Recent Changes for "Christianity" - Davis Wikihttp://daviswiki.org/ChristianityRecent Changes of the page "Christianity" on Davis Wiki.en-us Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2013-11-12 20:07:36RaúlRomero <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p>No differences found!</div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2013-11-12 19:39:35RaúlRomero <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 48: </td> <td> Line 48: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- Many</span> Protestant<span>&nbsp;and</span> Catholic Christians have labeled these groups as heretics<span>&nbsp;or cults</span>.<span>&nbsp;Whether they are or not, depends on your understanding of Christianity.<br> - </span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> Protestant<span>,</span> Catholic<span>, and Orthodox</span> Christians have labeled these groups as heretics. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2013-02-07 14:10:32KarlJohnson(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 57: </td> <td> Line 57: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Simply stated, these Christian groups lack any regional or national organized structure. The terms “''Evangelical''” (which is not to be confused with Evangelist), “''Fundamental''”, “''Charismatic''” and, “''Pentecostal''” all refer to groups within this Non-Denominational classification. Non-Denominational Churches are derived from Protestant Churches and many individual churches vary in their styles of worship according to their influences. As a result, people have often grouped these churches within the realm of Protestantism, but this is misnomer. These Churches have a wide amount of autonomy and while individual churches may collectively affiliate with one another, they don’t exert the same control established denominations have on their congregations. Thus they are different from Protestant groups that have a national structure and a tradition of sorts. <span>Most</span> Non-Denominational <span>churches focus on scri</span>p<span>ture alone and reject most forms</span> of Christian<span>&nbsp;Tradition</span>. <span>Their ser</span>v<span>ices tend to re</span>v<span>olve around a lengthy sermon</span> w<span>ith </span>b<span>ible quoting and perhaps a memorial service of the “Lord’s Supper” (Also called the Eucharist, Holy Communion, and/or Communion of course depending on the beliefs of the particular</span> Protestant <span>Tradition)</span>.<span>&nbsp;Pentecostal Churches are the largest movement within this tent of Christianity, focusing on the gifts of the Holy Spirit: prophesying, speaking in tongues, exorcisms, and healing. Non-Denominational Churches are the fastest growing group of Christians in the United States. Proposed theories have been a general disaffection with the authority of hierarchy, a return to the fundamentals and general conservatism which is in direct contrast to the liberalizing of many Protestant Denominations.</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> Simply stated, these Christian groups lack any regional or national organized structure. The terms “''Evangelical''” (which is not to be confused with Evangelist), “''Fundamental''”, “''Charismatic''” and, “''Pentecostal''” all refer to groups within this Non-Denominational classification. Non-Denominational Churches are derived from Protestant Churches and many individual churches vary in their styles of worship according to their influences. As a result, people have often grouped these churches within the realm of Protestantism, but this is misnomer. These Churches have a wide amount of autonomy and while individual churches may collectively affiliate with one another, they don’t exert the same control established denominations have on their congregations. Thus they are different from Protestant groups that have a national structure and a tradition of sorts. <span>Pentecostal Churches are the largest movement within this tent of Christianity, focusing on the gifts of the Holy Spirit: prophesying, speaking in tongues, exorcisms, and healing.</span> Non-Denominational <span>Churches are the fastest growing grou</span>p of Christian<span>s in the United States</span>. <span>Proposed theories ha</span>v<span>e been a general disaffection with the authority of hierarchy, a return to the fundamentals and general conser</span>v<span>atism</span> w<span>hich is in direct contrast to the li</span>b<span>eralizing of many</span> Protestant <span>Denominations</span>. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2013-02-07 14:07:55KarlJohnson <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 62: </td> <td> Line 62: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- </span> ["Campus Crusade for Christ"], ["Intervarsity Christian Fellowship"], ["Davis Christian Fellowship"] and ["Mustard Seed Ministry"] are some famous examples of Non-Denominational groups on camps. Intervarsity and Campus Crusade are by far the two largest groups. </td> <td> <span>+</span> ["Campus Crusade for Christ"], ["Intervarsity Christian Fellowship"], ["Davis Christian Fellowship"] and ["Mustard Seed Ministry"] are some famous examples of Non-Denominational groups on camps. Intervarsity and Campus Crusade are by far the two largest groups. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2013-02-07 14:07:15KarlJohnsonUnsubstantiated conjecture based on loose stereotypes <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 60: </td> <td> Line 60: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- There are many Non-Denominational Christians in Davis, perhaps more then the other groups put together. They are certainly the most vocal. Some examples of these churches include The ["Davis Christian Assembly"], ["Davis Korean Church"], ["Calvary Chapel Davis"], and ["Discovery Christian Church"].</span> </td> <td> <span>+ There are many Non-Denominational Christians in Davis, perhaps more then the other groups put together. Some examples of these churches include The ["Davis Christian Assembly"], ["Davis Korean Church"], ["Calvary Chapel Davis"], and ["Discovery Christian Church"].</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 62: </td> <td> Line 62: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- On Campus, this group of Christians tends to be very vocal about social injustices and staunch supporters of conservatism. Often you will find them with arms in the air, shuffling around and speaking out loud in worship services at various places on campus. Notable differences in prayer from Protestants and Catholics are their repetition of and sometimes unnecessary interjection of God’s name in random places during prayer. ["Campus Crusade for Christ"], ["Intervarsity Christian Fellowship"], ["Davis Christian Fellowship"] and ["Mustard Seed Ministry"] are some famous examples of Non-Denominational groups on camps. Intervarsity and Campus Crusade are by far the two largest groups. Partly the attraction to these groups is their wide acceptance of Christian backgrounds and disassociation with any one group of Christians making them widely inclusive.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ ["Campus Crusade for Christ"], ["Intervarsity Christian Fellowship"], ["Davis Christian Fellowship"] and ["Mustard Seed Ministry"] are some famous examples of Non-Denominational groups on camps. Intervarsity and Campus Crusade are by far the two largest groups.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-12-25 17:58:06BruceHansenChristmas, holiday links; description change <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> '''Christianity''' is a monotheistic ["religion"] based upon the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth, a Jewish mystic who taught in the first century CE. Most Christians believe that Jesus was sent to Earth by God <span>to die as sacrifice so</span> God <span>could fo</span>rgi<span>ve sinners of their wron</span>g<span>doin</span>g. <span>Christians usually believe that Jesus was God in human form, that his mother was a virgin at the time of his birth, and that he was the Messiah foretold by Jewish prophesy, sent to free the Jews.</span> Symbols associated with Christianity include the [wiki:wikipedia:"Christian cross" cross], [wiki:wikipedia:crucifix], [wiki:wikipedia:ichthys] ("Jesus fish"), and [wiki:wikipedia:"Holy spirit#Symbols of the Holy Spirit" dove]. </td> <td> <span>+</span> '''Christianity''' is a monotheistic ["religion"] based upon the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth, a Jewish mystic who taught in the first century CE. <span>&nbsp;</span>Most Christians believe that Jesus was sent to Earth by God <span>his Father to save sinful humanity. Christians usually believe that Jesus was</span> God <span>in human form, that his mother was a vi</span>rgi<span>n at the time of his birth, and that he was the Messiah foretold by Jewish prophesy, sent to free the Jews. ["Christmas"] is the bi</span>gg<span>est ["holidays" holiday]</span>. Symbols associated with Christianity include the [wiki:wikipedia:"Christian cross" cross], [wiki:wikipedia:crucifix], [wiki:wikipedia:ichthys] ("Jesus fish"), and [wiki:wikipedia:"Holy spirit#Symbols of the Holy Spirit" dove]. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-11-20 16:14:26JabberWokkyCertainly better... and should be worth keeping as a starting point. Rewrite it. <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> '''Christianity''' is a <span>family of </span>monotheistic ["religion"]<span>s</span> based upon the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth, a Jewish mystic who taught in the first century CE. Most Christians believe that Jesus was sent to Earth by God to die as sacrifice so God could forgive sinners of their wrongdoing. Christians usually believe that Jesus was God in human form, that his mother was a virgin at the time of his birth, and that he was the Messiah foretold by Jewish prophesy, sent to free the Jews. Symbols associated with Christianity include the [wiki:wikipedia:"Christian cross" cross], [wiki:wikipedia:crucifix], [wiki:wikipedia:ichthys] ("Jesus fish"), and [wiki:wikipedia:"Holy spirit#Symbols of the Holy Spirit" dove]. </td> <td> <span>+</span> '''Christianity''' is a monotheistic ["religion"] based upon the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth, a Jewish mystic who taught in the first century CE. Most Christians believe that Jesus was sent to Earth by God to die as sacrifice so God could forgive sinners of their wrongdoing. Christians usually believe that Jesus was God in human form, that his mother was a virgin at the time of his birth, and that he was the Messiah foretold by Jewish prophesy, sent to free the Jews. Symbols associated with Christianity include the [wiki:wikipedia:"Christian cross" cross], [wiki:wikipedia:crucifix], [wiki:wikipedia:ichthys] ("Jesus fish"), and [wiki:wikipedia:"Holy spirit#Symbols of the Holy Spirit" dove]. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- Christianity has had many disputes over its beliefs, resulting in a family of similar religions that share a common origin, rather than one uniform religion. Members of some "branches" of Christianity do not believe that some other branches are also part of that family of religions (for example, because they diverge too strongly from the beliefs and rituals of their own branch). Most of the major ones are represented in Davis, see ["Churches"] for a (hopefully) complete list. Broadly speaking, Christianity can be divided into Catholicism and Orthodoxy; and Protestantism.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ Christianity has had many disputes over the specifics of beliefs resulting in many variations, often called denominations. Broadly speaking, Christianity can be divided into Catholicism, Orthodoxy, and Protestantism, although that's a very simplistic overview. Some denominations are loosely bound by a set of common beliefs (Baptist congregations), some are so similar that they often worship together (Chaldean Catholics and Roman Catholics). Some even have a tradition of constantly splitting into new groups due to minor disagreements as matter of practicing their faith (Amish). Most practitioners believe that all who follow Jesus are Christians, while other, more finicky types are more specific and consider certain denominations (or, in extreme cases, all denominations other than their own) to be non-Christian. Most major denominations are represented in Davis, see ["Churches"] for a (hopefully) complete list.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-11-20 16:00:04JabberWokkyRevert to version 46 (Temporary revert (am editing -- hang on a sec, William)). <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> '''Christianity''' is a monotheistic ["religion"] based upon the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth, a Jewish mystic who taught in the first century CE. Most Christians believe that Jesus was sent to Earth by God to die as sacrifice so God could forgive sinners of their wrongdoing. Christians usually believe that Jesus was God in human form, that his mother was a virgin at the time of his birth, and that he was the Messiah foretold by Jewish prophesy, sent to free the Jews. Symbols associated with Christianity include the [wiki:wikipedia:"Christian cross" cross], [wiki:wikipedia:crucifix], [wiki:wikipedia:ichthys] ("Jesus fish"), and [wiki:wikipedia:"Holy spirit#Symbols of the Holy Spirit" dove]. </td> <td> <span>+</span> '''Christianity''' is a <span>family of </span>monotheistic ["religion"]<span>s</span> based upon the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth, a Jewish mystic who taught in the first century CE. Most Christians believe that Jesus was sent to Earth by God to die as sacrifice so God could forgive sinners of their wrongdoing. Christians usually believe that Jesus was God in human form, that his mother was a virgin at the time of his birth, and that he was the Messiah foretold by Jewish prophesy, sent to free the Jews. Symbols associated with Christianity include the [wiki:wikipedia:"Christian cross" cross], [wiki:wikipedia:crucifix], [wiki:wikipedia:ichthys] ("Jesus fish"), and [wiki:wikipedia:"Holy spirit#Symbols of the Holy Spirit" dove]. