Recent Changes for "Carl Gorman Museum" - Davis Wikihttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_MuseumRecent Changes of the page "Carl Gorman Museum" on Davis Wiki.en-us Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2011-02-03 19:05:18PeteBmoved pic up <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Carl Gorman Museum<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ [[Image(CNG-IPC-1.gif,right)]]</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 10: </td> <td> Line 11: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- [[Image(CNG-IPC-1.gif,right)]]<br> - </span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2011-02-03 19:05:02PeteBmoved pic to right to move up text below <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Carl Gorman Museum<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 10: </td> <td> Line 10: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> [[Image(CNG-IPC-1.gif)]] </td> <td> <span>+</span> [[Image(CNG-IPC-1.gif<span>,right</span>)]] </td> </tr> </table> </div> Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2011-02-03 19:04:39PeteBfixed spacing <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Carl Gorman Museum<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 2: </td> <td> Line 2: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- </span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2011-02-03 19:03:48PeteBMap location(s) modifiedCarl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2011-02-03 19:03:48PeteBmacro'ed addy <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Carl Gorman Museum<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 2: </td> <td> Line 2: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ||1316 ["Hart Hall"]|| </td> <td> <span>+ <br> +</span> ||<span>[[Address(</span>1316 ["Hart Hall"]<span>)]]</span>|| </td> </tr> </table> </div> Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2010-08-29 22:07:19VeronicaPassalacqua <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Carl Gorman Museum<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 10: </td> <td> Line 10: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- [[Include(PhotoRequest)]]</span> </td> <td> <span>+ [[Image(CNG-IPC-1.gif)]]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2010-08-29 22:04:59VeronicaPassalacqua <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Carl Gorman Museum<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 4: </td> <td> Line 4: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ||Mon-<span>Wed, </span>Fri 1<span>1</span>-<span>4</span>PM|| </td> <td> <span>+</span> ||Mon-Fri 1<span>2</span>-<span>5</span>PM|| </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 12: </td> <td> Line 12: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- The Carl Gorman Museum is one of the best galleries in the nation to feature contemporary Native American Art. It is named after Carl Nelson Gorman(19??-[http://www.nytimes.com/2005/11/05/arts/05gorman.html 2005-11-03]), a Navajo artist and advocate, and a founding faculty member of the Native American Studies Department at UC Davis. Founded in ["1973"], it is funded by the UCD Department of ["Native American Studies"] and private support. The gallery currently hosts four exhibits per year.<br> - </span> </td> <td> <span>+ The C.N. Gorman Museum is committed to the creative expressions of Native American artists, and artists of diverse cultures and histories. Changing exhibits feature contemporary artwork in a wide range of media, reflecting the canon in which Indigenous artists are working today. Founded in 1973 by the Department of Native American Studies, the museum is named in honor of retired faculty member, Carl Nelson Gorman, Navajo artist, WWII code-talker, cultural historian, and advocate for Native peoples.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2010-08-29 22:03:37VeronicaPassalacquaUpload of image <a href="http://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum?action=Files&do=view&target=CNG-IPC-1.gif">CNG-IPC-1.gif</a>.Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2010-08-07 15:41:58MasonMurrayphoto request <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Carl Gorman Museum<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 10: </td> <td> Line 10: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ [[Include(PhotoRequest)]]<br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2008-06-14 12:31:00JasonAller <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Carl Gorman Museum<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 10: </td> <td> Line 10: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> The Carl Gorman Museum is one of the best galleries in the nation to feature contemporary Native American Art. It is named after Carl Nelson Gorman(19??-[http://www.nytimes.com/2005/11/05/arts/05gorman.html 2005-11-03]), a Navajo artist and advocate, and a founding faculty member of the Native American Studies Department at UC Davis. Founded in 1973, it is funded by the UCD Department of Native American Studies and private support. The gallery currently hosts four exhibits per year. </td> <td> <span>+</span> The Carl Gorman Museum is one of the best galleries in the nation to feature contemporary Native American Art. It is named after Carl Nelson Gorman(19??