</span> to hospitalization<span>&nbsp;may represent</span> insidious (meaning medically undetected) <span>brain damage; this is a major form of illness for football players, for example.<br> </span>-<span>&nbsp;</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> '''Bicycle Helmets''' are strongly recommended<span>, by doctors and by city and campus officials, for anyone who bicycles</span> in Davis or anywhere else<span>. They are also</span> legally required in California for bicyclists under the age of 18. Head injuries are the biggest cause of death in fatal bike accidents and a major type of serious injury in non-fatal bike accidents ([http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/people/injury/New-fact-sheet03/BicycleHelmetUse.pdf NHTSA Fact Sheet]). Bicycle helmets prevent most head injuries and lessen many others. Doctors can repair many kinds of damage after a bicycle accident, but they cannot repair brain damage. Even a <span>simple concussion is a type of brain injury; whether or not it leads</span> to hospitalization<span>, it may still involve</span> insidious (meaning medically undetected) <span>long</span>-<span>term brain damage.</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 10: </td> <td> Line 9: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- Just as with motorcycle helmets and seat belts, there is some public debate as to whether it is important to wear a bicycle helmet. The scientific consensus, based on both case-control studies and ergonomic theory, is that bicycle helmets are very important, although exactly how important they are and how to best design a helmet are a matter of continuing research ([http://depts.washington.edu/hiprc/practices/topic/bicycles/helmeteffect.html University of Washington Med school review]).<br> - <br> - <br> - It is true that bicycling is about three times as safe per mile of travel than walking in the US, as measured by fatalities ([http://www.vtpi.org/puchertq.pdf Pucher and Dijkstra, 2003]). That makes bicycling less safe per hour, or per trip, because bicycling is about 5 times as fast as walking. Protecting pedestrians and bicyclists are both major public safety challenges that require many partial solutions. Even though helmets are not a good solution for pedestrians, they are an important solution for bicyclists.<br> - <br> - <br> - It is also true that the rate of reported head injuries increased from 1991 to 2001 in the United States even though bicycle use fell in the same period ([http://bicycleuniverse.info/eqp/helmets-nyt.html New York Times, July 29, 2001]). A common time trend does not imply cause and effect and it is open to many possible explanations. For instance, doctors may diagnose a type of injury or illness more thoroughly or more liberally over time, so that a problem appears to get worse when it is actually only getting reported more.<br> - <br> - <br> - </span> </td> <td> <span>+ Just as with motorcycle helmets and seat belts, there is some public debate as to whether it is important to wear a bicycle helmet. The scientific consensus, based on both case-control studies and ergonomic theory, is that bicycle helmets are important. Exactly how important they are and how to best design a helmet are a matter of continuing research ([http://depts.washington.edu/hiprc/practices/topic/bicycles/helmeteffect.html University of Washington Med school review]).</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 23: </td> <td> Line 13: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- <br> -</span> The [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bicycle_helmet#The_helmet_debate Wikipedia page] on bicycle helmets is a better place to pursue general <span>the </span>debate over bicycle helmets and helmet laws than DavisWiki.<span><br> - </span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> The [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bicycle_helmet#The_helmet_debate Wikipedia page] on bicycle helmets is a better place to pursue <span>the </span>general debate over bicycle helmets and helmet laws than DavisWiki.<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;(Also, the comments section of a DavisWiki page is a better place for debate points than the main section.)</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2009-08-02 18:33:19BrettHallAnswer <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 63: </td> <td> Line 63: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * Regular helmets are available in youth sizes. Baby helmets (meeting requirements for ages 1+) are giant bulbous things that aren't ventilated, but the kids wearing them are also not exerting themselves (and need more protection). So basically, when the kid's old enough to be riding a bike instead of being a passenger, there are ventilated helmets to keep the head cool ''and'' protected. Well, cooler, anyway. The BMX style is more popular among certain groups of youths, though. Answering why would require a graduate thesis. --["Users/BrettHall"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2009-08-02 13:11:30IDoNotExistComment added. <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 61: </td> <td> Line 61: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ------<br> + ''2009-08-02 14:11:30'' [[nbsp]] So do they make regular, ventilated helmets in kids sizes too, or do the kids just have the BMX style helmets available? --["Users/IDoNotExist"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2009-08-02 12:12:45BrettHallBMX vs. skateboard helmets <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 60: </td> <td> Line 60: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * More often they are BMX helmets. Skateboarding helmets are designed for extremely low-impact, repeated collisions, and do not meet CPSC requirements for bicycle helmets (they spread the impact, rather than absorbing it). BMX helmets look similar to skateboarding helmets from the outside, but include the same crushable closed-cell foam found in 'regular' bike helmets. The law requires riders under the age of 18 to wear a CPSC-approved helmet. And yes, BMX helmets have little ventilation compared to other styles. --["Users/BrettHall"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2009-08-02 11:35:34WilliamLewis(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 59: </td> <td> Line 59: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ The solid-ish helmets are skateboarding helmets. They're fashionable for one reason or another, despite the fact that they suck. --["wl"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2009-08-02 11:17:21IDoNotExistComment added. <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 57: </td> <td> Line 57: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ------<br> + ''2009-08-02 12:17:21'' [[nbsp]] I've noticed that the students around Davis (18 and younger, not the students at UCD) wear helmets that are solid, almost spherical, appear to be made of metal or a hard plastic, and have no ventilation. Everyone over 18 wears styrofoam helmets. Anyone know why the kids are wearing different helmets than the adults? Is there a law about this? Do they offer more protection? It doesn't seem like it would be much fun to wear a helmet with no ventilation in the Davis summer heat... --["Users/IDoNotExist"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2008-12-07 16:49:22GregKuperberg(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 21: </td> <td> Line 21: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Much of the debate is about bicycle helmet laws rather than about the merit of helmets. There is a libertarian argument that laws should not unduly protect people from themselves. This is one reason that bicycle helmets are not generally required for adults in the United States, and it is part of a continuing debate over motorcycle helmet laws. <span>But f</span>ew people would argue that children should not be protected from themselves, and that is why bicycle helmets are required for children in California. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Much of the debate is about bicycle helmet laws rather than about the merit of helmets. There is a libertarian argument that laws should not unduly protect people from themselves. This is one reason that bicycle helmets are not generally required for adults in the United States, and it is part of a continuing debate over motorcycle helmet laws. <span>F</span>ew people would argue that children should not be protected from themselves, and that is why bicycle helmets are required for children in California.<span><br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2008-12-06 23:09:11GregKuperberg(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 16: </td> <td> Line 16: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> It is also true that the rate of reported head injuries increased from 1991 to 2001 in the United States even though bicycle use fell in the same period ([http://bicycleuniverse.info/eqp/helmets-nyt.html New York Times, July 29, 2001]). A common time trend does not imply cause and effect and it is open to many possible explanations. For instance, doctors may diagnose a type of injury or illness more thoroughly or more liberally over time, so that a problem <span>looks like it is</span> get<span>tin</span>g<span>&nbsp;worse when actually it is only more likely to be reported</span>. </td> <td> <span>+</span> It is also true that the rate of reported head injuries increased from 1991 to 2001 in the United States even though bicycle use fell in the same period ([http://bicycleuniverse.info/eqp/helmets-nyt.html New York Times, July 29, 2001]). A common time trend does not imply cause and effect and it is open to many possible explanations. For instance, doctors may diagnose a type of injury or illness more thoroughly or more liberally over time, so that a problem <span>appears to</span> get<span>&nbsp;worse when it is actually only </span>g<span>etting reported more</span>.<span><br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2008-12-06 23:07:29GregKuperberg(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 16: </td> <td> Line 16: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- It is also true that the rate of reported head injuries increased from 1991 to 2001 in the United States even though bicycle use fell in the same period ([http://bicycleuniverse.info/eqp/helmets-nyt.html New York Times, July 29, 2001]). However, a common time trend does not imply cause and effect and it is open to many possible explanations. For instance, doctors may diagnose a type of injury or illness more thoroughly or more liberally over time, so that a problem looks like it is getting worse when actually it is only more likely to be reported.