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Christianity has had many disputes over its beliefs, resulting in <span>many different forms</span>. Most of the major ones are represented in Davis, see ["Churches"] for a (hopefully) complete list. Broadly speaking, Christianity can be divided into Catholicism and Orthodoxy; and Protestantism. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Christianity has had many disputes over its beliefs, resulting in <span>a family of similar religions that share a common origin, rather than one uniform religion</span>.<span>&nbsp;Members of some "branches" of Christianity do not believe that some other branches are also part of that family of religions (for example, because they diverge too strongly from the beliefs and rituals of their own branch). </span> Most of the major ones are represented in Davis, see ["Churches"] for a (hopefully) complete list. Broadly speaking, Christianity can be divided into Catholicism and Orthodoxy; and Protestantism. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-11-20 15:57:58WilliamLewisRevert to version 44 (And it uses wrong terminology and misrepresents things.). <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> '''Christianity''' is a <span>family of </span>monotheistic ["religion"]<span>s</span> based upon the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth, a Jewish mystic who taught in the first century CE. Most Christians believe that Jesus was sent to Earth by God to die as sacrifice so God could forgive sinners of their wrongdoing. Christians usually believe that Jesus was God in human form, that his mother was a virgin at the time of his birth, and that he was the Messiah foretold by Jewish prophesy, sent to free the Jews. Symbols associated with Christianity include the [wiki:wikipedia:"Christian cross" cross], [wiki:wikipedia:crucifix], [wiki:wikipedia:ichthys] ("Jesus fish"), and [wiki:wikipedia:"Holy spirit#Symbols of the Holy Spirit" dove]. </td> <td> <span>+</span> '''Christianity''' is a monotheistic ["religion"] based upon the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth, a Jewish mystic who taught in the first century CE. Most Christians believe that Jesus was sent to Earth by God to die as sacrifice so God could forgive sinners of their wrongdoing. Christians usually believe that Jesus was God in human form, that his mother was a virgin at the time of his birth, and that he was the Messiah foretold by Jewish prophesy, sent to free the Jews. Symbols associated with Christianity include the [wiki:wikipedia:"Christian cross" cross], [wiki:wikipedia:crucifix], [wiki:wikipedia:ichthys] ("Jesus fish"), and [wiki:wikipedia:"Holy spirit#Symbols of the Holy Spirit" dove]. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Christianity has had many disputes over its beliefs, resulting in <span>a family of similar religions that share a common origin, rather than one uniform religion</span>.<span>&nbsp;Members of some "branches" of Christianity do not believe that some other branches are also part of that family of religions (for example, because they diverge too strongly from the beliefs and rituals of their own branch). </span> Most of the major ones are represented in Davis, see ["Churches"] for a (hopefully) complete list. Broadly speaking, Christianity can be divided into Catholicism and Orthodoxy; and Protestantism. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Christianity has had many disputes over its beliefs, resulting in <span>many different forms</span>. Most of the major ones are represented in Davis, see ["Churches"] for a (hopefully) complete list. Broadly speaking, Christianity can be divided into Catholicism and Orthodoxy; and Protestantism. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-11-20 15:47:04JabberWokkyRevert to version 43 (This seems balance balance between removal and dominating.). <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> '''Christianity''' is a monotheistic ["religion"] based upon the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth, a Jewish mystic who taught in the first century CE. Most Christians believe that Jesus was sent to Earth by God to die as sacrifice so God could forgive sinners of their wrongdoing. Christians usually believe that Jesus was God in human form, that his mother was a virgin at the time of his birth, and that he was the Messiah foretold by Jewish prophesy, sent to free the Jews. Symbols associated with Christianity include the [wiki:wikipedia:"Christian cross" cross], [wiki:wikipedia:crucifix], [wiki:wikipedia:ichthys] ("Jesus fish"), and [wiki:wikipedia:"Holy spirit#Symbols of the Holy Spirit" dove]. </td> <td> <span>+</span> '''Christianity''' is a <span>family of </span>monotheistic ["religion"]<span>s</span> based upon the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth, a Jewish mystic who taught in the first century CE. Most Christians believe that Jesus was sent to Earth by God to die as sacrifice so God could forgive sinners of their wrongdoing. Christians usually believe that Jesus was God in human form, that his mother was a virgin at the time of his birth, and that he was the Messiah foretold by Jewish prophesy, sent to free the Jews. Symbols associated with Christianity include the [wiki:wikipedia:"Christian cross" cross], [wiki:wikipedia:crucifix], [wiki:wikipedia:ichthys] ("Jesus fish"), and [wiki:wikipedia:"Holy spirit#Symbols of the Holy Spirit" dove]. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Christianity has had many disputes over its beliefs, resulting in <span>many different forms</span>. Most of the major ones are represented in Davis, see ["Churches"] for a (hopefully) complete list. Broadly speaking, Christianity can be divided into Catholicism and Orthodoxy; and Protestantism. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Christianity has had many disputes over its beliefs, resulting in <span>a family of similar religions that share a common origin, rather than one uniform religion</span>.<span>&nbsp;Members of some "branches" of Christianity do not believe that some other branches are also part of that family of religions (for example, because they diverge too strongly from the beliefs and rituals of their own branch). </span> Most of the major ones are represented in Davis, see ["Churches"] for a (hopefully) complete list. Broadly speaking, Christianity can be divided into Catholicism and Orthodoxy; and Protestantism. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 47: </td> <td> Line 47: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- '''Warning:''' Although these groups are categorized and placed under the heading of Christianity, some of the groups mentioned in this section such as: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, Jehovah’s Witnesses, etc. are not considered Christian by some established religions. These religions do bear general similarities to Christianity, but they reject many dogmas and doctrines thought essential by many Christians. Since these religions do share general similarities with Christianity, they are put on this page for educational purposes with this warning attached. This warning is not meant to offend anyone but merely for educational purposes, if you happen to disagree with the warning, do not delete it, but do some research of your own, before messing with this warning.<br> - </span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-11-20 13:54:36RSTstudent <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 47: </td> <td> Line 47: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ '''Warning:''' Although these groups are categorized and placed under the heading of Christianity, some of the groups mentioned in this section such as: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, Jehovah’s Witnesses, etc. are not considered Christian by some established religions. These religions do bear general similarities to Christianity, but they reject many dogmas and doctrines thought essential by many Christians. Since these religions do share general similarities with Christianity, they are put on this page for educational purposes with this warning attached. This warning is not meant to offend anyone but merely for educational purposes, if you happen to disagree with the warning, do not delete it, but do some research of your own, before messing with this warning.<br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-11-20 12:19:40WilliamLewisfixing damage. Lutheranism and Roman Catholicism are different _sects_ <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> '''Christianity''' is a <span>family of </span>monotheistic ["religion"]<span>s</span> based upon the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth, a Jewish mystic who taught in the first century CE. Most Christians believe that Jesus was sent to Earth by God to die as sacrifice so God could forgive sinners of their wrongdoing. Christians usually believe that Jesus was God in human form, that his mother was a virgin at the time of his birth, and that he was the Messiah foretold by Jewish prophesy, sent to free the Jews. Symbols associated with Christianity include the [wiki:wikipedia:"Christian cross" cross], [wiki:wikipedia:crucifix], [wiki:wikipedia:ichthys] ("Jesus fish"), and [wiki:wikipedia:"Holy spirit#Symbols of the Holy Spirit" dove]. </td> <td> <span>+</span> '''Christianity''' is a monotheistic ["religion"] based upon the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth, a Jewish mystic who taught in the first century CE. Most Christians believe that Jesus was sent to Earth by God to die as sacrifice so God could forgive sinners of their wrongdoing. Christians usually believe that Jesus was God in human form, that his mother was a virgin at the time of his birth, and that he was the Messiah foretold by Jewish prophesy, sent to free the Jews. Symbols associated with Christianity include the [wiki:wikipedia:"Christian cross" cross], [wiki:wikipedia:crucifix], [wiki:wikipedia:ichthys] ("Jesus fish"), and [wiki:wikipedia:"Holy spirit#Symbols of the Holy Spirit" dove]. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Christianity has had many disputes over its beliefs, resulting in <span>a family of similar religions that share a common origin, rather than one uniform religion</span>.<span>&nbsp;Members of some "branches" of Christianity do not believe that some other branches are also part of that family of religions (for example, because they diverge too strongly from the beliefs and rituals of their own branch). </span> Most of the major ones are represented in Davis, see ["Churches"] for a (hopefully) complete list. Broadly speaking, Christianity can be divided into Catholicism and Orthodoxy; and Protestantism. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Christianity has had many disputes over its beliefs, resulting in <span>many different forms</span>. Most of the major ones are represented in Davis, see ["Churches"] for a (hopefully) complete list. Broadly speaking, Christianity can be divided into Catholicism and Orthodoxy; and Protestantism. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-11-20 08:51:34IDoNotExist <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> '''Christianity''' is a monotheistic ["religion"] based upon the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth, a Jewish mystic who taught in the first century CE. Most Christians believe that Jesus was sent to Earth by God to die as sacrifice so God could forgive sinners of their wrongdoing. Christians usually believe that Jesus was God in human form, that his mother was a virgin at the time of his birth, and that he was the Messiah foretold by Jewish prophesy, sent to free the Jews. Symbols associated with Christianity include the [wiki:wikipedia:"Christian cross" cross], [wiki:wikipedia:crucifix], [wiki:wikipedia:ichthys] ("Jesus fish"), and [wiki:wikipedia:"Holy spirit#Symbols of the Holy Spirit" dove]. </td> <td> <span>+</span> '''Christianity''' is a <span>family of </span>monotheistic ["religion"]<span>s</span> based upon the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth, a Jewish mystic who taught in the first century CE. Most Christians believe that Jesus was sent to Earth by God to die as sacrifice so God could forgive sinners of their wrongdoing. Christians usually believe that Jesus was God in human form, that his mother was a virgin at the time of his birth, and that he was the Messiah foretold by Jewish prophesy, sent to free the Jews. Symbols associated with Christianity include the [wiki:wikipedia:"Christian cross" cross], [wiki:wikipedia:crucifix], [wiki:wikipedia:ichthys] ("Jesus fish"), and [wiki:wikipedia:"Holy spirit#Symbols of the Holy Spirit" dove]. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Christianity has had many disputes over its beliefs, resulting in <span>many different forms</span>. Most of the major ones are represented in Davis, see ["Churches"] for a (hopefully) complete list. Broadly speaking, Christianity can be divided into Catholicism and Orthodoxy; and Protestantism. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Christianity has had many disputes over its beliefs, resulting in <span>a family of similar religions that share a common origin, rather than one uniform religion</span>.<span>&nbsp;Members of some "branches" of Christianity do not believe that some other branches are also part of that family of religions (for example, because they diverge too strongly from the beliefs and rituals of their own branch). </span> Most of the major ones are represented in Davis, see ["Churches"] for a (hopefully) complete list. Broadly speaking, Christianity can be divided into Catholicism and Orthodoxy; and Protestantism. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 32: </td> <td> Line 32: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- <br> - '''Warning:''' Although these groups are categorized and placed under the heading of Christianity, some of the groups mentioned in this section such as: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, Jehovah’s Witnesses, etc. are not considered Christian by some established religions. These religions do bear general similarities to Christianity, but they reject many dogmas and doctrines thought essential by many Christians. Since these religions do share general similarities with Christianity, they are put on this page for educational purposes with this warning attached. This warning is not meant to offend anyone but merely for educational purposes, if you happen to disagree with the warning, do not delete it, but do some research of your own, before messing with this warning.</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-11-20 08:20:01SueHjerpemaybe a little less offensive <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 33: </td> <td> Line 33: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- '''Warning:''' Although these groups have been categorized and placed under the heading of Christianity, it is very important to note that some of the groups mentioned in this section such as: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, Jehovah’s Witnesses, etc. do not right fully belong under the heading of Christianity, as they are not Christian religions. These religions do bear some general similarities to Christianity, but they reject many dogmas and doctrines essential to the Christian faith without which they are simply believers of a religion, which attempts to imitate Christianity. However, because there religions do share some general similarities with Christianity, they should be left on this page for educational purposes with this warning attached. This warning is not meant to offend anyone but merely for educational purposes, if you happen to disagree with the warning, do not delete it, but do some research of your own, before messing with this warning.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ '''Warning:''' Although these groups are categorized and placed under the heading of Christianity, some of the groups mentioned in this section such as: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, Jehovah’s Witnesses, etc. are not considered Christian by some established religions. These religions do bear general similarities to Christianity, but they reject many dogmas and doctrines thought essential by many Christians. Since these religions do share general similarities with Christianity, they are put on this page for educational purposes with this warning attached. This warning is not meant to offend anyone but merely for educational purposes, if you happen to disagree with the warning, do not delete it, but do some research of your own, before messing with this warning.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-11-20 06:28:31RSTstudent <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 59: </td> <td> Line 59: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Simply stated, these Christian groups lack any regional or national organized structure. The terms “''Evangelical''” (which is not to be confused with Evangelist), “''Fundamental''”, “''Charismatic''” and, “''Pentecostal''” all refer to groups within this Non-Denominational classification. Non-Denominational Churches are derived from Protestant Churches and many individual churches vary in their styles of worship according to their influences. As a result, people have often grouped these churches within the realm of Protestantism, but this is misnomer. These Churches have a wide amount of autonomy and while individual churches may collectively affiliate with one another, they don’t exert the same control established denominations have on their congregations. Thus they are different from Protestant groups that have a national structure and a tradition of sorts. Most Non-Denominational churches focus on scripture alone and reject most forms of Christian Tradition. Their services tend to revolve around a lengthy sermon with bible quoting and perhaps a memorial service of the “Lord’s Supper” (Also called the Eucharist and/or <span>Holy </span>Communion). Pentecostal Churches are the largest movement within this tent of Christianity, focusing on the gifts of the Holy Spirit: prophesying, speaking in tongues, exorcisms, and healing. Non-Denominational Churches are the fastest growing group of Christians in the United States. Proposed theories have been a general disaffection with the authority of hierarchy, a return to the fundamentals and general conservatism which is in direct contrast to the liberalizing of many Protestant Denominations. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Simply stated, these Christian groups lack any regional or national organized structure. The terms “''Evangelical''” (which is not to be confused with Evangelist), “''Fundamental''”, “''Charismatic''” and, “''Pentecostal''” all refer to groups within this Non-Denominational classification. Non-Denominational Churches are derived from Protestant Churches and many individual churches vary in their styles of worship according to their influences. As a result, people have often grouped these churches within the realm of Protestantism, but this is misnomer. These Churches have a wide amount of autonomy and while individual churches may collectively affiliate with one another, they don’t exert the same control established denominations have on their congregations. Thus they are different from Protestant groups that have a national structure and a tradition of sorts. Most Non-Denominational churches focus on scripture alone and reject most forms of Christian Tradition. Their services tend to revolve around a lengthy sermon with bible quoting and perhaps a memorial service of the “Lord’s Supper” (Also called the Eucharist<span>, Holy Communion,</span> and/or Commun<span>ion of course depending on the beliefs of the particular Protestant Tradit</span>ion). Pentecostal Churches are the largest movement within this tent of Christianity, focusing on the gifts of the Holy Spirit: prophesying, speaking in tongues, exorcisms, and healing. Non-Denominational Churches are the fastest growing group of Christians in the United States. Proposed theories have been a general disaffection with the authority of hierarchy, a return to the fundamentals and general conservatism which is in direct contrast to the liberalizing of many Protestant Denominations. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-11-20 06:20:07RSTstudent <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 33: </td> <td> Line 33: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> '''Warning:''' Although these groups have been categorized and placed under the heading of Christianity, it is very important to note that some of the groups mentioned in this section such as: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, Jehovah’s Witnesses, etc. do not right fully belong under the heading of Christianity, as they are not Christian religions. These religions do bear some general similarities to Christianity, but they reject many dogmas and doctrines essential to the Christian faith without which they are simply believers of a religion, which attempts to imitate Christianity. </td> <td> <span>+</span> '''Warning:''' Although these groups have been categorized and placed under the heading of Christianity, it is very important to note that some of the groups mentioned in this section such as: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, Jehovah’s Witnesses, etc. do not right fully belong under the heading of Christianity, as they are not Christian religions. These religions do bear some general similarities to Christianity, but they reject many dogmas and doctrines essential to the Christian faith without which they are simply believers of a religion, which attempts to imitate Christianity.<span>&nbsp;However, because there religions do share some general similarities with Christianity, they should be left on this page for educational purposes with this warning attached. This warning is not meant to offend anyone but merely for educational purposes, if you happen to disagree with the warning, do not delete it, but do some research of your own, before messing with this warning.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-11-20 06:03:50RSTstudent <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p>No differences found!</div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-11-20 06:03:33RSTstudent <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 33: </td> <td> Line 33: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ '''Warning:''' Although these groups have been categorized and placed under the heading of Christianity, it is very important to note that some of the groups mentioned in this section such as: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, Jehovah’s Witnesses, etc. do not right fully belong under the heading of Christianity, as they are not Christian religions. These religions do bear some general similarities to Christianity, but they reject many dogmas and doctrines essential to the Christian faith without which they are simply believers of a religion, which attempts to imitate Christianity.<br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-07-23 19:35:59JasonAllerRevert to version 35 (and the Lord called out to them and said, "Enough already".). <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 57: </td> <td> Line 57: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Simply stated, these Christian groups lack any regional or national organized structure. The terms “''Evangelical''” (which is not to be confused with Evangelist), “''Fundamental''”, “''Charismatic''” and, “''Pentecostal''” all refer to groups within this Non-Denominational classification. Non-Denominational Churches are derived from Protestant Churches and many individual churches vary in their styles of worship according to their influences. As a result, people have often grouped these churches within the realm of Protestantism, but this is misnomer. These Churches have a wide amount of autonomy and while individual churches may collectively affiliate with one another, they don’t exert the same control established denominations have on their congregations. Thus they are different from Protestant groups that have a national structure and a tradition of sorts. Most Non-Denominational churches focus on scripture alone and reject most forms of Christian Tradition. Their services tend to revolve around a lengthy sermon with bible quoting and perhaps a memorial service of the “Lord’s Supper” (Also called Communion). Pentecostal Churches are the largest movement within this tent of Christianity, focusing on the gifts of the Holy Spirit: prophesying, speaking in tongues, exorcisms, and healing. Non-Denominational Churches are the fastest growing group of Christians in the United States. Proposed theories have been a general disaffection with the authority of hierarchy, a return to the fundamentals and general conservatism which is in direct contrast to the liberalizing of many Protestant Denominations. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Simply stated, these Christian groups lack any regional or national organized structure. The terms “''Evangelical''” (which is not to be confused with Evangelist), “''Fundamental''”, “''Charismatic''” and, “''Pentecostal''” all refer to groups within this Non-Denominational classification. Non-Denominational Churches are derived from Protestant Churches and many individual churches vary in their styles of worship according to their influences. As a result, people have often grouped these churches within the realm of Protestantism, but this is misnomer. These Churches have a wide amount of autonomy and while individual churches may collectively affiliate with one another, they don’t exert the same control established denominations have on their congregations. Thus they are different from Protestant groups that have a national structure and a tradition of sorts. Most Non-Denominational churches focus on scripture alone and reject most forms of Christian Tradition. Their services tend to revolve around a lengthy sermon with bible quoting and perhaps a memorial service of the “Lord’s Supper” (Also called <span>the Eucharist and/or Holy </span>Communion). Pentecostal Churches are the largest movement within this tent of Christianity, focusing on the gifts of the Holy Spirit: prophesying, speaking in tongues, exorcisms, and healing. Non-Denominational Churches are the fastest growing group of Christians in the United States. Proposed theories have been a general disaffection with the authority of hierarchy, a return to the fundamentals and general conservatism which is in direct contrast to the liberalizing of many Protestant Denominations. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-07-23 17:54:36Lightworker318 <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 57: </td> <td> Line 57: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Simply stated, these Christian groups lack any regional or national organized structure. The terms “''Evangelical''” (which is not to be confused with Evangelist), “''Fundamental''”, “''Charismatic''” and, “''Pentecostal''” all refer to groups within this Non-Denominational classification. Non-Denominational Churches are derived from Protestant Churches and many individual churches vary in their styles of worship according to their influences. As a result, people have often grouped these churches within the realm of Protestantism, but this is misnomer. These Churches have a wide amount of autonomy and while individual churches may collectively affiliate with one another, they don’t exert the same control established denominations have on their congregations. Thus they are different from Protestant groups that have a national structure and a tradition of sorts. Most Non-Denominational churches focus on scripture alone and reject most forms of Christian Tradition. Their services tend to revolve around a lengthy sermon with bible quoting and perhaps a memorial service of the “Lord’s Supper” (Also called <span>the Eucharist and/or Holy </span>Communion). Pentecostal Churches are the largest movement within this tent of Christianity, focusing on the gifts of the Holy Spirit: prophesying, speaking in tongues, exorcisms, and healing. Non-Denominational Churches are the fastest growing group of Christians in the United States. Proposed theories have been a general disaffection with the authority of hierarchy, a return to the fundamentals and general conservatism which is in direct contrast to the liberalizing of many Protestant Denominations. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Simply stated, these Christian groups lack any regional or national organized structure. The terms “''Evangelical''” (which is not to be confused with Evangelist), “''Fundamental''”, “''Charismatic''” and, “''Pentecostal''” all refer to groups within this Non-Denominational classification. Non-Denominational Churches are derived from Protestant Churches and many individual churches vary in their styles of worship according to their influences. As a result, people have often grouped these churches within the realm of Protestantism, but this is misnomer. These Churches have a wide amount of autonomy and while individual churches may collectively affiliate with one another, they don’t exert the same control established denominations have on their congregations. Thus they are different from Protestant groups that have a national structure and a tradition of sorts. Most Non-Denominational churches focus on scripture alone and reject most forms of Christian Tradition. Their services tend to revolve around a lengthy sermon with bible quoting and perhaps a memorial service of the “Lord’s Supper” (Also called Communion). Pentecostal Churches are the largest movement within this tent of Christianity, focusing on the gifts of the Holy Spirit: prophesying, speaking in tongues, exorcisms, and healing. Non-Denominational Churches are the fastest growing group of Christians in the United States. Proposed theories have been a general disaffection with the authority of hierarchy, a return to the fundamentals and general conservatism which is in direct contrast to the liberalizing of many Protestant Denominations. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-07-13 11:15:21WilliamLewisjust some notes... <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 4: </td> <td> Line 4: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + ## The stuff below needs to be reorganized with non-denominationalism and restorationism under protestantism. I mean.... landmark baptists don't like being called protestant, but they will certainly say their theology is very close to non-landmark baptists who do claim protestantism. Also, the solas are a bit overemphasized. The Lutherans care about it and so do Catholics when expounding the heresies of protestants, but not even all protestants hold them as articles of faith!</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-07-13 11:09:04WilliamLewisTrying to make this less jargony... will work on the second para later <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Christianity has had many disputes over its beliefs, resulting in many different forms. Most of the major ones are represented in Davis, see ["Churches"] for a (hopefully) complete list. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Christianity has had many disputes over its beliefs, resulting in many different forms. Most of the major ones are represented in Davis, see ["Churches"] for a (hopefully) complete list.<span>&nbsp;Broadly speaking, Christianity can be divided into Catholicism and Orthodoxy; and Protestantism.</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 5: </td> <td> Line 5: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- Theologians usually break Christianity down into three or four sects or branches wherein all denominations fall under. The following will provide a brief overview of each sect, with examples and places of worship in Davis.</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 11: </td> <td> Line 10: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + Catholic is a term that means "universal." In the early days of Christianity, Jesus' followers (called apostles) traveled all over the world spreading Jesus' teachings and founded many local churches, each lead by a bishop. The term "catholic," then, referred to the greater church formed of the collection these smaller churches. While these churches were largely independent, the bishops would meet up as needed to settle issues of faith, such as beliefs about who Jesus was and how Christians should live. Since Jesus designated Peter, the first Bishop of Rome (now known as "the Pope"), as his successor, the Bishop of Rome became increasingly powerful. The churches now known as Eastern Orthodox [wiki:wikipedia:"Great schism" split] away from what is now the Roman Catholic church over the the extent of the Pope's authority over other churches (among other things). Though the split was bitter, Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholics probably have more in common with each other than any of the other branches of Christianity.<br> + <br> + ## please rewrite this paragraph to make more sense to someone who doesn't know all the jesus jargon. Also, how much of this is relevant in a general overview?</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-07-13 10:31:39WilliamLewis <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> '''Christianity''' is a monotheistic ["religion"] based upon the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth, a Jewish mystic who taught in the first century CE. Most Christians believe that Jesus was sent to Earth by God to <span>be a perfect sacrifice, brin</span>ging<span>&nbsp;God's for</span>g<span>iveness to sinners</span>. Christians usually believe that Jesus was God in human form, that his mother was a virgin at the time of his birth, and that he was the Messiah foretold by Jewish prophesy, sent to <span>liberate Israel</span>. Symbols associated with Christianity include the [wiki:wikipedia:"Christian cross" cross], [wiki:wikipedia:crucifix], [wiki:wikipedia:ichthys] ("Jesus fish"), and [wiki:wikipedia:"Holy spirit#Symbols of the Holy Spirit" dove]. </td> <td> <span>+</span> '''Christianity''' is a monotheistic ["religion"] based upon the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth, a Jewish mystic who taught in the first century CE. Most Christians believe that Jesus was sent to Earth by God to <span>die as sacrifice so God could for</span>gi<span>ve sinners of their wro</span>ng<span>doin</span>g. Christians usually believe that Jesus was God in human form, that his mother was a virgin at the time of his birth, and that he was the Messiah foretold by Jewish prophesy, sent to <span>free the Jews</span>. Symbols associated with Christianity include the [wiki:wikipedia:"Christian cross" cross], [wiki:wikipedia:crucifix], [wiki:wikipedia:ichthys] ("Jesus fish"), and [wiki:wikipedia:"Holy spirit#Symbols of the Holy Spirit" dove]. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- Many different people have come up with different forms of Christianity and a large swath of them are represented in Davis.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ Christianity has had many disputes over its beliefs, resulting in many different forms. Most of the major ones are represented in Davis, see ["Churches"] for a (hopefully) complete list.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-07-13 10:23:14WilliamLewisMaking this cleaner and more relevant to Davis.... work in progress <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> '''Christianity''' is a monotheistic ["religion"] based upon the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth, a Jewish mystic who taught in the first century CE. Most Christians believe that Jesus was sent to Earth by God to be a perfect sacrifice, bringing God's forgiveness to sinners. Christians usually believe that Jesus was God in human form, that his mother was a virgin at the time of his birth, and that he was the Messiah foretold by Jewish prophesy, sent to liberate Israel. Symbols a<span>ttributed to</span> Christianity <span>are the cross (the implement of his e</span>x<span>ecution at the hands of the Romans)</span>, <span>crucifix (a cross with Jesus on it), ichthys</span> ("Jesus fish"), and dove<span>&nbsp;(symbolizing Jesus' title of "Prince of Peace")</span>. </td> <td> <span>+</span> '''Christianity''' is a monotheistic ["religion"] based upon the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth, a Jewish mystic who taught in the first century CE. Most Christians believe that Jesus was sent to Earth by God to be a perfect sacrifice, bringing God's forgiveness to sinners. Christians usually believe that Jesus was God in human form, that his mother was a virgin at the time of his birth, and that he was the Messiah foretold by Jewish prophesy, sent to liberate Israel. Symbols a<span>ssociated with</span> Christianity <span>include the [wiki:wikipedia:"Christian cross" cross], [wiki:wikipedia:crucifi</span>x<span>]</span>, <span>[wiki:wikipedia:ichthys]</span> ("Jesus fish"), and <span>[wiki:wikipedia:"Holy spirit#Symbols of the Holy Spirit" </span>dove<span>]</span>. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- Davis has a very large, active Christian population. There are dozens of different churches and groups representative of different traditions. Worldwide there are about 2.1 billion Christians with the Roman Catholic Church making up about ½ of that total.<br> - "Prior to 1990, the popularity of Christianity had been stable in the U.S. About 87% of adults identified themselves as Christians. The country then experienced a major change. Significant numbers of American adults began to disaffiliate themselves from Christianity and from other organized religions. By 2008, the percentage of Christians had reached 76% and is believed to be continuing its decline." -- [http://www.religioustolerance.org/chr_prac2.htm ReligiousTolerance.org]<br> - Catholics (approx. 25%) and Baptists make up the largest majority of Christians in the country. Christianity started as a sect within Judaism but gradually separated after the first century. Thus many Jewish texts are held sacred by Christians.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ Many different people have come up with different forms of Christianity and a large swath of them are represented in Davis.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-07-13 10:13:28WilliamLewismaking this more universal and cutting down on the jesus jargon <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- '''Christianity''' is a monotheistic ["religion"] based upon the belief that Jesus of Nazareth is the Christ, and is God. It is believed that he was born of a virgin, came to fulfill certain Jewish messianic prophecies, was crucified and died, and was fully resurrected and ascended into heaven all for the redemption of sinners. Symbols attributed to Christianity are the Cross, Crucifix, Ichthys (Fish) and Dove.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ '''Christianity''' is a monotheistic ["religion"] based upon the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth, a Jewish mystic who taught in the first century CE. Most Christians believe that Jesus was sent to Earth by God to be a perfect sacrifice, bringing God's forgiveness to sinners. Christians usually believe that Jesus was God in human form, that his mother was a virgin at the time of his birth, and that he was the Messiah foretold by Jewish prophesy, sent to liberate Israel. Symbols attributed to Christianity are the cross (the implement of his execution at the hands of the Romans), crucifix (a cross with Jesus on it), ichthys ("Jesus fish"), and dove (symbolizing Jesus' title of "Prince of Peace").