-[http://www.nytimes.com/2005/11/05/arts/05gorman.html 2005-11-03]), a Navajo artist and advocate, and a founding faculty member of the Native American Studies Department at UC Davis. Founded in <span>["</span>1973<span>"]</span>, it is funded by the UCD Department of <span>["</span>Native American Studies<span>"]</span> and private support. The gallery currently hosts four exhibits per year. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2007-10-25 21:40:37WilyFerret <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Carl Gorman Museum<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 12: </td> <td> Line 12: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- Depending on your point of view, the stories that sculptor Ted Sitting Crow Garner tells in lacquered wood and watercolor could be taken as wittily irreverent or downright disrespectful. At first glance, you notice the large bone through the nose of “Voodoo Economist” (lacquered wood). Then you realize that the figure is unsuccessfully hiding a large, stylized dollar sign behind its back while offering a one-cent symbol out front. The title of “Your Voice in Wash DC” (lacquered wood and watercolor) comes from a neon sign in front of former U.S. Congressman Dan Rostenkowski’s office in Garner’s Chicago neighborhood. A fat cigar extends from a disembodied mouth and punches through a lush green watercolor landscape, becoming a belching smokestack. Garner says that over his 30-year career, his challenge has been to create works that provide these kinds of thoughtful perspectives on icons of popular culture that many take for granted. “New Works by Ted Sitting Crow Garner” is continually showing at Gorman Museum, 1316 Hart Hall, UC Davis, in varying guises...new ongoing exhibits will be equally challenging...</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2007-10-16 07:37:38JabberWokky http://www.newsreview.com/binary/3c7c/artpick-1283.jpeg is very polite. <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Carl Gorman Museum<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 12: </td> <td> Line 12: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- Here is an interesting example of a Native American artist's work recently exhibited at the Gorman:<br> - <br> - http://www.newsreview.com/binary/3c7c/artpick-1283.jpeg</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2007-10-15 21:49:52WilyFerret <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Carl Gorman Museum<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 15: </td> <td> Line 15: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Depending on your point of view, the stories that sculptor Ted Sitting Crow Garner tells in lacquered wood and watercolor could be taken as wittily irreverent or downright disrespectful. At first glance, you notice the large bone through the nose of “Voodoo Economist” (lacquered wood). Then you realize that the figure is unsuccessfully hiding a large, stylized dollar sign behind its back while offering a one-cent symbol out front. The title of “Your Voice in Wash DC” (lacquered wood and watercolor) comes from a neon sign in front of former U.S. Congressman Dan Rostenkowski’s office in Garner’s Chicago neighborhood. A fat cigar extends from a disembodied mouth and punches through a lush green watercolor landscape, becoming a belching smokestack. Garner says that over his 30-year career, his challenge has been to create works that provide these kinds of thoughtful perspectives on icons of popular culture that many take for granted. “New Works by Ted Sitting Crow Garner” is continually showing at Gorman Museum, 1316 Hart Hall, UC Davis, in varying guises...new ongoing exhibits will be equally challenging<span>:<br> - Check out their website:</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> Depending on your point of view, the stories that sculptor Ted Sitting Crow Garner tells in lacquered wood and watercolor could be taken as wittily irreverent or downright disrespectful. At first glance, you notice the large bone through the nose of “Voodoo Economist” (lacquered wood). Then you realize that the figure is unsuccessfully hiding a large, stylized dollar sign behind its back while offering a one-cent symbol out front. The title of “Your Voice in Wash DC” (lacquered wood and watercolor) comes from a neon sign in front of former U.S. Congressman Dan Rostenkowski’s office in Garner’s Chicago neighborhood. A fat cigar extends from a disembodied mouth and punches through a lush green watercolor landscape, becoming a belching smokestack. Garner says that over his 30-year career, his challenge has been to create works that provide these kinds of thoughtful perspectives on icons of popular culture that many take for granted. “New Works by Ted Sitting Crow Garner” is continually showing at Gorman Museum, 1316 Hart Hall, UC Davis, in varying guises...new ongoing exhibits will be equally challenging<span>...