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ It is also true that the rate of reported head injuries increased from 1991 to 2001 in the United States even though bicycle use fell in the same period ([http://bicycleuniverse.info/eqp/helmets-nyt.html New York Times, July 29, 2001]). A common time trend does not imply cause and effect and it is open to many possible explanations. For instance, doctors may diagnose a type of injury or illness more thoroughly or more liberally over time, so that a problem looks like it is getting worse when actually it is only more likely to be reported.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2008-12-06 23:06:58GregKuperberg(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 13: </td> <td> Line 13: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> It is true that bicycling is about three times as safe per mile of travel than walking in the US, as measured by fatalities ([http://www.vtpi.org/puchertq.pdf Pucher and Dijkstra, 2003]). <span>However, t</span>hat makes <span>it</span> less safe per hour, or per trip, because bicycling is about 5 times as fast as walking. Protecting pedestrians and bicyclists are both major public safety challenges that require many partial solutions. Even though helmets are not a good solution for pedestrians, they are an important solution for bicyclists. </td> <td> <span>+</span> It is true that bicycling is about three times as safe per mile of travel than walking in the US, as measured by fatalities ([http://www.vtpi.org/puchertq.pdf Pucher and Dijkstra, 2003]). <span>T</span>hat makes <span>bicycling</span> less safe per hour, or per trip, because bicycling is about 5 times as fast as walking. Protecting pedestrians and bicyclists are both major public safety challenges that require many partial solutions. Even though helmets are not a good solution for pedestrians, they are an important solution for bicyclists. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2008-12-06 23:06:34GregKuperberg(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 10: </td> <td> Line 10: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- Just as with motorcycle helmets and seat belts, there is some public debate as to whether it is important to wear a bicycle helmet. The scientific consensus, based on both case-control studies and ergonomic theory, is that bicycle helmets are very important, although how important they are and how to best design a helmet are a matter of continuing research ([http://depts.washington.edu/hiprc/practices/topic/bicycles/helmeteffect.html University of Washington Med school review]).</span> </td> <td> <span>+ Just as with motorcycle helmets and seat belts, there is some public debate as to whether it is important to wear a bicycle helmet. The scientific consensus, based on both case-control studies and ergonomic theory, is that bicycle helmets are very important, although exactly how important they are and how to best design a helmet are a matter of continuing research ([http://depts.washington.edu/hiprc/practices/topic/bicycles/helmeteffect.html University of Washington Med school review]).</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2008-12-06 23:03:49GregKuperberg(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 10: </td> <td> Line 10: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Just as with motorcycle helmets and seat belts, there is some public debate as to whether it is important to wear a bicycle helmet. The scientific consensus, based on both case-control studies and ergonomic theory, is that bicycle helmets are very important, although how important they are and how to best design a helmet are a matter of continuing research ([http://depts.washington.edu/hiprc/practices/topic/bicycles/helmeteffect.html University of Washington <span>medical center</span> review]). </td> <td> <span>+</span> Just as with motorcycle helmets and seat belts, there is some public debate as to whether it is important to wear a bicycle helmet. The scientific consensus, based on both case-control studies and ergonomic theory, is that bicycle helmets are very important, although how important they are and how to best design a helmet are a matter of continuing research ([http://depts.washington.edu/hiprc/practices/topic/bicycles/helmeteffect.html University of Washington <span>Med school</span> review]).<span><br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2008-12-06 23:02:49GregKuperberg(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 19: </td> <td> Line 19: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Much of the <span>rational </span>debate is about bicycle helmet laws rather than about the merit of helmets. There is a libertarian argument that laws should not unduly protect people from themselves. This is one reason that bicycle helmets are not generally required for adults in the United States, and it is part of a continuing debate over motorcycle helmet laws. But few people would argue that children should not be protected from themselves, and that is why bicycle helmets are required for children in California. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Much of the debate is about bicycle helmet laws rather than about the merit of helmets. There is a libertarian argument that laws should not unduly protect people from themselves. This is one reason that bicycle helmets are not generally required for adults in the United States, and it is part of a continuing debate over motorcycle helmet laws. But few people would argue that children should not be protected from themselves, and that is why bicycle helmets are required for children in California. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2008-12-06 23:02:42GregKuperberg(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 15: </td> <td> Line 15: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> It is also true that the rate of reported head injuries increased from 1991 to 2001 in the United States even though bicycle use fell in the same period ([http://bicycleuniverse.info/eqp/helmets-nyt.html New York Times, July 29, 2001]). However, <span>this is not a case-controlled relationship and it is open to many</span> explanations. For instance, doctors may diagnose a type of injury or illness more thoroughly or more liberally over time, so that a problem looks like it is getting worse when actually it is only more likely to be reported. </td> <td> <span>+</span> It is also true that the rate of reported head injuries increased from 1991 to 2001 in the United States even though bicycle use fell in the same period ([http://bicycleuniverse.info/eqp/helmets-nyt.html New York Times, July 29, 2001]). However, <span>a common time trend does not imply cause and effect and it is open to many possible</span> explanations. For instance, doctors may diagnose a type of injury or illness more thoroughly or more liberally over time, so that a problem looks like it is getting worse when actually it is only more likely to be reported.<span><br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2008-12-06 23:01:37GregKuperberg(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 10: </td> <td> Line 10: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- Just as with motorcycle helmets and seat belts, there is some public debate as to how important it is to wear a bicycle helmet.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ Just as with motorcycle helmets and seat belts, there is some public debate as to whether it is important to wear a bicycle helmet. The scientific consensus, based on both case-control studies and ergonomic theory, is that bicycle helmets are very important, although how important they are and how to best design a helmet are a matter of continuing research ([http://depts.washington.edu/hiprc/practices/topic/bicycles/helmeteffect.html University of Washington medical center review]).</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2008-12-06 22:56:11GregKuperberg(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 12: </td> <td> Line 12: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> It is true that bicycling is about three times as safe per mile of travel than walking in the US, as measured by fatalities ([http://www.vtpi.org/puchertq.pdf Pucher and Dijkstra, 2003]). However, that makes it less safe per hour, or per trip, because bicycling is about 5 times as fast as walking. <span>(The space shuttle is also fairly safe per mile of travel, but it is not safe per hour or per trip.) </span>Protecting pedestrians and bicyclists are both major public safety challenges that require many partial solutions. Even though helmets are not a good solution for pedestrians, they are an important solution for bicyclists. </td> <td> <span>+</span> It is true that bicycling is about three times as safe per mile of travel than walking in the US, as measured by fatalities ([http://www.vtpi.org/puchertq.pdf Pucher and Dijkstra, 2003]). However, that makes it less safe per hour, or per trip, because bicycling is about 5 times as fast as walking. Protecting pedestrians and bicyclists are both major public safety challenges that require many partial solutions. Even though helmets are not a good solution for pedestrians, they are an important solution for bicyclists. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2008-12-06 21:10:11JeffShawcomment <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 50: </td> <td> Line 50: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * Have you watched Nascar lately? Makes me scared to step inside a car!--["Users/JeffShaw"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2008-12-06 19:58:03GregKuperberg(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 12: </td> <td> Line 12: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> It is true that bicycling is about three times as safe per mile of travel than walking in the US, as measured by fatalities ([http://www.vtpi.org/puchertq.pdf Pucher and Dijkstra, 2003]). However, that makes it less safe per hour, or per trip, because bicycling is about 5 times as fast as walking. (The space shuttle is also fairly safe per mile of travel, but it is not safe per hour or per trip.) Protecting pedestrians and bicyclists are both major public safety challenges that <span>have led to</span> many partial solutions. Even though helmets are not a good solution for pedestrians, they are an important solution for bicyclists. </td> <td> <span>+</span> It is true that bicycling is about three times as safe per mile of travel than walking in the US, as measured by fatalities ([http://www.vtpi.org/puchertq.pdf Pucher and Dijkstra, 2003]). However, that makes it less safe per hour, or per trip, because bicycling is about 5 times as fast as walking. (The space shuttle is also fairly safe per mile of travel, but it is not safe per hour or per trip.) Protecting pedestrians and bicyclists are both major public safety challenges that <span>require</span> many partial solutions. Even though helmets are not a good solution for pedestrians, they are an important solution for bicyclists. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2008-12-06 19:56:28GregKuperberg(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> '''Bicycle Helmets''' are strongly recommended (by doctors and city and campus officials) for any bicyclist in Davis or anywhere else, as well as legally required in California for bicyclists under the age of 18. Head injuries are the biggest cause of death in fatal bi<span>cycl</span>e accidents and a major <span>caus</span>e of serious injur<span>ies</span> in non-fatal bi<span>cycl</span>e accidents ([http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/people/injury/New-fact-sheet03/BicycleHelmetUse.pdf NHTSA Fact Sheet]). Bicycle helmets prevent most head injuries and lessen many others. Doctors can repair many kinds of damage after a bicycle accident, but they cannot repair brain damage. Even a concussion that does not lead to hospitalization may represent insidious (meaning medically undetected) brain damage; this is a major form of illness for football players, for example. </td> <td> <span>+</span> '''Bicycle Helmets''' are strongly recommended (by doctors and city and campus officials) for any bicyclist in Davis or anywhere else, as well as legally required in California for bicyclists under the age of 18. Head injuries are the biggest cause of death in fatal bi<span>k</span>e accidents and a major <span>typ</span>e of serious injur<span>y</span> in non-fatal bi<span>k</span>e accidents ([http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/people/injury/New-fact-sheet03/BicycleHelmetUse.pdf NHTSA Fact Sheet]). Bicycle helmets prevent most head injuries and lessen many others. Doctors can repair many kinds of damage after a bicycle accident, but they cannot repair brain damage. Even a concussion that does not lead to hospitalization may represent insidious (meaning medically undetected) brain damage; this is a major form of illness for football players, for example. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2008-12-06 19:55:45GregKuperberg(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> '''Bicycle Helmets''' are strongly recommended for any bicyclist in Davis or anywhere else, as well as legally required in California for bicyclists under the age of 18. Head injuries are the biggest cause of death in fatal bicycle accidents and a major cause of serious injuries in non-fatal bicycle accidents ([http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/people/injury/New-fact-sheet03/BicycleHelmetUse.pdf NHTSA Fact Sheet]). Bicycle helmets prevent most head injuries and lessen many others. Doctors can repair many kinds of damage after a bicycle accident, but they cannot repair brain damage. Even a concussion that does not lead to hospitalization may represent insidious (meaning medically undetected) brain damage; this is a major form of illness for football players, for example. </td> <td> <span>+</span> '''Bicycle Helmets''' are strongly recommended<span>&nbsp;(by doctors and city and campus officials)</span> for any bicyclist in Davis or anywhere else, as well as legally required in California for bicyclists under the age of 18. Head injuries are the biggest cause of death in fatal bicycle accidents and a major cause of serious injuries in non-fatal bicycle accidents ([http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/people/injury/New-fact-sheet03/BicycleHelmetUse.pdf NHTSA Fact Sheet]). Bicycle helmets prevent most head injuries and lessen many others. Doctors can repair many kinds of damage after a bicycle accident, but they cannot repair brain damage. Even a concussion that does not lead to hospitalization may represent insidious (meaning medically undetected) brain damage; this is a major form of illness for football players, for example.<span><br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2008-12-06 19:54:44GregKuperberg(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 19: </td> <td> Line 19: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> The [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bicycle_helmet#The_helmet_debate Wikipedia page] on bicycle helmets is a better place to pursue the debate over bicycle helmets and helmet laws. </td> <td> <span>+</span> The [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bicycle_helmet#The_helmet_debate Wikipedia page] on bicycle helmets is a better place to pursue <span>general </span>the debate over bicycle helmets and helmet laws<span>&nbsp;than DavisWiki</span>.<span><br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2008-12-06 19:53:37GregKuperberg(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 14: </td> <td> Line 14: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> It is also true that the rate of reported head injuries increased from 1991 to 2001 in the United States even though bicycle use fell in the same period ([http://bicycleuniverse.info/eqp/helmets-nyt.html New York Times, July 29, 2001]). However, this is not a case-controlled relationship and it is open to many explanations. For instance, doctors <span>can </span>be<span>come more thorou</span>g<span>h or more li</span>be<span>ral in diagnosing injuries and illnesses over time; this phenomenon has been implicated in many perceived increases in health hazards</span>. </td> <td> <span>+</span> It is also true that the rate of reported head injuries increased from 1991 to 2001 in the United States even though bicycle use fell in the same period ([http://bicycleuniverse.info/eqp/helmets-nyt.html New York Times, July 29, 2001]). However, this is not a case-controlled relationship and it is open to many explanations. For instance, doctors <span>may diagnose a type of injury or illness more thoroughly or more li</span>be<span>rally over time, so that a problem looks like it is </span>g<span>etting worse when actually it is only more likely to </span>be<span>&nbsp;reported</span>.<span><br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2008-12-06 19:49:40GregKuperberg(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 11: </td> <td> Line 11: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> It is true that bicycling is about three times as safe per mile of travel than walking in the US, as measured by fatalities ([http://www.vtpi.org/puchertq.pdf Pucher and Dijkstra, 2003]). However, that makes it less safe per hour, or per trip, because bicycling is about 5 times as fast as walking. (The space shuttle is also fairly safe per mile of travel, but it is not safe per hour or per trip.) Protecting pedestrians and bicyclists are both major public safety challenges<span>; e</span>ve<span>n though helmets are not the right</span> solution for pedestrians, they are an important solution for bicyclists. </td> <td> <span>+</span> It is true that bicycling is about three times as safe per mile of travel than walking in the US, as measured by fatalities ([http://www.vtpi.org/puchertq.pdf Pucher and Dijkstra, 2003]). However, that makes it less safe per hour, or per trip, because bicycling is about 5 times as fast as walking. (The space shuttle is also fairly safe per mile of travel, but it is not safe per hour or per trip.) Protecting pedestrians and bicyclists are both major public safety challenges<span>&nbsp;that ha</span>ve<span>&nbsp;led to many partial solutions. Even though helmets are not a good</span> solution for pedestrians, they are an important solution for bicyclists.<span><br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2008-12-06 19:49:15GregKuperberg(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 8: </td> <td> Line 8: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + Just as with motorcycle helmets and seat belts, there is some public debate as to how important it is to wear a bicycle helmet.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2008-12-06 18:54:07GregKuperbergMissing divider lines in comments <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 25: </td> <td> Line 25: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ -----</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 28: </td> <td> Line 29: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ -----</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2008-12-06 18:51:58GregKuperberg(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 7: </td> <td> Line 7: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- == The debate over helmet use and helmet laws ==</span> </td> <td> <span>+ == The helmet debate ==</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2008-12-06 18:51:41GregKuperberg(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> '''Bicycle Helmets''' are strongly recommended for any bicyclist in Davis or anywhere, as well as legally required for bicyclists under the age of 18. Head injuries are the biggest cause of death in fatal bicycle accidents and a major cause of serious injuries in non-fatal bicycle accidents ([http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/people/injury/New-fact-sheet03/BicycleHelmetUse.pdf NHTSA Fact Sheet]). Bicycle helmets prevent most head injuries and lessen many others. Doctors can repair many kinds of damage after a bicycle accident, but they cannot repair brain damage. Even a concussion that does not lead to hospitalization may represent insidious (meaning medically undetected) brain damage; this is a major form of illness for football players, for example. </td> <td> <span>+</span> '''Bicycle Helmets''' are strongly recommended for any bicyclist in Davis or anywhere<span>&nbsp;else</span>, as well as legally required<span>&nbsp;in California</span> for bicyclists under the age of 18. Head injuries are the biggest cause of death in fatal bicycle accidents and a major cause of serious injuries in non-fatal bicycle accidents ([http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/people/injury/New-fact-sheet03/BicycleHelmetUse.pdf NHTSA Fact Sheet]). Bicycle helmets prevent most head injuries and lessen many others. Doctors can repair many kinds of damage after a bicycle accident, but they cannot repair brain damage. Even a concussion that does not lead to hospitalization may represent insidious (meaning medically undetected) brain damage; this is a major form of illness for football players, for example. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2008-12-06 18:48:42GregKuperbergReplaced misinformation by standard conclusions and reference to Wikipedia page <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- '''Bicycle Helmets''' are the subject of some debate as to whether they're worth wearing.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ '''Bicycle Helmets''' are strongly recommended for any bicyclist in Davis or anywhere, as well as legally required for bicyclists under the age of 18. Head injuries are the biggest cause of death in fatal bicycle accidents and a major cause of serious injuries in non-fatal bicycle accidents ([http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/people/injury/New-fact-sheet03/BicycleHelmetUse.pdf NHTSA Fact Sheet]). Bicycle helmets prevent most head injuries and lessen many others. Doctors can repair many kinds of damage after a bicycle accident, but they cannot repair brain damage. Even a concussion that does not lead to hospitalization may represent insidious (meaning medically undetected) brain damage; this is a major form of illness for football players, for example.</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 5: </td> <td> Line 5: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- == Cycling is less dangerous than walking ==<br> - On a per-kilometer and per-hour basis, cycling has been shown to be less dangerous than walking (see the comments section for links that support this claim). Since pedestrians don't wear helmets, it makes no more sense for cyclists to wear helmets.<br> - * '''Response''': If walking is no more dangerous than cycling, then it must follow that accidents at 15 mph (the campus speed limit) are no more dangerous than accidents at 5 mph. Or, accidents at 15 mph are no more likely to cause traumatic head injuries than accidents at 5 mph. Many feel that the increased speed of cycling merits strapping on a helmet.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ Make sure that your bicycle helmet is in good condition. Throw the helmet away if it is damaged in an accident, or if it is weathered; replace it at least every five years. Sizing the helmet and adjusting the straps are tricky but important steps; the helmet and strap should be snug without feeling tight.</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 9: </td> <td> Line 7: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- == Head injuries increases with helmet use ==</span> </td> <td> <span>+ == The debate over helmet use and helmet laws ==</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 11: </td> <td> Line 9: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- Those wearing helmets are more likely to suffer a traumatic head injury than those who do not wear helmets (see the comments section for links that allegedly support this claim). Helmets may give a person a sense of security, encouraging riskier behavior.<br> - * '''Response''': There is no reason to believe that cause and effect have to do with this observation. Cyclists who ride faster or in more difficult/dangerous circumstances may be much more likely to wear helmets, because they perceive they're more at risk for head injuries.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ It is true that bicycling is about three times as safe per mile of travel than walking in the US, as measured by fatalities ([http://www.vtpi.org/puchertq.pdf Pucher and Dijkstra, 2003]). However, that makes it less safe per hour, or per trip, because bicycling is about 5 times as fast as walking. (The space shuttle is also fairly safe per mile of travel, but it is not safe per hour or per trip.) Protecting pedestrians and bicyclists are both major public safety challenges; even though helmets are not the right solution for pedestrians, they are an important solution for bicyclists.</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 14: </td> <td> Line 11: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- == Helmets are only for professors ==</span> </td> <td> <span>+ It is also true that the rate of reported head injuries increased from 1991 to 2001 in the United States even though bicycle use fell in the same period ([http://bicycleuniverse.info/eqp/helmets-nyt.html New York Times, July 29, 2001]). However, this is not a case-controlled relationship and it is open to many explanations. For instance, doctors can become more thorough or more liberal in diagnosing injuries and illnesses over time; this phenomenon has been implicated in many perceived increases in health hazards.</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 16: </td> <td> Line 13: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- ''2007-10-26 15:01:16'' [[nbsp]] Bicycle helmets are only for professors. They have so much invested in that noggin, it's actually worth protecting. Otherwise, bike helmets aren't cool. --["Users/BrentLaabs"]<br> - * Notwithstanding many professors are still wearing the same helmets they had 10 or 20 years ago, which have long since deteriorated to the point of uselessness. Which brings me to my next point: helmet standards were improved in 1999, and every helmet manufacturer recommends replacing a helmet every 3-4 years or after an impact, whichever comes first. The foam becomes brittle, so instead of crushing like it's designed to, it simply transmits the force directly into your skull. The paramedics will NOT thank you for using an old helmet if you crash. --["Users/BrettHall"]</span> </td> <td> <span>+ Much of the rational debate is about bicycle helmet laws rather than about the merit of helmets. There is a libertarian argument that laws should not unduly protect people from themselves. This is one reason that bicycle helmets are not generally required for adults in the United States, and it is part of a continuing debate over motorcycle helmet laws. But few people would argue that children should not be protected from themselves, and that is why bicycle helmets are required for children in California.</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 19: </td> <td> Line 15: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- == Testimontials ==</span> </td> <td> <span>+ The [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bicycle_helmet#The_helmet_debate Wikipedia page] on bicycle helmets is a better place to pursue the debate over bicycle helmets and helmet laws.<br> + <br> + [[Comments()]]<br> + <br> + (undated) These testimonials have been moved to the comments section.<br> + </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 24: </td> <td> Line 25: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- [[Comments()]]</span> </td> <td> <span>+ ''2007-10-26 15:01:16'' [[nbsp]] Bicycle helmets are only for professors. They have so much invested in that noggin, it's actually worth protecting. Otherwise, bike helmets aren't cool. --["Users/BrentLaabs"]<br> + * Notwithstanding many professors are still wearing the same helmets they had 10 or 20 years ago, which have long since deteriorated to the point of uselessness. Which brings me to my next point: helmet standards were improved in 1999, and every helmet manufacturer recommends replacing a helmet every 3-4 years or after an impact, whichever comes first. The foam becomes brittle, so instead of crushing like it's designed to, it simply transmits the force directly into your skull. The paramedics will NOT thank you for using an old helmet if you crash. --["Users/BrettHall"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2007-11-09 22:53:18WilliamLewisRevert to version 18 (debate can be found in many other places besides wp and here.). <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> '''Bicycle Helmets''' are<span>, at least on this wiki,</span> the subject of some debate as to whether they're worth wearing. </td> <td> <span>+</span> '''Bicycle Helmets''' are the subject of some debate as to whether they're worth wearing. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2007-11-09 22:40:00KaiTingRevert to version 17 ("this wiki" doesn't refer to wikipedia ...). <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> '''Bicycle Helmets''' are the subject of some debate as to whether they're worth wearing. </td> <td> <span>+</span> '''Bicycle Helmets''' are<span>, at least on this wiki,</span> the subject of some debate as to whether they're worth wearing. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2007-11-05 11:55:40EdWinsthe wikipedia page is chock full of debate. <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> '''Bicycle Helmets''' are<span>, at least on this wiki,</span> the subject of some debate as to whether they're worth wearing. </td> <td> <span>+</span> '''Bicycle Helmets''' are the subject of some debate as to whether they're worth wearing. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2007-11-05 11:19:17DougWalterobservation is only part of testing hypotheses <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 12: </td> <td> Line 12: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * '''Response''': There is no reason to believe that cause and effect have to do with this observation. Cyclists who ride faster or in more difficult/dangerous circumstances may be much more likely to wear helmets, because they perceive they're more at risk for head injuries.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2007-11-04 22:13:54KaiTing <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 7: </td> <td> Line 7: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * '''Response''': If walking is no more dangerous than cycling, then it must follow that accidents at 15 mph (the campus speed limit) are no more dangerous than accidents at 5 mph. Or, accidents at 15 mph <span>or</span> no more likely to cause traumatic head injury <span>than accidents at 5 mph</span>.<span>&nbsp;Many feel that the increased speed (and increased risk) of cycling merits strapping on a helmet.</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> * '''Response''': If walking is no more dangerous than cycling, then it must follow that accidents at 15 mph (the campus speed limit) are no more dangerous than accidents at 5 mph. Or, accidents at 15 mph <span>are</span> no more likely to cause traumatic head injur<span>ies than accidents at 5 mph. Man</span>y <span>feel that the increased speed of cycling merits strapping on a helmet</span>. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2007-11-04 21:58:43KaiTing <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 6: </td> <td> Line 6: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- There are more traumatic head injuries due to walking than biking (see the comments section for links that allegedly support this claim). Since pedestrians don't wear helmets, it makes no more sense for cyclists to wear helmets.<br> - <br> - * '''Response''': This logic doesn't work because there are more pedestrians than cyclists. Since nearly everyone walks around on a daily basis, and not nearly as many people ride bikes, it makes sense that there are statistically more traumatic head injuries to pedestrians. However, this does not mean that cycling is less dangerous. By the same logic employed here, you could say that cliff diving is no more dangerous that walking, since more people injure themselves walking than jumping off cliffs. However, cliff diving is obviously more dangerous.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ On a per-kilometer and per-hour basis, cycling has been shown to be less dangerous than walking (see the comments section for links that support this claim). Since pedestrians don't wear helmets, it makes no more sense for cyclists to wear helmets.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2007-11-04 21:54:57KaiTing <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 31: </td> <td> Line 31: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- <br> - ------<br> - ''2007-11-03 22:23:32'' [[nbsp]] Brett Hall said: "</span>it can help immensely if you hit another cyclist, or if you cause yourself to fall and your head hits an object more solid than your skull<span>."<br> - <br> - *</span> True, but the risk of becoming involved in such an accident and incurring a serious head injury is fantastically low. According to the US center for disease control and prevention, less than 1% of traumatic head injuries result from riding bikes. Given such an incredibly low risk, why should one wear a helmet, even if helmets are effective? Walking is just as dangerous as biking (if not more so), and helmets could undoubtedly also mitigate injuries resulting from walking, but would you wear a helmet each time you stroll through your neighborhood?<br> -<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;- *</span> "<span>you'll need a much better anti-helmet argument than '</span>it won't save you if your life is on the line<span>'</span>": That was only part of my argument. Did you overlook the part where I said that the rate of head injuries has gone up as the rate of helmet use has increased? Did you click on the links I provided? The one leading to the bike helmet FAQ should have been particularly informative.<br> <span>- <br> -</span> * <span>"</span>helmets CAN and DO prevent serious injuries<span>"</span>: Helmets can also give their wearers a false sense of security which can increase the risk of injury. This is known as "risk compensation" and it may be one of the reasons why widespread helmet use has done nothing to lessen bike-related injuries. Another form of risk compensation may also occur as a result of wearing a helmet: according to a recent study, car drivers tend to drive less cautiously around helmet-wearing cyclists. (http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?chanID=sa029&amp;articleID=778EF0AB-E7F2-99DF-3594A60E4D9A76B2) </td> <td> <span>+ * '''</span>it can help immensely if you hit another cyclist, or if you cause yourself to fall and your head hits an object more solid than your skull<span>''':</span> True, but the risk of becoming involved in such an accident and incurring a serious head injury is fantastically low. According to the US center for disease control and prevention, less than 1% of traumatic head injuries result from riding bikes. Given such an incredibly low risk, why should one wear a helmet, even if helmets are effective? Walking is just as dangerous as biking (if not more so), and helmets could undoubtedly also mitigate injuries resulting from walking, but would you wear a helmet each time you stroll through your neighborhood?<br> <span>+ * '''you'll need a much better anti</span>-<span>helmet argument than</span> "it won't save you if your life is on the line"<span>'''</span>: That was only part of my argument. Did you overlook the part where I said that the rate of head injuries has gone up as the rate of helmet use has increased? Did you click on the links I provided? The one leading to the bike helmet FAQ should have been particularly informative.<br> <span>+ </span> * <span>'''</span>helmets CAN and DO prevent serious injuries<span>'''</span>: Helmets can also give their wearers a false sense of security which can increase the risk of injury. This is known as "risk compensation" and it may be one of the reasons why widespread helmet use has done nothing to lessen bike-related injuries. Another form of risk compensation may also occur as a result of wearing a helmet: according to a recent study, car drivers tend to drive less cautiously around helmet-wearing cyclists. (http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?chanID=sa029&amp;articleID=778EF0AB-E7F2-99DF-3594A60E4D9A76B2) </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2007-11-04 21:51:36KaiTing <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 35: </td> <td> Line 35: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> True, but the risk of becoming involved in such an accident and incurring a serious head injury is fantastically low. According to the US center for disease control and prevention, less than 1% of traumatic head injuries result from riding bikes. Given such an incredibly low risk, why should one wear a helmet, even if helmets are effective? Walking is just as dangerous as biking (if not more so), and helmets could undoubtedly also mitigate injuries resulting from walking, but would you wear a helmet each time you stroll through your neighborhood? </td> <td> <span>+ *</span> True, but the risk of becoming involved in such an accident and incurring a serious head injury is fantastically low. According to the US center for disease control and prevention, less than 1% of traumatic head injuries result from riding bikes. Given such an incredibly low risk, why should one wear a helmet, even if helmets are effective? Walking is just as dangerous as biking (if not more so), and helmets could undoubtedly also mitigate injuries resulting from walking, but would you wear a helmet each time you stroll through your neighborhood? </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 37: </td> <td> Line 37: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- BH:"you'll need a much better anti-helmet argument than "it won't save you if your life is on the line"</span> </td> <td> <span>+ * "you'll need a much better anti-helmet argument than 'it won't save you if your life is on the line'": That was only part of my argument. Did you overlook the part where I said that the rate of head injuries has gone up as the rate of helmet use has increased? Did you click on the links I provided? The one leading to the bike helmet FAQ should have been particularly informative.</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 39: </td> <td> Line 39: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- That was only part of my argument. Did you overlook the part where I said that the rate of head injuries has gone up as the rate of helmet use has increased? Did you click on the links I provided? The one leading to the bike helmet FAQ should have been particularly informative.<br> - <br> - <br> - BH:</span> "helmets CAN and DO prevent serious injuries"<span><br> - <br> -</span> Helmets can also give their wearers a false sense of security which can increase the risk of injury. This is known as "risk compensation" and it may be one of the reasons why widespread helmet use has done nothing to lessen bike-related injuries. Another form of risk compensation may also occur as a result of wearing a helmet: according to a recent study, car drivers tend to drive less cautiously around helmet-wearing cyclists. (http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?chanID=sa029&amp;articleID=778EF0AB-E7F2-99DF-3594A60E4D9A76B2)<br> <span>- </span> </td> <td> <span>+ *</span> "helmets CAN and DO prevent serious injuries"<span>:</span> Helmets can also give their wearers a false sense of security which can increase the risk of injury. This is known as "risk compensation" and it may be one of the reasons why widespread helmet use has done nothing to lessen bike-related injuries. Another form of risk compensation may also occur as a result of wearing a helmet: according to a recent study, car drivers tend to drive less cautiously around helmet-wearing cyclists. (http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?chanID=sa029&amp;articleID=778EF0AB-E7F2-99DF-3594A60E4D9A76B2)<br> <span>+ ------</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 47: </td> <td> Line 42: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- </span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 49: </td> <td> Line 43: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- </span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 51: </td> <td> Line 44: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- </span> </td> <td> <span>+ ------</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 53: </td> <td> Line 46: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- </span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 55: </td> <td> Line 47: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- </span> </td> <td> <span>+ ------</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 57: </td> <td> Line 49: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- <br> - <br> - [[Include(Seed)]]</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2007-11-04 21:49:37KaiTing <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 19: </td> <td> Line 19: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- * Right on ["Users/BrettHall"] and ["Users/KaiTing"]! I have had but two encounters with cars in over 25 years of riding in Davis. In the latter, on 10/30/07, my helmet broke when it smashed into someone's windshield -- probably saving me from a bad concussion and possibly saving my life! In the former, I was caught by someone's car door and left much of my forehead skin on G Street. (That might have been the last time I rode without a helmet!) Okay, neither accident happened on campus, but they have curbs, bollards &amp; other noggin-mushing objects there too. Bicycle helmets are only for people who want to live with intelligence -- if you don't mind a significantly higher chance of traumatic brain injury, don't worry your pretty little head about one. (That's an attempt at grim