</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-07-13 09:59:27WilliamLewis"Our" implies everyone, Calvinists believe in a certain elect <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> '''Christianity''' is a monotheistic ["religion"] based upon the belief that Jesus of Nazareth is the Christ, and is God. It is believed that he was born of a virgin, came to fulfill certain Jewish messianic prophecies, was crucified and died, and was fully resurrected and ascended into heaven all for <span>our</span> redemption. Symbols attributed to Christianity are the Cross, Crucifix, Ichthys (Fish) and Dove. </td> <td> <span>+</span> '''Christianity''' is a monotheistic ["religion"] based upon the belief that Jesus of Nazareth is the Christ, and is God. It is believed that he was born of a virgin, came to fulfill certain Jewish messianic prophecies, was crucified and died, and was fully resurrected and ascended into heaven all for <span>the</span> redemption<span>&nbsp;of sinners</span>. Symbols attributed to Christianity are the Cross, Crucifix, Ichthys (Fish) and Dove. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-07-13 09:48:25JabberWokky <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> '''Christianity''' is a monotheistic ["religion"] based upon the belief that Jesus of Nazareth is the Christ, and is God. It is believed that he was born of a virgin, came to fulfill <span>the</span> Jewish prophec<span>y of a Messiah</span>, was crucified and died, and was fully resurrected and ascended into heaven all for our redemption. Symbols attributed to Christianity are the Cross, Crucifix, Ichthys (Fish) and Dove. </td> <td> <span>+</span> '''Christianity''' is a monotheistic ["religion"] based upon the belief that Jesus of Nazareth is the Christ, and is God. It is believed that he was born of a virgin, came to fulfill <span>certain</span> Jewish <span>messianic </span>prophec<span>ies</span>, was crucified and died, and was fully resurrected and ascended into heaven all for our redemption. Symbols attributed to Christianity are the Cross, Crucifix, Ichthys (Fish) and Dove. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-07-13 09:45:52JabberWokkya == non proper noun. +restoration of deleted terms (eh?). <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> '''Christianity''' is a monotheistic ["religion"] based upon the belief that Jesus of Nazareth is the Christ, and is God. It is believed that he was born of a <span>V</span>irgin, came to fulfill the Jewish prophecy of a Messiah, was crucified and died, and was fully resurrected and ascended into heaven all for our redemption. Symbols attributed to Christianity are the Cross, Crucifix, Ichthys (Fish) and Dove. </td> <td> <span>+</span> '''Christianity''' is a monotheistic ["religion"] based upon the belief that Jesus of Nazareth is the Christ, and is God. It is believed that he was born of a <span>v</span>irgin, came to fulfill the Jewish prophecy of a Messiah, was crucified and died, and was fully resurrected and ascended into heaven all for our redemption. Symbols attributed to Christianity are the Cross, Crucifix, Ichthys (Fish) and Dove. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 54: </td> <td> Line 54: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Simply stated, these Christian groups lack any regional or national organized structure. The terms “''Evangelical''” (which is not to be confused with Evangelist), “''Fundamental''”, “''Charismatic''” and, “''Pentecostal''” all refer to groups within this Non-Denominational classification. Non-Denominational Churches are derived from Protestant Churches and many individual churches vary in their styles of worship according to their influences. As a result, people have often grouped these churches within the realm of Protestantism, but this is misnomer. These Churches have a wide amount of autonomy and while individual churches may collectively affiliate with one another, they don’t exert the same control established denominations have on their congregations. Thus they are different from Protestant groups that have a national structure and a tradition of sorts. Most Non-Denominational churches focus on scripture alone and reject most forms of Christian Tradition. Their services tend to revolve around a lengthy sermon with bible quoting and perhaps a memorial service of the “Lord’s Supper” (Also called Communion). Pentecostal Churches are the largest movement within this tent of Christianity, focusing on the gifts of the Holy Spirit: prophesying, speaking in tongues, exorcisms, and healing. Non-Denominational Churches are the fastest growing group of Christians in the United States. Proposed theories have been a general disaffection with the authority of hierarchy, a return to the fundamentals and general conservatism which is in direct contrast to the liberalizing of many Protestant Denominations. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Simply stated, these Christian groups lack any regional or national organized structure. The terms “''Evangelical''” (which is not to be confused with Evangelist), “''Fundamental''”, “''Charismatic''” and, “''Pentecostal''” all refer to groups within this Non-Denominational classification. Non-Denominational Churches are derived from Protestant Churches and many individual churches vary in their styles of worship according to their influences. As a result, people have often grouped these churches within the realm of Protestantism, but this is misnomer. These Churches have a wide amount of autonomy and while individual churches may collectively affiliate with one another, they don’t exert the same control established denominations have on their congregations. Thus they are different from Protestant groups that have a national structure and a tradition of sorts. Most Non-Denominational churches focus on scripture alone and reject most forms of Christian Tradition. Their services tend to revolve around a lengthy sermon with bible quoting and perhaps a memorial service of the “Lord’s Supper” (Also called <span>the Eucharist and/or Holy </span>Communion). Pentecostal Churches are the largest movement within this tent of Christianity, focusing on the gifts of the Holy Spirit: prophesying, speaking in tongues, exorcisms, and healing. Non-Denominational Churches are the fastest growing group of Christians in the United States. Proposed theories have been a general disaffection with the authority of hierarchy, a return to the fundamentals and general conservatism which is in direct contrast to the liberalizing of many Protestant Denominations. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-07-13 08:39:32CovertProfessorremoving introduction of bad grammar <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 17: </td> <td> Line 17: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> There are many Catholics that reside within ["Davis"] and who attend the ["UC Davis" university]. They are most recognizable on Ash Wednesday when they receive ashes upon their forehead as a remembrance of their physical mortality. Other distinguishing features include the making sign of the cross before prayer and or the ownership of a personal crucifix. While <span>there are</span> no Orthodox churches exist within Davis City limits, there are several parishes located in Sacramento. ["Roman Catholic" Roman Catholics] have ["St. James Catholic Church" Saint James' Catholic Church] and for students, the National Newman program is run out of the Newman Center which also conducts mass. Anglicans have ["The Episcopal Church of St. Martin" Saint Martin’s Episcopal Church] just behind the University Mall. There exist several student groups that cater to the different traditions including: The ["Orthodox Christian Fellowship"], ["Newman Center" Newman Catholic Center], and the now defunct ["Canterbury Club"] for Anglicans. The Anglican group merged with the Lutheran Fellowship a few years back, and now together cooperatively run a joint ministry. </td> <td> <span>+</span> There are many Catholics that reside within ["Davis"] and who attend the ["UC Davis" university]. They are most recognizable on Ash Wednesday when they receive ashes upon their forehead as a remembrance of their physical mortality. Other distinguishing features include the making sign of the cross before prayer and or the ownership of a personal crucifix. While no Orthodox churches exist within Davis City limits, there are several parishes located in Sacramento. ["Roman Catholic" Roman Catholics] have ["St. James Catholic Church" Saint James' Catholic Church] and for students, the National Newman program is run out of the Newman Center which also conducts mass. Anglicans have ["The Episcopal Church of St. Martin" Saint Martin’s Episcopal Church] just behind the University Mall. There exist several student groups that cater to the different traditions including: The ["Orthodox Christian Fellowship"], ["Newman Center" Newman Catholic Center], and the now defunct ["Canterbury Club"] for Anglicans. The Anglican group merged with the Lutheran Fellowship a few years back, and now together cooperatively run a joint ministry. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-07-13 03:05:24WilliamLewis(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 40: </td> <td> Line 40: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Jehovah’s Witnesses hold that shortly after the last Apostle perished, the Church became apostate and that only through the <span>literal interpretation of the b</span>ible can we understand God’s message. Jehovah Witnesses also believe in neutrality in politics, abstinence from military service and a rejection of Trinitarian Christianity. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Jehovah’s Witnesses hold that shortly after the last Apostle perished, the Church became apostate and that only through the <span>close, unbiased reading of the B</span>ible can we understand God’s message. <span>They even produced the [wiki:wikipedia:"New World Translation"] of the Bible because they felt existing translations were insufficient for the task. </span>Jehovah Witnesses also believe in neutrality in politics, abstinence from military service and a rejection of Trinitarian Christianity. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-07-13 00:20:13DonShor <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 5: </td> <td> Line 5: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Catholics (approx. 25%) and Baptists make up the largest majority of Christians in the county. Christianity started as a sect within Judaism but gradually separated after the first century. Thus many Jewish texts are held sacred by Christians. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Catholics (approx. 25%) and Baptists make up the largest majority of Christians in the count<span>r</span>y. Christianity started as a sect within Judaism but gradually separated after the first century. Thus many Jewish texts are held sacred by Christians. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-07-13 00:19:46DonShorbetter numbers <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- Davis has a very large, active Christian population. There are dozens of different churches and groups representative of different traditions. Worldwide there are about 2.1 billion Christians with the Roman Catholic Church making up about ½ of that total. In the United States 84% of residents said they practice some form of Christianity or other. Catholics and Baptists make up the largest majority of Christians in the county. Christianity started as a sect within Judaism but gradually separated after the first century. Thus many Jewish texts are held sacred by Christians.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ Davis has a very large, active Christian population. There are dozens of different churches and groups representative of different traditions. Worldwide there are about 2.1 billion Christians with the Roman Catholic Church making up about ½ of that total.<br> + "Prior to 1990, the popularity of Christianity had been stable in the U.S. About 87% of adults identified themselves as Christians. The country then experienced a major change. Significant numbers of American adults began to disaffiliate themselves from Christianity and from other organized religions. By 2008, the percentage of Christians had reached 76% and is believed to be continuing its decline." -- [http://www.religioustolerance.org/chr_prac2.htm ReligiousTolerance.org]<br> + Catholics (approx. 25%) and Baptists make up the largest majority of Christians in the county. Christianity started as a sect within Judaism but gradually separated after the first century. Thus many Jewish texts are held sacred by Christians.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-07-13 00:06:42Lightworker318 <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Davis has a very large, active Christian population. There are dozens of different churches and groups representative of different traditions. Worldwide there are about 2.1 billion Christians with the Roman Catholic Church making up about ½ of that total. In the United States <span>79</span>% of residents said they practice some form of Christianity or other. Catholics and Baptists make up the largest majority of Christians in the county. Christianity started as a sect within Judaism but gradually separated after the first century. Thus many Jewish texts are held sacred by Christians. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Davis has a very large, active Christian population. There are dozens of different churches and groups representative of different traditions. Worldwide there are about 2.1 billion Christians with the Roman Catholic Church making up about ½ of that total. In the United States <span>84</span>% of residents said they practice some form of Christianity or other. Catholics and Baptists make up the largest majority of Christians in the county. Christianity started as a sect within Judaism but gradually separated after the first century. Thus many Jewish texts are held sacred by Christians. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-07-13 00:06:07Lightworker318 <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> '''Christianity''' is a monotheistic ["religion"] based upon the belief that Jesus of Nazareth is the Christ, and is God. It is believed that he was born of a <span>v</span>irgin, came to fulfill the Jewish prophecy of a <span>m</span>essiah, was crucified and died, and was fully resurrected and ascended into heaven all for our redemption. Symbols attributed to Christianity are the Cross, Crucifix, <span>fish and d</span>ove. </td> <td> <span>+</span> '''Christianity''' is a monotheistic ["religion"] based upon the belief that Jesus of Nazareth is the Christ, and is God. It is believed that he was born of a <span>V</span>irgin, came to fulfill the Jewish prophecy of a <span>M</span>essiah, was crucified and died, and was fully resurrected and ascended into heaven all for our redemption. Symbols attributed to Christianity are the Cross, Crucifix, <span>Ichthys (Fish) and D</span>ove. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-07-13 00:02:59Lightworker318 <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 52: </td> <td> Line 52: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Simply stated, these Christian groups lack any regional or national organized structure. The terms “''Evangelical''” (which is not to be confused with Evangelist), “''Fundamental''”, “''Charismatic''” and, “''Pentecostal''” all refer to groups within this Non-Denominational classification. Non-Denominational Churches are derived from Protestant Churches and many individual churches vary in their styles of worship according to their influences. As a result, people have often grouped these churches within the realm of Protestantism, but this is misnomer. These Churches have a wide amount of autonomy and while individual churches may collectively affiliate with one another, they don’t exert the same control established denominations have on their congregations. Thus they are different from Protestant groups that have a national structure and a tradition of sorts. Most Non-Denominational churches focus on scripture alone and reject most forms of Christian Tradition. Their services tend to revolve around a lengthy sermon with bible quoting and perhaps a memorial service of the “Lord’s Supper” (Also called <span>the Eucharist and Holy </span>Communion). Pentecostal Churches are the largest movement within this tent of Christianity, focusing on the gifts of the Holy Spirit: prophesying, speaking in tongues, exorcisms, and healing. Non-Denominational Churches are the fastest growing group of Christians in the United States. Proposed theories have been a general disaffection with the authority of hierarchy, a return to the fundamentals and general conservatism which is in direct contrast to the liberalizing of many Protestant Denominations. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Simply stated, these Christian groups lack any regional or national organized structure. The terms “''Evangelical''” (which is not to be confused with Evangelist), “''Fundamental''”, “''Charismatic''” and, “''Pentecostal''” all refer to groups within this Non-Denominational classification. Non-Denominational Churches are derived from Protestant Churches and many individual churches vary in their styles of worship according to their influences. As a result, people have often grouped these churches within the realm of Protestantism, but this is misnomer. These Churches have a wide amount of autonomy and while individual churches may collectively affiliate with one another, they don’t exert the same control established denominations have on their congregations. Thus they are different from Protestant groups that have a national structure and a tradition of sorts. Most Non-Denominational churches focus on scripture alone and reject most forms of Christian Tradition. Their services tend to revolve around a lengthy sermon with bible quoting and perhaps a memorial service of the “Lord’s Supper” (Also called Communion). Pentecostal Churches are the largest movement within this tent of Christianity, focusing on the gifts of the Holy Spirit: prophesying, speaking in tongues, exorcisms, and healing. Non-Denominational Churches are the fastest growing group of Christians in the United States. Proposed theories have been a general disaffection with the authority of hierarchy, a return to the fundamentals and general conservatism which is in direct contrast to the liberalizing of many Protestant Denominations. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-07-03 16:07:19WilliamLewis(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 52: </td> <td> Line 52: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Simply stated, these Christian groups lack any regional or national organized structure. The terms “''Evangelical''” (which is not to be confused with Evangelist), “''Fundamental''”, “''Charismatic''” and, “''Pentecostal''” all refer to groups within this Non-Denominational classification. Non-Denominational Churches are derived from Protestant Churches and many individual <span>paris</span>hes vary in their styles of worship according to their influences. As a result, people have often grouped these churches within the realm of Protestantism, but this is misnomer. These Churches have a wide amount of autonomy and while individual churches may collectively affiliate with one another, they don’t exert the same control established denominations have on their congregations. Thus they are different from Protestant groups that have a national structure and a tradition of sorts. Most Non-Denominational churches focus on scripture alone and reject most forms of Christian Tradition. Their services tend to revolve around a lengthy sermon with bible quoting and perhaps a memorial service of the “Lord’s Supper” (Also called the Eucharist and Holy Communion). Pentecostal Churches are the largest movement within this tent of Christianity, focusing on the gifts of the Holy Spirit: prophesying, speaking in tongues, exorcisms, and healing. Non-Denominational Churches are the fastest growing group of Christians in the United States. Proposed theories have been a general disaffection with the authority of hierarchy, a return to the fundamentals and general conservatism which is in direct contrast to the liberalizing of many Protestant Denominations. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Simply stated, these Christian groups lack any regional or national organized structure. The terms “''Evangelical''” (which is not to be confused with Evangelist), “''Fundamental''”, “''Charismatic''” and, “''Pentecostal''” all refer to groups within this Non-Denominational classification. Non-Denominational Churches are derived from Protestant Churches and many individual <span>churc</span>hes vary in their styles of worship according to their influences. As a result, people have often grouped these churches within the realm of Protestantism, but this is misnomer. These Churches have a wide amount of autonomy and while individual churches may collectively affiliate with one another, they don’t exert the same control established denominations have on their congregations. Thus they are different from Protestant groups that have a national structure and a tradition of sorts. Most Non-Denominational churches focus on scripture alone and reject most forms of Christian Tradition. Their services tend to revolve around a lengthy sermon with bible quoting and perhaps a memorial service of the “Lord’s Supper” (Also called the Eucharist and Holy Communion). Pentecostal Churches are the largest movement within this tent of Christianity, focusing on the gifts of the Holy Spirit: prophesying, speaking in tongues, exorcisms, and healing. Non-Denominational Churches are the fastest growing group of Christians in the United States. Proposed theories have been a general disaffection with the authority of hierarchy, a return to the fundamentals and general conservatism which is in direct contrast to the liberalizing of many Protestant Denominations. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-07-03 16:06:29WilliamLewisparish is completely inappropriate, obviously written by a Roman Catholic. <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 52: </td> <td> Line 52: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Simply stated, these Christian groups lack any regional or national organized structure. The terms “''Evangelical''” (which is not to be confused with Evangelist), “''Fundamental''”, “''Charismatic''” and, “''Pentecostal''” all refer to groups within this Non-Denominational classification. Non-Denominational Churches are derived from Protestant Churches and many individual parishes vary in their styles of worship according to their influences. As a result, people have often grouped these churches within the realm of Protestantism, but this is misnomer. These Churches have a wide amount of autonomy and while <span>paris</span>hes may collectively affiliate with one another, they don’t exert the same control established denominations have on their congregations. Thus they are different from Protestant groups that have a national structure and a tradition of sorts. Most Non-Denominational churches focus on scripture alone and reject most forms of Christian Tradition. Their services tend to revolve around a lengthy sermon with bible quoting and perhaps a memorial service of the “Lord’s Supper” (Also called the Eucharist and Holy Communion). Pentecostal Churches are the largest movement within this tent of Christianity, focusing on the gifts of the Holy Spirit: prophesying, speaking in tongues, exorcisms, and healing. Non-Denominational Churches are the fastest growing group of Christians in the United States. Proposed theories have been a general disaffection with the authority of hierarchy, a return to the fundamentals and general conservatism which is in direct contrast to the liberalizing of many Protestant Denominations. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Simply stated, these Christian groups lack any regional or national organized structure. The terms “''Evangelical''” (which is not to be confused with Evangelist), “''Fundamental''”, “''Charismatic''” and, “''Pentecostal''” all refer to groups within this Non-Denominational classification. Non-Denominational Churches are derived from Protestant Churches and many individual parishes vary in their styles of worship according to their influences. As a result, people have often grouped these churches within the realm of Protestantism, but this is misnomer. These Churches have a wide amount of autonomy and while <span>individual churc</span>hes may collectively affiliate with one another, they don’t exert the same control established denominations have on their congregations. Thus they are different from Protestant groups that have a national structure and a tradition of sorts. Most Non-Denominational churches focus on scripture alone and reject most forms of Christian Tradition. Their services tend to revolve around a lengthy sermon with bible quoting and perhaps a memorial service of the “Lord’s Supper” (Also called the Eucharist and Holy Communion). Pentecostal Churches are the largest movement within this tent of Christianity, focusing on the gifts of the Holy Spirit: prophesying, speaking in tongues, exorcisms, and healing. Non-Denominational Churches are the fastest growing group of Christians in the United States. Proposed theories have been a general disaffection with the authority of hierarchy, a return to the fundamentals and general conservatism which is in direct contrast to the liberalizing of many Protestant Denominations. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-07-03 15:49:43Lightworker318 <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 52: </td> <td> Line 52: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Simply stated, these Christian groups lack any regional or national organized structure. The terms “''Evangelical''” (which is not to be confused with Evangelist), “''Fundamental''”, “''Charismatic''” and, “''Pentecostal''” all refer to groups within this Non-Denominational classification. Non-Denominational Churches are derived from Protestant Churches and many individual parishes vary in their styles of worship according to their influences. As a result, people have often grouped these churches within the realm of Protestantism, but this is misnomer. These Churches have a wide amount of autonomy and while parishes may collectively affiliate with one another, they don’t exert the same control established denominations have on their congregations. Thus they are different from Protestant groups that have a national structure and a tradition of sorts. Most Non-Denominational churches focus on scripture alone and reject most forms of Christian Tradition. Their services tend to revolve around a lengthy sermon with bible quoting and perhaps a memorial service of the “Lord’s Supper” (Also called Communion). Pentecostal Churches are the largest movement within this tent of Christianity, focusing on the gifts of the Holy Spirit: prophesying, speaking in tongues, exorcisms, and healing. Non-Denominational Churches are the fastest growing group of Christians in the United States. Proposed theories have been a general disaffection with the authority of hierarchy, a return to the fundamentals and general conservatism which is in direct contrast to the liberalizing of many Protestant Denominations. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Simply stated, these Christian groups lack any regional or national organized structure. The terms “''Evangelical''” (which is not to be confused with Evangelist), “''Fundamental''”, “''Charismatic''” and, “''Pentecostal''” all refer to groups within this Non-Denominational classification. Non-Denominational Churches are derived from Protestant Churches and many individual parishes vary in their styles of worship according to their influences. As a result, people have often grouped these churches within the realm of Protestantism, but this is misnomer. These Churches have a wide amount of autonomy and while parishes may collectively affiliate with one another, they don’t exert the same control established denominations have on their congregations. Thus they are different from Protestant groups that have a national structure and a tradition of sorts. Most Non-Denominational churches focus on scripture alone and reject most forms of Christian Tradition. Their services tend to revolve around a lengthy sermon with bible quoting and perhaps a memorial service of the “Lord’s Supper” (Also called <span>the Eucharist and Holy </span>Communion). Pentecostal Churches are the largest movement within this tent of Christianity, focusing on the gifts of the Holy Spirit: prophesying, speaking in tongues, exorcisms, and healing. Non-Denominational Churches are the fastest growing group of Christians in the United States. Proposed theories have been a general disaffection with the authority of hierarchy, a return to the fundamentals and general conservatism which is in direct contrast to the liberalizing of many Protestant Denominations. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-07-03 15:44:38Lightworker318 <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 52: </td> <td> Line 52: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Simply stated, these Christian groups lack any regional or national organized structure. The terms “''Evangelical''” (which is not to be confused with Evangelist), “''Fundamental''”, “''Charismatic''” and, “''Pentecostal''” all refer to groups within this Non-Denominational classification. Non-Denominational Churches are derived from Protestant Churches and many individual parishes vary in their styles of worship according to their influences. As a result, people have often grouped these churches within the realm of Protestantism, but this is misnomer. These Churches have a wide amount of autonomy and while parishes may collectively affiliate with one another, they don’t exert the same control established denominations have on their congregations. Thus they are different from Protestant groups that have a national structure and a tradition of sorts. Most Non-Denominational churches focus on scripture alone and reject most forms of Christian Tradition. Their services tend to revolve around a lengthy sermon with bible quoting and perhaps a memorial service of the “Lord’s Supper” (Also called <span>the Eucharist and Holy </span>Communion). Pentecostal Churches are the largest movement within this tent of Christianity, focusing on the gifts of the Holy Spirit: prophesying, speaking in tongues, exorcisms, and healing. Non-Denominational Churches are the fastest growing group of Christians in the United States. Proposed theories have been a general disaffection with the authority of hierarchy, a return to the fundamentals and general conservatism which is in direct contrast to the liberalizing of many Protestant Denominations. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Simply stated, these Christian groups lack any regional or national organized structure. The terms “''Evangelical''” (which is not to be confused with Evangelist), “''Fundamental''”, “''Charismatic''” and, “''Pentecostal''” all refer to groups within this Non-Denominational classification. Non-Denominational Churches are derived from Protestant Churches and many individual parishes vary in their styles of worship according to their influences. As a result, people have often grouped these churches within the realm of Protestantism, but this is misnomer. These Churches have a wide amount of autonomy and while parishes may collectively affiliate with one another, they don’t exert the same control established denominations have on their congregations. Thus they are different from Protestant groups that have a national structure and a tradition of sorts. Most Non-Denominational churches focus on scripture alone and reject most forms of Christian Tradition. Their services tend to revolve around a lengthy sermon with bible quoting and perhaps a memorial service of the “Lord’s Supper” (Also called Communion). Pentecostal Churches are the largest movement within this tent of Christianity, focusing on the gifts of the Holy Spirit: prophesying, speaking in tongues, exorcisms, and healing. Non-Denominational Churches are the fastest growing group of Christians in the United States. Proposed theories have been a general disaffection with the authority of hierarchy, a return to the fundamentals and general conservatism which is in direct contrast to the liberalizing of many Protestant Denominations. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-03-24 00:09:27Lightworker318 <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 11: </td> <td> Line 11: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Catholicism or Orthodoxy is a term used to describe a group of churches (denominations) that believe they are the universal Christian Church which is descended from the Apostles of Jesus Christ to this day. Though there are many churches that fall under this umbrella, the major groups include the Roman Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Churches and the Anglican Communion. These churches all share several distinguishing features that make them catholic. All have an organized hierarchy of clergy (Deaconate, Presbyterate, and Episcopate), affirm the belief in seven sacraments, believe in a group of venerated Christian persons called saints, believe in the Holy Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit), hold apostolic succession as key to their validity and continue to observe many traditions of the early Christian Church. The Roman Catholic Church believes their Bishop of Rome (Pope) to be the head of the universal church and the Vicar of Christ. They maintain they are the same church as the one created by the Apostles and have until recently been uninterested in efforts to understand other churches (ecumenism). The Orthodox Churches stem from the same church as the Roman Church but split over political and theological issues during the 11th century and maintain the Roman Church left them. Anglican Churches trace their roots to the Church of England which was born out of the Reformation. They believe the Roman Catholic Church deviated from the “True Church” and purged themselves of unbiblical practices created during the middle ages and returned to the liturgical style of the pre-medieval Catholic Church. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Catholicism or Orthodoxy is a term used to describe a group of churches (denominations) that believe they are the universal Christian Church which is descended from the Apostles of Jesus Christ to this day. Though there are many churches that fall under this umbrella, the major groups include the Roman Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Churches and the Anglican Communion. These churches all share several distinguishing features that make them catholic. All have an organized hierarchy of clergy (Deaconate, Presbyterate, and Episcopate), affirm the belief in seven sacraments, believe in a group of venerated Christian persons called saints, believe in the Holy Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit), hold apostolic succession as key to their validity and continue to observe many traditions of the early Christian Church. The Roman Catholic Church believes their Bishop of Rome (Pope<span>&nbsp;of Rome</span>) to be the head of the universal church and the Vicar of Christ. They maintain they are the same church as the one created by the Apostles and have until recently been uninterested in efforts to understand other churches (ecumenism). The Orthodox Churches stem from the same church as the Roman Church but split over political and theological issues during the 11th century and maintain the Roman Church left them. Anglican Churches trace their roots to the Church of England which was born out of the Reformation. They believe the Roman Catholic Church deviated from the “True Church” and purged themselves of unbiblical practices created during the middle ages and returned to the liturgical style of the pre-medieval Catholic Church. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-03-17 17:37:11Lightworker318 <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 15: </td> <td> Line 15: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> There are many Catholics that reside within ["Davis"] and who attend the ["UC Davis" university]. They are most recognizable on Ash Wednesday when they receive ashes upon their forehead as a remembrance of their physical mortality. Other distinguishing features include the making sign of the cross before prayer and or the ownership of a personal crucifix. While no Orthodox churches exist within Davis City limits, there are several parishes located in Sacramento. ["Roman Catholic" Roman Catholics] have ["St. James Catholic Church" Saint James' Catholic Church] and for students, the National Newman program is run out of the Newman Center which also conducts mass. Anglicans have ["The Episcopal Church of St. Martin" Saint Martin’s Episcopal Church] just behind the University Mall. There exist several student groups that cater to the different traditions including: The ["Orthodox Christian Fellowship"], ["Newman Center" Newman Catholic Center], and the now defunct ["Canterbury Club"] for Anglicans. The Anglican group merged with the Lutheran Fellowship a few years back, and now together cooperatively run a joint ministry. </td> <td> <span>+</span> There are many Catholics that reside within ["Davis"] and who attend the ["UC Davis" university]. They are most recognizable on Ash Wednesday when they receive ashes upon their forehead as a remembrance of their physical mortality. Other distinguishing features include the making sign of the cross before prayer and or the ownership of a personal crucifix. While <span>there are </span>no Orthodox churches exist within Davis City limits, there are several parishes located in Sacramento. ["Roman Catholic" Roman Catholics] have ["St. James Catholic Church" Saint James' Catholic Church] and for students, the National Newman program is run out of the Newman Center which also conducts mass. Anglicans have ["The Episcopal Church of St. Martin" Saint Martin’s Episcopal Church] just behind the University Mall. There exist several student groups that cater to the different traditions including: The ["Orthodox Christian Fellowship"], ["Newman Center" Newman Catholic Center], and the now defunct ["Canterbury Club"] for Anglicans. The Anglican group merged with the Lutheran Fellowship a few years back, and now together cooperatively run a joint ministry. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2010-03-17 17:23:50Lightworker318Update <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 8: </td> <td> Line 8: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> = Catholicism = </td> <td> <span>+</span> = Catholicism <span>and Orthodoxy </span>= </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2009-07-29 14:00:40RealComputersRevert to version 11 (page has info specific to davis). <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- deleted</span> </td> <td> <span>+ '''Christianity''' is a monotheistic ["religion"] based upon the belief that Jesus of Nazareth is the Christ, and is God. It is believed that he was born of a virgin, came to fulfill the Jewish prophecy of a messiah, was crucified and died, and was fully resurrected and ascended into heaven all for our redemption. Symbols attributed to Christianity are the Cross, Crucifix, fish and dove.<br> + <br> + Davis has a very large, active Christian population. There are dozens of different churches and groups representative of different traditions. Worldwide there are about 2.1 billion Christians with the Roman Catholic Church making up about ½ of that total. In the United States 79% of residents said they practice some form of Christianity or other. Catholics and Baptists make up the largest majority of Christians in the county. Christianity started as a sect within Judaism but gradually separated after the first century. Thus many Jewish texts are held sacred by Christians.<br> + <br> + Theologians usually break Christianity down into three or four sects or branches wherein all denominations fall under. The following will provide a brief overview of each sect, with examples and places of worship in Davis.<br> + [[Image(stainedglass.jpg, thumbnail, noborder, right, 300, "Many Churches and Cathedrals contain stained glass windows depicting Christian theology.")]]