</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2007-10-15 21:49:12WilyFerret <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Carl Gorman Museum<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 15: </td> <td> Line 15: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Depending on your point of view, the stories that sculptor Ted Sitting Crow Garner tells in lacquered wood and watercolor could be taken as wittily irreverent or downright disrespectful. At first glance, you notice the large bone through the nose of “Voodoo Economist” (lacquered wood). Then you realize that the figure is unsuccessfully hiding a large, stylized dollar sign behind its back while offering a one-cent symbol out front. The title of “Your Voice in Wash DC” (lacquered wood and watercolor) comes from a neon sign in front of former U.S. Congressman Dan Rostenkowski’s office in Garner’s Chicago neighborhood. A fat cigar extends from a disembodied mouth and punches through a lush green watercolor landscape, becoming a belching smokestack. Garner says that over his 30-year career, his challenge has been to create works that provide these kinds of thoughtful perspectives on icons of popular culture that many take for granted. “New Works by Ted Sitting Crow Garner” is continually showing at Gorman Museum, 1316 Hart Hall, UC Davis, in varying guises. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Depending on your point of view, the stories that sculptor Ted Sitting Crow Garner tells in lacquered wood and watercolor could be taken as wittily irreverent or downright disrespectful. At first glance, you notice the large bone through the nose of “Voodoo Economist” (lacquered wood). Then you realize that the figure is unsuccessfully hiding a large, stylized dollar sign behind its back while offering a one-cent symbol out front. The title of “Your Voice in Wash DC” (lacquered wood and watercolor) comes from a neon sign in front of former U.S. Congressman Dan Rostenkowski’s office in Garner’s Chicago neighborhood. A fat cigar extends from a disembodied mouth and punches through a lush green watercolor landscape, becoming a belching smokestack. Garner says that over his 30-year career, his challenge has been to create works that provide these kinds of thoughtful perspectives on icons of popular culture that many take for granted. “New Works by Ted Sitting Crow Garner” is continually showing at Gorman Museum, 1316 Hart Hall, UC Davis, in varying guises.<span>..new ongoing exhibits will be equally challenging:<br> + Check out their website:</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2007-10-15 21:47:25WilyFerret <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Carl Gorman Museum<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 15: </td> <td> Line 15: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Depending on your point of view, the stories that sculptor Ted Sitting Crow Garner tells in lacquered wood and watercolor could be taken as wittily irreverent or downright disrespectful. At first glance, you notice the large bone through the nose of “Voodoo Economist” (lacquered wood). Then you realize that the figure is unsuccessfully hiding a large, stylized dollar sign behind its back while offering a one-cent symbol out front. The title of “Your Voice in Wash DC” (lacquered wood and watercolor) comes from a neon sign in front of former U.S. Congressman Dan Rostenkowski’s office in Garner’s Chicago neighborhood. A fat cigar extends from a disembodied mouth and punches through a lush green watercolor landscape, becoming a belching smokestack. Garner says that over his 30-year career, his challenge has been to create works that provide these kinds of thoughtful perspectives on icons of popular culture that many take for granted. “New Works by Ted Sitting Crow Garner” is showing at Gorman Museum, 1316 Hart Hall, UC Davis, in <span>different</span> guises. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Depending on your point of view, the stories that sculptor Ted Sitting Crow Garner tells in lacquered wood and watercolor could be taken as wittily irreverent or downright disrespectful. At first glance, you notice the large bone through the nose of “Voodoo Economist” (lacquered wood). Then you realize that the figure is unsuccessfully hiding a large, stylized dollar sign behind its back while offering a one-cent symbol out front. The title of “Your Voice in Wash DC” (lacquered wood and watercolor) comes from a neon sign in front of former U.S. Congressman Dan Rostenkowski’s office in Garner’s Chicago neighborhood. A fat cigar extends from a disembodied mouth and punches through a lush green watercolor landscape, becoming a belching smokestack. Garner says that over his 30-year career, his challenge has been to create works that provide these kinds of thoughtful perspectives on icons of popular culture that many take for granted. “New Works by Ted Sitting Crow Garner” is <span>continually </span>showing at Gorman Museum, 1316 Hart Hall, UC Davis, in <span>varying</span> guises. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2007-10-15 21:46:16WilyFerret <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Carl Gorman Museum<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 15: </td> <td> Line 15: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Depending on your point of view, the stories that sculptor Ted Sitting Crow Garner tells in lacquered wood and watercolor could be taken as wittily irreverent or downright disrespectful. At first glance, you notice the large bone through the nose of “Voodoo Economist” (lacquered wood). Then you realize that the figure is unsuccessfully hiding a large, stylized dollar sign behind its back while offering a one-cent symbol out front. The title of “Your Voice in Wash DC” (lacquered wood and watercolor) comes from a neon sign in front of former U.S. Congressman Dan Rostenkowski’s office in Garner’s Chicago neighborhood. A fat cigar extends from a disembodied mouth and punches through a lush green watercolor landscape, becoming a belching smokestack. Garner says that over his 30-year career, his challenge has been to create works that provide these kinds of thoughtful perspectives on icons of popular culture that many take for granted. “New Works by Ted Sitting Crow Garner” is showing at Gorman Museum, 1316 Hart Hall, UC Davis, <span>through our tim</span>es. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Depending on your point of view, the stories that sculptor Ted Sitting Crow Garner tells in lacquered wood and watercolor could be taken as wittily irreverent or downright disrespectful. At first glance, you notice the large bone through the nose of “Voodoo Economist” (lacquered wood). Then you realize that the figure is unsuccessfully hiding a large, stylized dollar sign behind its back while offering a one-cent symbol out front. The title of “Your Voice in Wash DC” (lacquered wood and watercolor) comes from a neon sign in front of former U.S. Congressman Dan Rostenkowski’s office in Garner’s Chicago neighborhood. A fat cigar extends from a disembodied mouth and punches through a lush green watercolor landscape, becoming a belching smokestack. Garner says that over his 30-year career, his challenge has been to create works that provide these kinds of thoughtful perspectives on icons of popular culture that many take for granted. “New Works by Ted Sitting Crow Garner” is showing at Gorman Museum, 1316 Hart Hall, UC Davis, <span>in different guis</span>es.<span><br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2007-10-15 21:39:43WilyFerret <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Carl Gorman Museum<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 15: </td> <td> Line 15: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Depending on your point of view, the stories that sculptor Ted Sitting Crow Garner tells in lacquered wood and watercolor could be taken as wittily irreverent or downright disrespectful. At first glance, you notice the large bone through the nose of “Voodoo Economist” (lacquered wood). Then you realize that the figure is unsuccessfully hiding a large, stylized dollar sign behind its back while offering a one-cent symbol out front. The title of “Your Voice in Wash DC” (lacquered wood and watercolor) comes from a neon sign in front of former U.S. Congressman Dan Rostenkowski’s office in Garner’s Chicago neighborhood. A fat cigar extends from a disembodied mouth and punches through a lush green watercolor landscape, becoming a belching smokestack. Garner says that over his 30-year career, his challenge has been to create works that provide these kinds of thoughtful perspectives on icons of popular culture that many take for granted. “New Works by Ted Sitting Crow Garner” is showing at Gorman Museum, 1316 Hart Hall, UC Davis, through <span>crazy</span> times. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Depending on your point of view, the stories that sculptor Ted Sitting Crow Garner tells in lacquered wood and watercolor could be taken as wittily irreverent or downright disrespectful. At first glance, you notice the large bone through the nose of “Voodoo Economist” (lacquered wood). Then you realize that the figure is unsuccessfully hiding a large, stylized dollar sign behind its back while offering a one-cent symbol out front. The title of “Your Voice in Wash DC” (lacquered wood and watercolor) comes from a neon sign in front of former U.S. Congressman Dan Rostenkowski’s office in Garner’s Chicago neighborhood. A fat cigar extends from a disembodied mouth and punches through a lush green watercolor landscape, becoming a belching smokestack. Garner says that over his 30-year career, his challenge has been to create works that provide these kinds of thoughtful perspectives on icons of popular culture that many take for granted. “New Works by Ted Sitting Crow Garner” is showing at Gorman Museum, 1316 Hart Hall, UC Davis, through <span>our</span> times. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2007-10-15 21:38:46WilliamLewisrm brackets <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Carl Gorman Museum<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 14: </td> <td> Line 14: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> <span>[[</span>http://www.newsreview.com/binary/3c7c/artpick-1283.jpeg<span>]]</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> http://www.newsreview.com/binary/3c7c/artpick-1283.jpeg </td> </tr> </table> </div> Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2007-10-15 21:38:06WilyFerret <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Carl Gorman Museum<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 15: </td> <td> Line 15: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Depending on your point of view, the stories that sculptor Ted Sitting Crow Garner tells in lacquered wood and watercolor could be taken as wittily irreverent or downright disrespectful. At first glance, you notice the large bone through the nose of “Voodoo Economist” (lacquered wood). Then you realize that the figure is unsuccessfully hiding a large, stylized dollar sign behind its back while offering a one-cent symbol out front. The title of “Your Voice in Wash DC” (lacquered wood and watercolor) comes from a neon sign in front of former U.S. Congressman Dan Rostenkowski’s office in Garner’s Chicago neighborhood. A fat cigar extends from a disembodied mouth and punches through a lush green watercolor landscape, becoming a belching smokestack. Garner says that over his 30-year career, his challenge has been to create works that provide these kinds of thoughtful perspectives on icons of popular culture that many take for granted. “New Works by Ted Sitting Crow Garner” is showing at Gorman Museum, 1316 Hart Hall, UC Davis, through <span>Mar</span>.