cynicism!) -- ["Users/DougWalter"]<br> - * Given that I've received a concussion from a solo bike crash while I was wearing a helmet, I fully support the wearing of helmets to mitigate head injuries. The idea of not wearing a helmet just seems absurdly stupid to me, especially if the reasoning is 'because it looks stupid' or 'because I feel stupid.' You could end up a lot more stupid if you crash while not wearing a helmet. --["Users/BrettHall"]</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 24: </td> <td> Line 22: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * I have had but two encounters with cars in over 25 years of riding in Davis. In the latter, on 10/30/07, my helmet broke when it smashed into someone's windshield -- probably saving me from a bad concussion and possibly saving my life! In the former, I was caught by someone's car door and left much of my forehead skin on G Street. (That might have been the last time I rode without a helmet!) Okay, neither accident happened on campus, but they have curbs, bollards &amp; other noggin-mushing objects there too. Bicycle helmets are only for people who want to live with intelligence -- if you don't mind a significantly higher chance of traumatic brain injury, don't worry your pretty little head about one. (That's an attempt at grim cynicism!) -- ["Users/DougWalter"]<br> + * Given that I've received a concussion from a solo bike crash while I was wearing a helmet, I fully support the wearing of helmets to mitigate head injuries. The idea of not wearing a helmet just seems absurdly stupid to me, especially if the reasoning is 'because it looks stupid' or 'because I feel stupid.' You could end up a lot more stupid if you crash while not wearing a helmet. --["Users/BrettHall"]</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 27: </td> <td> Line 27: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- <br> - ------</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2007-11-04 21:48:28KaiTing <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 13: </td> <td> Line 13: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Those wearing helmets are more likely to suffer a traumatic head injury than those who do not wear helmets (see the comments section for links that allegedly support this claim). Helmets may give a person a sense of security, <span>and</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> Those wearing helmets are more likely to suffer a traumatic head injury than those who do not wear helmets (see the comments section for links that allegedly support this claim). Helmets may give a person a sense of security, <span>encouraging riskier behavior.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2007-11-04 21:47:05KaiTing <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 13: </td> <td> Line 13: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Those wearing helmets are more likely to suffer a traumatic head injury than those who do not wear helmets (see the comments section for links that allegedly support this claim). </td> <td> <span>+</span> Those wearing helmets are more likely to suffer a traumatic head injury than those who do not wear helmets (see the comments section for links that allegedly support this claim).<span>&nbsp;Helmets may give a person a sense of security, and</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 21: </td> <td> Line 21: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + == Testimontials ==<br> + * I was riding with a group of people traveling about 15-18mph on a county road. One guy hit a bump that caused him to lose his grip and fall forward onto his handlebars (he had been talking and pointing at something, leaving one hand on the grip). When the rear wheel hit the same bump, it bounced up and he landed head-first on the pavement. Two seconds. He ended up with a cracked cheekbone, broken nose, a concussion, and abrasions on his face. While we waited for the ambulance to arrive, I examined his helmet. The foam padding, where it rested on his forehead, was mashed flat. I shudder to think what might've happened had he not been wearing it. I don't know what the statistics say, but seeing that was enough to convince me that wearing a helmet is wise. (So is medical insurance...he didn't have any, unfortunately.) --["Users/DukeMcAdow"]</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 30: </td> <td> Line 33: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- * I was riding with a group of people traveling about 15-18mph on a county road. One guy hit a bump that caused him to lose his grip and fall forward onto his handlebars (he had been talking and pointing at something, leaving one hand on the grip). When the rear wheel hit the same bump, it bounced up and he landed head-first on the pavement. Two seconds. He ended up with a cracked cheekbone, broken nose, a concussion, and abrasions on his face. While we waited for the ambulance to arrive, I examined his helmet. The foam padding, where it rested on his forehead, was mashed flat. I shudder to think what might've happened had he not been wearing it. I don't know what the statistics say, but seeing that was enough to convince me that wearing a helmet is wise. (So is medical insurance...he didn't have any, unfortunately.) --["Users/DukeMcAdow"]</span> </td> <td> <span>+ </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 49: </td> <td> Line 52: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- </span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2007-11-04 21:44:16KaiTing <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- '''Bicycle Helmets''' are ...<br> - <br> - It has been argued that bicycle helmets do not need to be worn, for the following reasons:</span> </td> <td> <span>+ '''Bicycle Helmets''' are, at least on this wiki, the subject of some debate as to whether they're worth wearing.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2007-11-04 21:33:20KaiTing <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 8: </td> <td> Line 8: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- On a per-kilometer and per-hour basis, cycling has been shown to be less dangerous than walking (see the comments section for the links to sites supporting this claim).</span> </td> <td> <span>+ There are more traumatic head injuries due to walking than biking (see the comments section for links that allegedly support this claim). Since pedestrians don't wear helmets, it makes no more sense for cyclists to wear helmets.<br> + <br> + * '''Response''': This logic doesn't work because there are more pedestrians than cyclists. Since nearly everyone walks around on a daily basis, and not nearly as many people ride bikes, it makes sense that there are statistically more traumatic head injuries to pedestrians. However, this does not mean that cycling is less dangerous. By the same logic employed here, you could say that cliff diving is no more dangerous that walking, since more people injure themselves walking than jumping off cliffs. However, cliff diving is obviously more dangerous.<br> + * '''Response''': If walking is no more dangerous than cycling, then it must follow that accidents at 15 mph (the campus speed limit) are no more dangerous than accidents at 5 mph. Or, accidents at 15 mph or no more likely to cause traumatic head injury than accidents at 5 mph. Many feel that the increased speed (and increased risk) of cycling merits strapping on a helmet.</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 11: </td> <td> Line 14: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + Those wearing helmets are more likely to suffer a traumatic head injury than those who do not wear helmets (see the comments section for links that allegedly support this claim).</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 27: </td> <td> Line 32: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- * The links you gave don't support what you're saying, and you seem to lack common sense. Perchance, did you fall off your bike without a helmet on? Also, if you don't think cycling is any more dangerous than walking, you should watch the Tour de France sometime. --["Users/KaiTing"]</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 43: </td> <td> Line 47: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- KaiTing: "The links you gave don't support what you're saying, and you seem to lack common sense."<br> - <br> - You seem to lack reading comprehension skills. I said that as the rate of helmet use goes up, the rate of head injuries rises as well. In the article I provided, the headline states exactly that. I also said that cycling is no more dangerous than walking; the link I provided to back that claim explicitly supported it, as it stated (among other things) that the rate of head injuries amongst pedestrians exceeds that of cyclists.<br> - <br> - * You lack logic. There are also more pedestrians than cyclists. For this reason, the logic: "Cycling is no more dangerous from walking because more people injure themselves while walking" is flawed. To logically back up your claim, you'd have to involve a lot more research than the lone statistic you sited. By the same logic, you could say that swimming in Antarctica is no more dangerous than walking, because more people injure themselves when walking than when swimming in Antarctica. You have to be careful when drawing conclusions from statistics. --["Users/KaiTing"]</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 55: </td> <td> Line 54: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- * As for the other statistic (rate of head injuries increases with rate of helmet use), you have to look at the underlying reasons. Perhaps people who wear helmets do so because they know they're putting themselves at more risk. For instance, all serious cyclists wear helmets. These are the same cyclists who bike inches from each other at 30 mph down Putah Creek Road. It's not a stretch to assume that these cyclists are at greater risk of a head injury, even though wearing a helmet, than the guy who slowly bikes a half mile to class without a helmet. However, it's a horrible application of logic to suggest that the the former cyclists need not wear helmets. -- ["Users/KaiTing"]</span> </td> <td> <span>+ * If you watched the Tour de France, you'd realize how dangerous cycling can be. You said (without qualification) that cycling is no more dangerous than walking. Maybe that's true if you can walk 50 mph. Basically, you're saying that a head injury, when traveling at 5 mph, is no more dangerous than a head injury when traveling at 50 mph (or 20 mph, since that's a speed most of us can obtain when cycling). --["Users/KaiTing"]</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 57: </td> <td> Line 56: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- * I never suggested anything of the sort. Certainly, those who race bicycles or who engage in other riskier forms of cycling (i.e. off-roading, stunt cycling, etc.) should wear helmets. However, day-to-day cyclists like the majority of UC Davis students need not wear helmets as such cyclists face relatively few dangers. --["Users/Maitl"]<br> - <br> - KT: "If you don't think cycling is any more dangerous than walking, you should watch the Tour de France sometime."