<span>&nbsp;30.</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> Depending on your point of view, the stories that sculptor Ted Sitting Crow Garner tells in lacquered wood and watercolor could be taken as wittily irreverent or downright disrespectful. At first glance, you notice the large bone through the nose of “Voodoo Economist” (lacquered wood). Then you realize that the figure is unsuccessfully hiding a large, stylized dollar sign behind its back while offering a one-cent symbol out front. The title of “Your Voice in Wash DC” (lacquered wood and watercolor) comes from a neon sign in front of former U.S. Congressman Dan Rostenkowski’s office in Garner’s Chicago neighborhood. A fat cigar extends from a disembodied mouth and punches through a lush green watercolor landscape, becoming a belching smokestack. Garner says that over his 30-year career, his challenge has been to create works that provide these kinds of thoughtful perspectives on icons of popular culture that many take for granted. “New Works by Ted Sitting Crow Garner” is showing at Gorman Museum, 1316 Hart Hall, UC Davis, through <span>crazy times</span>. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2007-10-15 21:37:02WilyFerret <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Carl Gorman Museum<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 14: </td> <td> Line 14: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> [[http://www.newsreview.com/binary/3c7c/artpick-1283.jpeg<span>, thumbnail, 250)</span>]] </td> <td> <span>+</span> [[http://www.newsreview.com/binary/3c7c/artpick-1283.jpeg]] </td> </tr> </table> </div> Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2007-10-15 21:34:56WilyFerret <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Carl Gorman Museum<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 15: </td> <td> Line 15: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- </span> </td> <td> <span>+ Depending on your point of view, the stories that sculptor Ted Sitting Crow Garner tells in lacquered wood and watercolor could be taken as wittily irreverent or downright disrespectful. At first glance, you notice the large bone through the nose of “Voodoo Economist” (lacquered wood). Then you realize that the figure is unsuccessfully hiding a large, stylized dollar sign behind its back while offering a one-cent symbol out front. The title of “Your Voice in Wash DC” (lacquered wood and watercolor) comes from a neon sign in front of former U.S. Congressman Dan Rostenkowski’s office in Garner’s Chicago neighborhood. A fat cigar extends from a disembodied mouth and punches through a lush green watercolor landscape, becoming a belching smokestack. Garner says that over his 30-year career, his challenge has been to create works that provide these kinds of thoughtful perspectives on icons of popular culture that many take for granted. “New Works by Ted Sitting Crow Garner” is showing at Gorman Museum, 1316 Hart Hall, UC Davis, through Mar. 30.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2007-10-15 21:33:05WilyFerret <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Carl Gorman Museum<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 15: </td> <td> Line 15: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2007-10-15 21:31:27WilyFerret <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Carl Gorman Museum<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 15: </td> <td> Line 15: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- Depending on your point of view, the stories that sculptor Ted Sitting Crow Garner tells in lacquered wood and watercolor could be taken as wittily irreverent or downright disrespectful. At first glance, you notice the large bone through the nose of “Voodoo Economist” (lacquered wood). Then you realize that the figure is unsuccessfully hiding a large, stylized dollar sign behind its back while offering a one-cent symbol out front. The title of “Your Voice in Wash DC” (lacquered wood and watercolor) comes from a neon sign in front of former U.S. Congressman Dan Rostenkowski’s office in Garner’s Chicago neighborhood. A fat cigar extends from a disembodied mouth and punches through a lush green watercolor landscape, becoming a belching smokestack. Garner says that over his 30-year career, his challenge has been to create works that provide these kinds of thoughtful perspectives on icons of popular culture that many take for granted. “New Works by Ted Sitting Crow Garner” is showing at Gorman Museum, 1316 Hart Hall, UC Davis, as long as white people can stand it.<br> - </span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2007-10-15 21:30:48WilyFerret <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Carl Gorman Museum<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 15: </td> <td> Line 15: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Depending on your point of view, the stories that sculptor Ted Sitting Crow Garner tells in lacquered wood and watercolor could be taken as wittily irreverent or downright disrespectful. At first glance, you notice the large bone through the nose of “Voodoo Economist” (lacquered wood). Then you realize that the figure is unsuccessfully hiding a large, stylized dollar sign behind its back while offering a one-cent symbol out front. The title of “Your Voice in Wash DC” (lacquered wood and watercolor) comes from a neon sign in front of former U.S. Congressman Dan Rostenkowski’s office in Garner’s Chicago neighborhood. A fat cigar extends from a disembodied mouth and punches through a lush green watercolor landscape, becoming a belching smokestack. Garner says that over his 30-year career, his challenge has been to create works that provide these kinds of thoughtful perspectives on icons of popular culture that many take for granted. “New Works by Ted Sitting Crow Garner” is showing at Gorman Museum, 1316 Hart Hall, UC Davis, <span>through Mar</span>.<span>&nbsp;30.</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> Depending on your point of view, the stories that sculptor Ted Sitting Crow Garner tells in lacquered wood and watercolor could be taken as wittily irreverent or downright disrespectful. At first glance, you notice the large bone through the nose of “Voodoo Economist” (lacquered wood). Then you realize that the figure is unsuccessfully hiding a large, stylized dollar sign behind its back while offering a one-cent symbol out front. The title of “Your Voice in Wash DC” (lacquered wood and watercolor) comes from a neon sign in front of former U.S. Congressman Dan Rostenkowski’s office in Garner’s Chicago neighborhood. A fat cigar extends from a disembodied mouth and punches through a lush green watercolor landscape, becoming a belching smokestack. Garner says that over his 30-year career, his challenge has been to create works that provide these kinds of thoughtful perspectives on icons of popular culture that many take for granted. “New Works by Ted Sitting Crow Garner” is showing at Gorman Museum, 1316 Hart Hall, UC Davis, <span>as long as white people can stand it</span>. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2007-10-15 21:29:48WilyFerret <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Carl Gorman Museum<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 15: </td> <td> Line 15: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- </span> </td> <td> <span>+ Depending on your point of view, the stories that sculptor Ted Sitting Crow Garner tells in lacquered wood and watercolor could be taken as wittily irreverent or downright disrespectful. At first glance, you notice the large bone through the nose of “Voodoo Economist” (lacquered wood). Then you realize that the figure is unsuccessfully hiding a large, stylized dollar sign behind its back while offering a one-cent symbol out front. The title of “Your Voice in Wash DC” (lacquered wood and watercolor) comes from a neon sign in front of former U.S. Congressman Dan Rostenkowski’s office in Garner’s Chicago neighborhood. A fat cigar extends from a disembodied mouth and punches through a lush green watercolor landscape, becoming a belching smokestack. Garner says that over his 30-year career, his challenge has been to create works that provide these kinds of thoughtful perspectives on icons of popular culture that many take for granted. “New Works by Ted Sitting Crow Garner” is showing at Gorman Museum, 1316 Hart Hall, UC Davis, through Mar. 30.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2007-10-15 21:28:04WilyFerret <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Carl Gorman Museum<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 14: </td> <td> Line 14: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> [[<span>Image </span>http://www.newsreview.com/binary/3c7c/artpick-1283.jpeg, <span>left, </span>thumbnail, 250)]] </td> <td> <span>+</span> [[http://www.newsreview.com/binary/3c7c/artpick-1283.jpeg, thumbnail, 250)]] </td> </tr> </table> </div> Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2007-10-15 21:27:21WilyFerret <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Carl Gorman Museum<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 14: </td> <td> Line 14: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> [[Image<span>(.</span>http://www.newsreview.com/binary/3c7c/artpick-1283.jpeg, left, thumbnail, 250)]] </td> <td> <span>+</span> [[Image<span>&nbsp;</span>http://www.newsreview.com/binary/3c7c/artpick-1283.jpeg, left, thumbnail, 250)]] </td> </tr> </table> </div> Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2007-10-15 21:25:52WilyFerret <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Carl Gorman Museum<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 10: </td> <td> Line 10: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> The Carl Gorman Museum is one of <span>only a few</span> galleries in the nation <span>featuring</span> contemporary Native American Art. It is named after Carl Nelson Gorman(19??-[http://www.nytimes.com/2005/11/05/arts/05gorman.html 2005-11-03]), a Navajo artist and advocate, and a founding faculty member of the Native American Studies Department at UC Davis. Founded in 1973, it is funded by the UCD Department of Native American Studies and private support. The gallery currently hosts four exhibits per year. </td> <td> <span>+</span> The Carl Gorman Museum is one of <span>the best</span> galleries in the nation <span>to feature</span> contemporary Native American Art. It is named after Carl Nelson Gorman(19??