<br> - <br> - Yes, let us ignore statistics and scientific studies and just watch the Tour de France. Why listen to researchers and statisticians when we can get all the knowledge we need from televised bicycle races? --["Users/Maitl"]<br> - <br> - * Okay, let me spell this out for you. If you watched the Tour de France, you'd realize how dangerous cycling can be. You said, without qualification, that cycling is no more dangerous than walking. Maybe that's true if you can walk 50 mph. Basically, you're saying that a head injury, when traveling at 5 mph, is no more dangerous than a head injury when traveling at 50 mph (or 20 mph, since that's a speed most of us can obtain when cycling). --["Users/KaiTing"]<br> - <br> -</span> * If I was to watch the Tour de France, I would realize how dangerous bicycle RACING would be. The Tour is a race which is completely different from the short and relatively slow bike rides that the average cyclist undertakes. There is simply no comparison between my daily ride to class and Lance Armstrong's arduous, 3000 km trek through France; hence, the Tour de France says nothing about what the typical cyclist experiences. Furthermore, even if watching the event were a substitute for hard statistics and research, it still wouldn't help your case. According to the online encyclopedia Encarta, "accidents resulting in serious injuries or death are rare" and only three people have died in the tour's 100+ year history.--["Users/Maitl"] </td> <td> <span>+ </span> * If I was to watch the Tour de France, I would realize how dangerous bicycle RACING would be. The Tour is a race which is completely different from the short and relatively slow bike rides that the average cyclist undertakes. There is simply no comparison between my daily ride to class and Lance Armstrong's arduous, 3000 km trek through France; hence, the Tour de France says nothing about what the typical cyclist experiences. Furthermore, even if watching the event were a substitute for hard statistics and research, it still wouldn't help your case. According to the online encyclopedia Encarta, "accidents resulting in serious injuries or death are rare" and only three people have died in the tour's 100+ year history.--["Users/Maitl"] </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2007-11-04 17:41:12Maitlsee last edit, just making more changes along similar lines <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 7: </td> <td> Line 7: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> == Cycling is <span>no more</span> dangerous than walking ==<br> -<span>&nbsp;On a</span> per-<span>kilomete</span>r basis, cycling has been shown to be <span>no more</span> dangerous than walking (see the comments section for the links to sites supporting this claim). </td> <td> <span>+</span> == Cycling is <span>less</span> dangerous than walking ==<br> <span>+ On a per</span>-<span>kilometer and</span> per-<span>hou</span>r basis, cycling has been shown to be <span>less</span> dangerous than walking (see the comments section for the links to sites supporting this claim). </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2007-11-04 17:38:18MaitlKaiTing misinterpreted the arguments regarding the relative risk of cycling <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p>No differences found!</div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2007-11-04 17:38:10MaitlKaiTing misinterpreted the arguments regarding the relative risk of cycling <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p>No differences found!</div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2007-11-04 17:36:28MaitlKaiTing misinterpreted the arguments regarding the relative risk of cycling <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 8: </td> <td> Line 8: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- Since more people injure themselves while walking than while biking, wearing a helmet while biking makes no more sense than wearing a helmet while biking.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ On a per-kilometer basis, cycling has been shown to be no more dangerous than walking (see the comments section for the links to sites supporting this claim).</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2007-11-04 17:23:35KaiTingintermediary <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 5: </td> <td> Line 5: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ It has been argued that bicycle helmets do not need to be worn, for the following reasons:<br> + <br> + == Cycling is no more dangerous than walking ==<br> + Since more people injure themselves while walking than while biking, wearing a helmet while biking makes no more sense than wearing a helmet while biking.<br> + <br> + == Head injuries increases with helmet use ==<br> + <br> + == Helmets are only for professors ==<br> + </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 7: </td> <td> Line 16: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- * Staying alive is cool, and helmets help with that. Either you're in high school (worrying about the helmet image factor) or a professor (thinking that professors' heads/lives are the only ones worth protecting). Or maybe your humor is so dry that it has fossilized and doesn't make sense unless you're a paleontologist. --["Users/KaiTing"]</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 10: </td> <td> Line 18: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- ------<br> - ''2007-10-28 16:19:54'' [[nbsp]] There is a large plant in the middle of the bike circle at the edge of the ARC parking lot near Primero Grove; the plant obstructs the view of anyone approaching the bike circle. Every time I go through that bike circle I expect someone to turn the wrong way on the other side and cause a head-on collision. Has anybody else thought something similar either there or anywhere else? --["Users/ScottMorgan"]<br> - * Yes! Are we talking about the circle that is near the driveway of the dining commons across from ARC? I've come around that circle heading west (maybe it's northwest) and had to brake and swerve to miss people (who I couldn't see because of the plants) walking in the middle of the path in the opposite direction. I've also seen many people skipping the circle and going in the wrong direction. Any idea who to contact on campus about this poorly maintained circle? I spent time searching for a phone number or email address, but didn't find one. --["Users/JimEvans"]</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 14: </td> <td> Line 19: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- *That's the one. I don't know who to contact though.--["Users/ScottMorgan"]</span> </td> <td> <span>+ [[Comments()]]<br> + <br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2007-11-04 17:12:04KaiTingmoved from Bicycling Tips <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- '''Bicycle Helmets''' are...</span> </td> <td> <span>+ '''Bicycle Helmets''' are ...<br> + <br> + ''2007-10-26 15:01:16'' [[nbsp]] Bicycle helmets are only for professors. They have so much invested in that noggin, it's actually worth protecting. Otherwise, bike helmets aren't cool. --["Users/BrentLaabs"]<br> + * Notwithstanding many professors are still wearing the same helmets they had 10 or 20 years ago, which have long since deteriorated to the point of uselessness. Which brings me to my next point: helmet standards were improved in 1999, and every helmet manufacturer recommends replacing a helmet every 3-4 years or after an impact, whichever comes first. The foam becomes brittle, so instead of crushing like it's designed to, it simply transmits the force directly into your skull. The paramedics will NOT thank you for using an old helmet if you crash. --["Users/BrettHall"]<br> + * Staying alive is cool, and helmets help with that. Either you're in high school (worrying about the helmet image factor) or a professor (thinking that professors' heads/lives are the only ones worth protecting). Or maybe your humor is so dry that it has fossilized and doesn't make sense unless you're a paleontologist. --["Users/KaiTing"]<br> + * Right on ["Users/BrettHall"] and ["Users/KaiTing"]! I have had but two encounters with cars in over 25 years of riding in Davis. In the latter, on 10/30/07, my helmet broke when it smashed into someone's windshield -- probably saving me from a bad concussion and possibly saving my life! In the former, I was caught by someone's car door and left much of my forehead skin on G Street. (That might have been the last time I rode without a helmet!) Okay, neither accident happened on campus, but they have curbs, bollards &amp; other noggin-mushing objects there too. Bicycle helmets are only for people who want to live with intelligence -- if you don't mind a significantly higher chance of traumatic brain injury, don't worry your pretty little head about one. (That's an attempt at grim cynicism!) -- ["Users/DougWalter"]<br> + * Given that I've received a concussion from a solo bike crash while I was wearing a helmet, I fully support the wearing of helmets to mitigate head injuries. The idea of not wearing a helmet just seems absurdly stupid to me, especially if the reasoning is 'because it looks stupid' or 'because I feel stupid.' You could end up a lot more stupid if you crash while not wearing a helmet. --["Users/BrettHall"]<br> + ------<br> + ''2007-10-28 16:19:54'' [[nbsp]] There is a large plant in the middle of the bike circle at the edge of the ARC parking lot near Primero Grove; the plant obstructs the view of anyone approaching the bike circle. Every time I go through that bike circle I expect someone to turn the wrong way on the other side and cause a head-on collision. Has anybody else thought something similar either there or anywhere else? --["Users/ScottMorgan"]<br> + * Yes! Are we talking about the circle that is near the driveway of the dining commons across from ARC? I've come around that circle heading west (maybe it's northwest) and had to brake and swerve to miss people (who I couldn't see because of the plants) walking in the middle of the path in the opposite direction. I've also seen many people skipping the circle and going in the wrong direction. Any idea who to contact on campus about this poorly maintained circle? I spent time searching for a phone number or email address, but didn't find one. --["Users/JimEvans"]<br> + <br> + *That's the one. I don't know who to contact though.