-[http://www.nytimes.com/2005/11/05/arts/05gorman.html 2005-11-03]), a Navajo artist and advocate, and a founding faculty member of the Native American Studies Department at UC Davis. Founded in 1973, it is funded by the UCD Department of Native American Studies and private support. The gallery currently hosts four exhibits per year.<span><br> + <br> + Here is an interesting example of a Native American artist's work recently exhibited at the Gorman:<br> + <br> + [[Image(.http://www.newsreview.com/binary/3c7c/artpick-1283.jpeg, left, thumbnail, 250)]]<br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2005-11-06 19:59:55NickSchmalenberger <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Carl Gorman Museum<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 10: </td> <td> Line 10: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> The Carl Gorman Museum is one of only a few galleries in the nation featuring contemporary Native American Art. It is named after Carl Nelson Gorman(19??-[http://www.nytimes.com/2005/11/05/arts/05gorman.html 2005-11-03]) a Navajo artist and advocate, and a founding faculty member of the Native American Studies Department at UC Davis. Founded in 1973, it is funded by the UCD Department of Native American Studies and private support. The gallery currently hosts four exhibits per year. </td> <td> <span>+</span> The Carl Gorman Museum is one of only a few galleries in the nation featuring contemporary Native American Art. It is named after Carl Nelson Gorman(19??-[http://www.nytimes.com/2005/11/05/arts/05gorman.html 2005-11-03])<span>,</span> a Navajo artist and advocate, and a founding faculty member of the Native American Studies Department at UC Davis. Founded in 1973, it is funded by the UCD Department of Native American Studies and private support. The gallery currently hosts four exhibits per year. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2005-11-06 19:58:02NickSchmalenbergerGorman died, link to obituary <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Carl Gorman Museum<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 10: </td> <td> Line 10: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> -<span>&nbsp;The Carl Gorman Museum is one of only a fe</span>w<span>&nbsp;</span>g<span>alleries in the nation featuring contemporary Native American Art. It is named after Carl Nelson Gorman,</span> a Navajo artist and advocate, and a founding faculty member of the Native American Studies Department at UC Davis. Founded in 1973, it is funded by the UCD Department of Native American Studies and private support. The gallery currently hosts four exhibits per year. </td> <td> <span>+ The Carl Gorman Museum is one of only a few galleries in the nation featuring contemporary Native American Art. It is named after Carl Nelson Gorman(19??</span>-<span>[http://</span>w<span>ww.nytimes.com/2005/11/05/arts/05</span>g<span>orman.html 2005-11-03])</span> a Navajo artist and advocate, and a founding faculty member of the Native American Studies Department at UC Davis. Founded in 1973, it is funded by the UCD Department of Native American Studies and private support. The gallery currently hosts four exhibits per year. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2005-11-06 18:54:13MiriamKaufman <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Carl Gorman Museum<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 12: </td> <td> Line 12: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> See more ["museums and exhibits"]. </td> <td> <span>+</span> See more ["museums and exhibits"]<span>&nbsp;or ["art galleries"]</span>. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2005-11-06 18:47:59MiriamKaufmanlink <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Carl Gorman Museum<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 10: </td> <td> Line 10: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> The Carl Gorman Museum is one of only a few galleries in the nation featuring contemporary Native American Art. It is named after Carl Nelson Gorman, a Navajo artist and advocate, and a founding faculty member of the Native American Studies Department at U<span>.</span>C<span>.</span> Davis. Founded in 1973, it is funded by the UCD Department of Native American Studies and private support. The gallery currently hosts four exhibits per year. </td> <td> <span>+</span> The Carl Gorman Museum is one of only a few galleries in the nation featuring contemporary Native American Art. It is named after Carl Nelson Gorman, a Navajo artist and advocate, and a founding faculty member of the Native American Studies Department at UC Davis. Founded in 1973, it is funded by the UCD Department of Native American Studies and private support. The gallery currently hosts four exhibits per year.<span><br> + <br> + See more ["museums and exhibits"].</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2005-03-22 11:03:58AmeliaCarlsonRevert to version dated 2005-02-13 21:31:32. <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Carl Gorman Museum<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 2: </td> <td> Line 2: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ||1316<span>[[nbsp]]</span>["Hart Hall"<span>&nbsp;Hart_Hall</span>]|| </td> <td> <span>+</span> ||1316<span>&nbsp;</span>["Hart Hall"]|| </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 4: </td> <td> Line 4: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ||Mon-Wed,<span>[[nbsp]]</span>Fri<span>[[nbsp]]</span>11-4PM|| </td> <td> <span>+</span> ||Mon-Wed,<span>&nbsp;</span>Fri<span>&nbsp;</span>11-4PM|| </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 10: </td> <td> Line 10: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- The[[nbsp]]Carl[[nbsp]]Gorman[[nbsp]]Museum[[nbsp]]is[[nbsp]]one[[nbsp]]of[[nbsp]]only[[nbsp]]a[[nbsp]]few[[nbsp]]galleries[[nbsp]]in[[nbsp]]the[[nbsp]]nation[[nbsp]]featuring[[nbsp]]contemporary[[nbsp]]Native[[nbsp]]American[[nbsp]]Art.[[nbsp]]It[[nbsp]]is[[nbsp]]named[[nbsp]]after[[nbsp]]Carl[[nbsp]]Nelson[[nbsp]]Gorman,[[nbsp]]a[[nbsp]]Navajo[[nbsp]]artist[[nbsp]]and[[nbsp]]advocate,[[nbsp]]and[[nbsp]]a[[nbsp]]founding[[nbsp]]faculty[[nbsp]]member[[nbsp]]of[[nbsp]]the[[nbsp]]Native[[nbsp]]American[[nbsp]]Studies[[nbsp]]Department[[nbsp]]at[[nbsp]]U.C.[[nbsp]]Davis.[[nbsp]]Founded[[nbsp]]in[[nbsp]]1973,[[nbsp]]it[[nbsp]]is[[nbsp]]funded[[nbsp]]by[[nbsp]]the[[nbsp]]UCD[[nbsp]]Department[[nbsp]]of[[nbsp]]Native[[nbsp]]American[[nbsp]]Studies[[nbsp]]and[[nbsp]]private[[nbsp]]support.[[nbsp]]The[[nbsp]]gallery[[nbsp]]currently[[nbsp]]hosts[[nbsp]]four[[nbsp]]exhibits[[nbsp]]per[[nbsp]]year.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ The Carl Gorman Museum is one of only a few galleries in the nation featuring contemporary Native American Art. It is named after Carl Nelson Gorman, a Navajo artist and advocate, and a founding faculty member of the Native American Studies Department at U.C. Davis. Founded in 1973, it is funded by the UCD Department of Native American Studies and private support. The gallery currently hosts four exhibits per year.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2005-03-22 10:01:02RobertMorrisAll Rights Reversed <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Carl Gorman Museum<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 2: </td> <td> Line 2: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ||1316<span>&nbsp;</span>["Hart Hall"]|| </td> <td> <span>+</span> ||1316<span>[[nbsp]]</span>["Hart Hall"<span>&nbsp;Hart_Hall</span>]|| </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 4: </td> <td> Line 4: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ||Mon-Wed,<span>&nbsp;</span>Fri<span>&nbsp;</span>11-4PM|| </td> <td> <span>+</span> ||Mon-Wed,<span>[[nbsp]]</span>Fri<span>[[nbsp]]</span>11-4PM|| </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 10: </td> <td> Line 10: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- The Carl Gorman Museum is one of only a few galleries in the nation featuring contemporary Native American Art. It is named after Carl Nelson Gorman, a Navajo artist and advocate, and a founding faculty member of the Native American Studies Department at U.C. Davis. Founded in 1973, it is funded by the UCD Department of Native American Studies and private support. The gallery currently hosts four exhibits per year.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ The[[nbsp]]Carl[[nbsp]]Gorman[[nbsp]]Museum[[nbsp]]is[[nbsp]]one[[nbsp]]of[[nbsp]]only[[nbsp]]a[[nbsp]]few[[nbsp]]galleries[[nbsp]]in[[nbsp]]the[[nbsp]]nation[[nbsp]]featuring[[nbsp]]contemporary[[nbsp]]Native[[nbsp]]American[[nbsp]]Art.[[nbsp]]It[[nbsp]]is[[nbsp]]named[[nbsp]]after[[nbsp]]Carl[[nbsp]]Nelson[[nbsp]]Gorman,[[nbsp]]a[[nbsp]]Navajo[[nbsp]]artist[[nbsp]]and[[nbsp]]advocate,[[nbsp]]and[[nbsp]]a[[nbsp]]founding[[nbsp]]faculty[[nbsp]]member[[nbsp]]of[[nbsp]]the[[nbsp]]Native[[nbsp]]American[[nbsp]]Studies[[nbsp]]Department[[nbsp]]at[[nbsp]]U.C.[[nbsp]]Davis.[[nbsp]]Founded[[nbsp]]in[[nbsp]]1973,[[nbsp]]it[[nbsp]]is[[nbsp]]funded[[nbsp]]by[[nbsp]]the[[nbsp]]UCD[[nbsp]]Department[[nbsp]]of[[nbsp]]Native[[nbsp]]American[[nbsp]]Studies[[nbsp]]and[[nbsp]]private[[nbsp]]support.[[nbsp]]The[[nbsp]]gallery[[nbsp]]currently[[nbsp]]hosts[[nbsp]]four[[nbsp]]exhibits[[nbsp]]per[[nbsp]]year.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2005-02-13 21:31:32JevanGraylinked Hart Hall <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Carl Gorman Museum<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 2: </td> <td> Line 2: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ||1316 Hart Hall|| </td> <td> <span>+</span> ||1316 <span>["</span>Hart Hall<span>"]</span>|| </td> </tr> </table> </div> Carl Gorman Museumhttp://daviswiki.org/Carl_Gorman_Museum2005-02-13 21:27:25SteveDavison <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Carl Gorman Museum<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ||&lt;bgcolor='#E0E0FF'&gt;'''Location'''||<br> + ||1316 Hart Hall||<br> + ||&lt;bgcolor='#E0E0FF'&gt;'''Hours'''||<br> + ||Mon-Wed, Fri 11-4PM||<br> + ||&lt;bgcolor='#E0E0FF'&gt;'''Phone'''||<br> + ||530-752-6567||<br> + ||&lt;bgcolor='#E0E0FF'&gt;'''Website'''||<br> + ||[http://gormanmuseum.ucdavis.edu]||<br> + <br> + The Carl Gorman Museum is one of only a few galleries in the nation featuring contemporary Native American Art. It is named after Carl Nelson Gorman, a Navajo artist and advocate, and a founding faculty member of the Native American Studies Department at U.C. Davis. Founded in 1973, it is funded by the UCD Department of Native American Studies and private support. The gallery currently hosts four exhibits per year.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div>