--["Users/ScottMorgan"]<br> + ------<br> + ''2007-11-02 22:29:48'' [[nbsp]] The amount of misinformation on this site regarding helmets is ridiculous. Several people here have suggested that helmets save lives when there is no evidence whatsoever that would support such an assertion. In fact, to the contrary, research has shown that as the rate of helmet use goes up, the rate of head injuries rises as well (http://bicycleuniverse.info/eqp/helmets-nyt.html). This is not at all surprising when you consider that helmets which meet current standard are only designed to prevent direct hits to the head at speeds of 12 miles per hour or less. Consequently, the most a helmet can do is to save you a few stitches or bruises if you fall off a bike; helmets offer practically no protection in serious accidents where one's life is at stake.<br> + <br> + Furthermore, and perhaps most importantly, cycling is no more dangerous than walking(http://www.magma.ca/~ocbc/hfaq.html#A8). I am sure none of you wear helmets when you walk, why then would you wear one when riding a bike? --["Users/Maitl"]<br> + * 12mph is likely average or above average for most people riding on campus and in town (see also: everyone who is on department store or cruiser bikes). Which, by what Mait claims (which is indeed correct), is exactly the speeds for which helmets are designed. No, a helmet will not save you if you get hit by a car (very little will). But it can help immensely if you hit another cyclist, or if you cause yourself to fall and your head hits an object more solid than your skull. I'm as opposed to misinformation as you are, so you'll need a much better anti-helmet argument than "it won't save you if your life is on the line" won't fly with me - because helmets CAN and DO prevent serious injuries (see also: the concussion I suffered while wearing a helmet, in a crash where only I was involved - no, my life would not have been in danger without the helmet, but the helmet did save me a bloody head and trip to the hospital). --["Users/BrettHall"]<br> + * The links you gave don't support what you're saying, and you seem to lack common sense. Perchance, did you fall off your bike without a helmet on? Also, if you don't think cycling is any more dangerous than walking, you should watch the Tour de France sometime. --["Users/KaiTing"]<br> + * I was riding with a group of people traveling about 15-18mph on a county road. One guy hit a bump that caused him to lose his grip and fall forward onto his handlebars (he had been talking and pointing at something, leaving one hand on the grip). When the rear wheel hit the same bump, it bounced up and he landed head-first on the pavement. Two seconds. He ended up with a cracked cheekbone, broken nose, a concussion, and abrasions on his face. While we waited for the ambulance to arrive, I examined his helmet. The foam padding, where it rested on his forehead, was mashed flat. I shudder to think what might've happened had he not been wearing it. I don't know what the statistics say, but seeing that was enough to convince me that wearing a helmet is wise. (So is medical insurance...he didn't have any, unfortunately.) --["Users/DukeMcAdow"]<br> + ------<br> + ''2007-11-03 22:23:32'' [[nbsp]] Brett Hall said: "it can help immensely if you hit another cyclist, or if you cause yourself to fall and your head hits an object more solid than your skull."<br> + <br> + True, but the risk of becoming involved in such an accident and incurring a serious head injury is fantastically low. According to the US center for disease control and prevention, less than 1% of traumatic head injuries result from riding bikes. Given such an incredibly low risk, why should one wear a helmet, even if helmets are effective? Walking is just as dangerous as biking (if not more so), and helmets could undoubtedly also mitigate injuries resulting from walking, but would you wear a helmet each time you stroll through your neighborhood?<br> + <br> + BH:"you'll need a much better anti-helmet argument than "it won't save you if your life is on the line"<br> + <br> + That was only part of my argument. Did you overlook the part where I said that the rate of head injuries has gone up as the rate of helmet use has increased? Did you click on the links I provided? The one leading to the bike helmet FAQ should have been particularly informative.<br> + <br> + <br> + BH: "helmets CAN and DO prevent serious injuries"<br> + <br> + Helmets can also give their wearers a false sense of security which can increase the risk of injury. This is known as "risk compensation" and it may be one of the reasons why widespread helmet use has done nothing to lessen bike-related injuries. Another form of risk compensation may also occur as a result of wearing a helmet: according to a recent study, car drivers tend to drive less cautiously around helmet-wearing cyclists. (http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?chanID=sa029&amp;articleID=778EF0AB-E7F2-99DF-3594A60E4D9A76B2)<br> + <br> + KaiTing: "The links you gave don't support what you're saying, and you seem to lack common sense."<br> + <br> + You seem to lack reading comprehension skills. I said that as the rate of helmet use goes up, the rate of head injuries rises as well. In the article I provided, the headline states exactly that. I also said that cycling is no more dangerous than walking; the link I provided to back that claim explicitly supported it, as it stated (among other things) that the rate of head injuries amongst pedestrians exceeds that of cyclists.<br> + <br> + * You lack logic. There are also more pedestrians than cyclists. For this reason, the logic: "Cycling is no more dangerous from walking because more people injure themselves while walking" is flawed. To logically back up your claim, you'd have to involve a lot more research than the lone statistic you sited. By the same logic, you could say that swimming in Antarctica is no more dangerous than walking, because more people injure themselves when walking than when swimming in Antarctica. You have to be careful when drawing conclusions from statistics. --["Users/KaiTing"]<br> + * Bicycling is safer than walking on a per-hour basis: http://www.bicyclinglife.com/SafetySkills/answer1.htm<br> + <br> + * "Six times as many pedestrians as cyclists are killed by motor traffic, yet travel surveys show annual mileage walked is only five times that cycled; a mile of walking must be more “dangerous” than a mile of cycling."(http://www.bmj.com/cgi/reprint/321/7276/1582.pdf)<br> + <br> + <br> + * On a per-kilometer basis, walking is more dangerous than cycling: http://www.cyclinginstructor.com/cyclinginstructor.nsf/($Category1)/E0A4E09F5D74812F80257177004D9A87/$FILE/c2014.pdf?OpenElement --["Users/Maitl"]<br> + <br> + * As for the other statistic (rate of head injuries increases with rate of helmet use), you have to look at the underlying reasons. Perhaps people who wear helmets do so because they know they're putting themselves at more risk. For instance, all serious cyclists wear helmets. These are the same cyclists who bike inches from each other at 30 mph down Putah Creek Road. It's not a stretch to assume that these cyclists are at greater risk of a head injury, even though wearing a helmet, than the guy who slowly bikes a half mile to class without a helmet. However, it's a horrible application of logic to suggest that the the former cyclists need not wear helmets. -- ["Users/KaiTing"]<br> + <br> + * I never suggested anything of the sort. Certainly, those who race bicycles or who engage in other riskier forms of cycling (i.e. off-roading, stunt cycling, etc.) should wear helmets. However, day-to-day cyclists like the majority of UC Davis students need not wear helmets as such cyclists face relatively few dangers. --["Users/Maitl"]<br> + <br> + KT: "If you don't think cycling is any more dangerous than walking, you should watch the Tour de France sometime."<br> + <br> + Yes, let us ignore statistics and scientific studies and just watch the Tour de France. Why listen to researchers and statisticians when we can get all the knowledge we need from televised bicycle races? --["Users/Maitl"]<br> + <br> + * Okay, let me spell this out for you. If you watched the Tour de France, you'd realize how dangerous cycling can be. You said, without qualification, that cycling is no more dangerous than walking. Maybe that's true if you can walk 50 mph. Basically, you're saying that a head injury, when traveling at 5 mph, is no more dangerous than a head injury when traveling at 50 mph (or 20 mph, since that's a speed most of us can obtain when cycling). --["Users/KaiTing"]<br> + <br> + * If I was to watch the Tour de France, I would realize how dangerous bicycle RACING would be. The Tour is a race which is completely different from the short and relatively slow bike rides that the average cyclist undertakes. There is simply no comparison between my daily ride to class and Lance Armstrong's arduous, 3000 km trek through France; hence, the Tour de France says nothing about what the typical cyclist experiences. Furthermore, even if watching the event were a substitute for hard statistics and research, it still wouldn't help your case. According to the online encyclopedia Encarta, "accidents resulting in serious injuries or death are rare" and only three people have died in the tour's 100+ year history.--["Users/Maitl"]<br> + <br> + * If wearing a helmet makes me at all safer in terms of the outcome of an accident then I will do it. By the way, your links refer to observational studies which can not be used to support the cause and effect relationships your arguments imply.--["Users/ScottMorgan"]<br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2007-11-04 17:04:49JasonAllerUpload of image <a href="http://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets?action=Files&do=view&target=Helmet.JPG">Helmet.JPG</a>.Bicycle Helmetshttp://daviswiki.org/Bicycle_Helmets2007-11-04 17:04:28JasonAllerfigure with all the discussion we might as well start this page <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Bicycle Helmets<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ [[Image(Helmet.JPG, right, thumbnail, 400)]]<br> + <br> + '''Bicycle Helmets''' are...<br> + <br> + [[Include(Seed)]]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div>