<br> + [[TableOfContents]]<br> + = Catholicism =<br> + <br> + == Overview ==<br> + Catholicism or Orthodoxy is a term used to describe a group of churches (denominations) that believe they are the universal Christian Church which is descended from the Apostles of Jesus Christ to this day. Though there are many churches that fall under this umbrella, the major groups include the Roman Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Churches and the Anglican Communion. These churches all share several distinguishing features that make them catholic. All have an organized hierarchy of clergy (Deaconate, Presbyterate, and Episcopate), affirm the belief in seven sacraments, believe in a group of venerated Christian persons called saints, believe in the Holy Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit), hold apostolic succession as key to their validity and continue to observe many traditions of the early Christian Church. The Roman Catholic Church believes their Bishop of Rome (Pope) to be the head of the universal church and the Vicar of Christ. They maintain they are the same church as the one created by the Apostles and have until recently been uninterested in efforts to understand other churches (ecumenism). The Orthodox Churches stem from the same church as the Roman Church but split over political and theological issues during the 11th century and maintain the Roman Church left them. Anglican Churches trace their roots to the Church of England which was born out of the Reformation. They believe the Roman Catholic Church deviated from the “True Church” and purged themselves of unbiblical practices created during the middle ages and returned to the liturgical style of the pre-medieval Catholic Church.<br> + <br> + == Davis Specific ==<br> + [[Image(mosaic.jpg, thumbnail, noborder, left, 240, "Mosaic artwork is often associated with Orthodoxy.")]]<br> + There are many Catholics that reside within ["Davis"] and who attend the ["UC Davis" university]. They are most recognizable on Ash Wednesday when they receive ashes upon their forehead as a remembrance of their physical mortality. Other distinguishing features include the making sign of the cross before prayer and or the ownership of a personal crucifix. While no Orthodox churches exist within Davis City limits, there are several parishes located in Sacramento. ["Roman Catholic" Roman Catholics] have ["St. James Catholic Church" Saint James' Catholic Church] and for students, the National Newman program is run out of the Newman Center which also conducts mass. Anglicans have ["The Episcopal Church of St. Martin" Saint Martin’s Episcopal Church] just behind the University Mall. There exist several student groups that cater to the different traditions including: The ["Orthodox Christian Fellowship"], ["Newman Center" Newman Catholic Center], and the now defunct ["Canterbury Club"] for Anglicans. The Anglican group merged with the Lutheran Fellowship a few years back, and now together cooperatively run a joint ministry.<br> + <br> + = Protestantism =<br> + <br> + == Overview ==<br> + [[Image(martinluther.jpg, thumbnail, noborder, right, 220, "A statue of Martin Luther.")]]<br> + Protestantism is a term used to describe any church that formed in protest of The Roman Catholic Church, but has also been applied to groups (perhaps incorrectly) that derive many beliefs or practices from traditional protestant denominations. Traditional Protestant churches include the Presbyterian, Methodist, Lutheran, Anabaptist, Reform and Baptist Churches. Anglicans are technically protestant, however; unlike other Protestant Churches they have kept a lot of Catholic doctrine and tradition. The main distinguishing feature of all Protestant groups is their belief in five fundamental points of truth or ''Solas'' (Dogmas). They are: ''1)'' The belief that Christ alone is mediator between God and Man, ''2)'' Authority rests upon scripture alone and not tradition of the Church, ''3)'' Faith alone and not good works will save a person’s soul, ''4)'' Grace is solely a gift from God and a person cannot influence their own grace ''5)'' Glory and praise are to God alone, thus rebuking the belief in Saints. Lutheran Churches are derived from the Church started by the reformer Martin Luther, a German monk disaffected with the Catholic Church. Reformed Churches derive their teachings from John Calvin who defied the Catholic Church and championed the notion of pre-destination. Presbyterian Churches derive their teachings from Calvin but uphold the belief (as do Lutherans) of a presbyter (priest) hierarchy. Methodists came about after the death of John Wesley, an Anglican priest who inspired many churches to adopt a more protestant style of life and who felt Anglicans and Catholics concentrated too much on tradition. Baptists, while never officially protesting the Roman Catholic Church, are usually considered a Protestant group as they came about during the time of the Methodist Church and hold beliefs similar to other Protestants.<br> + <br> + == Davis Specific ==<br> + Like Catholics, there are several places of worship for members of the various Protestant denominations. There are three Baptist Churches, three Lutheran Churches, ["The United Methodist Church of Davis"] and the ["Davis Community Church"], which is Presbyterian. There are three distinctly Protestant ["student organizations"] that meet on and off campus. ["Cal Aggie Christian Association"] which is a cooperative program between the Methodist, Presbyterian and Churches of Christ. The Lutherans are in a joint venture with the Episcopal Church in the ["Lutheran Episcopal Christian Fellowship" Lutheran-Episcopal Christian Fellowship].<br> + <br> + = Restorationism =<br> + <br> + == Overview ==<br> + [[Image(temple.jpg, thumbnail, noborder, left, 230, "A Mormon Temple with the Angel Moroni atop it.")]]<br> + Often referred to as the “protest against Protestants”, Restorationism is a movement that occurred in the 19th and 20th centuries around the time of the Second Great Awakening that attempted to transcend the denominations of Protestantism and restore Christianity to its perceived ideals. Though the churches in this classification may have little in common in regards to theology (in fact their beliefs are quite at odds with each other), they all arose out of the perceived notion that Christianity had been lost since the early years of Rome and their Churches were restoring the “True Church”.<br> + <br> + The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints was started by Joseph Smith, who claimed that Christ had appeared to him and told him that all currently existing churches were apostate and he was the chosen one to restore Christianity to it’s original form.<br> + <br> + The Seventh-Day Adventists were started by a group of Christians who believed they had received apocryphal confirmation from God and concentrated on preparing for the events proclaimed in the Book of Revelation.<br> + <br> + The Church of the Nazarene believes that Jesus’ teachings did not replace the Torah of Jewish tradition but exemplified it.<br> + <br> + Jehovah’s Witnesses hold that shortly after the last Apostle perished, the Church became apostate and that only through the literal interpretation of the bible can we understand God’s message. Jehovah Witnesses also believe in neutrality in politics, abstinence from military service and a rejection of Trinitarian Christianity.<br> + <br> + The Religious Society of Friends known as Quakers can be considered a restorationist group as well, although they are a product of the Anabaptist movement, which was a radical manifestation of the Reformation in the 16th and 17th centuries. Quakers believe in “feeling” God and reject a hierarchal church structure. They are a pacifist church.<br> + <br> + '''Note:'''<br> + Many Protestant and Catholic Christians have labeled these groups as heretics or cults. Whether they are or not, depends on your understanding of Christianity.<br> + <br> + == Davis Specific ==<br> + In Davis, sometimes residents and students can find Jehovah’s Witnesses walking house to house evangelizing, and Mormons (members of the Church of Latter-Day Saints) doing similar work. The ["Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints"] can be found on Elmwood Drive. They also run an institute of religion close to ["campus"]. The ["Seventh Day Adventists"] utilize the ["Pole Line Road Baptist Church"] on Saturdays for their worship services. The ["Davis Friends Meeting" Davis Friend’s Meeting] house can be found on L Street.<br> + <br> + = Non-Denominationalism =<br> + <br> + == Overview ==<br> + [[Image(bible.jpg, thumbnail, noborder, right, 250, "''Sola scriptura:'' The basis of Non-Denominational Churches.")]]<br> + Simply stated, these Christian groups lack any regional or national organized structure. The terms “''Evangelical''” (which is not to be confused with Evangelist), “''Fundamental''”, “''Charismatic''” and, “''Pentecostal''” all refer to groups within this Non-Denominational classification. Non-Denominational Churches are derived from Protestant Churches and many individual parishes vary in their styles of worship according to their influences. As a result, people have often grouped these churches within the realm of Protestantism, but this is misnomer. These Churches have a wide amount of autonomy and while parishes may collectively affiliate with one another, they don’t exert the same control established denominations have on their congregations. Thus they are different from Protestant groups that have a national structure and a tradition of sorts. Most Non-Denominational churches focus on scripture alone and reject most forms of Christian Tradition. Their services tend to revolve around a lengthy sermon with bible quoting and perhaps a memorial service of the “Lord’s Supper” (Also called the Eucharist and Holy Communion). Pentecostal Churches are the largest movement within this tent of Christianity, focusing on the gifts of the Holy Spirit: prophesying, speaking in tongues, exorcisms, and healing. Non-Denominational Churches are the fastest growing group of Christians in the United States. Proposed theories have been a general disaffection with the authority of hierarchy, a return to the fundamentals and general conservatism which is in direct contrast to the liberalizing of many Protestant Denominations.<br> + <br> + == Davis Specific ==<br> + There are many Non-Denominational Christians in Davis, perhaps more then the other groups put together. They are certainly the most vocal. Some examples of these churches include The ["Davis Christian Assembly"], ["Davis Korean Church"], ["Calvary Chapel Davis"], and ["Discovery Christian Church"].<br> + <br> + On Campus, this group of Christians tends to be very vocal about social injustices and staunch supporters of conservatism. Often you will find them with arms in the air, shuffling around and speaking out loud in worship services at various places on campus. Notable differences in prayer from Protestants and Catholics are their repetition of and sometimes unnecessary interjection of God’s name in random places during prayer. ["Campus Crusade for Christ"], ["Intervarsity Christian Fellowship"], ["Davis Christian Fellowship"] and ["Mustard Seed Ministry"] are some famous examples of Non-Denominational groups on camps. Intervarsity and Campus Crusade are by far the two largest groups. Partly the attraction to these groups is their wide acceptance of Christian backgrounds and disassociation with any one group of Christians making them widely inclusive.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2009-07-29 13:56:34BrentLaabsPage deleted (page is pointless, go to wikipedia) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- '''Christianity''' is a monotheistic ["religion"] based upon the belief that Jesus of Nazareth is the Christ, and is God. It is believed that he was born of a virgin, came to fulfill the Jewish prophecy of a messiah, was crucified and died, and was fully resurrected and ascended into heaven all for our redemption. Symbols attributed to Christianity are the Cross, Crucifix, fish and dove.<br> - <br> - Davis has a very large, active Christian population. There are dozens of different churches and groups representative of different traditions. Worldwide there are about 2.1 billion Christians with the Roman Catholic Church making up about ½ of that total. In the United States 79% of residents said they practice some form of Christianity or other. Catholics and Baptists make up the largest majority of Christians in the county. Christianity started as a sect within Judaism but gradually separated after the first century. Thus many Jewish texts are held sacred by Christians.<br> - <br> - Theologians usually break Christianity down into three or four sects or branches wherein all denominations fall under. The following will provide a brief overview of each sect, with examples and places of worship in Davis.<br> - [[Image(stainedglass.jpg, thumbnail, noborder, right, 300, "Many Churches and Cathedrals contain stained glass windows depicting Christian theology.")]]<br> - [[TableOfContents]]<br> - = Catholicism =<br> - <br> - == Overview ==<br> - Catholicism or Orthodoxy is a term used to describe a group of churches (denominations) that believe they are the universal Christian Church which is descended from the Apostles of Jesus Christ to this day. Though there are many churches that fall under this umbrella, the major groups include the Roman Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Churches and the Anglican Communion. These churches all share several distinguishing features that make them catholic. All have an organized hierarchy of clergy (Deaconate, Presbyterate, and Episcopate), affirm the belief in seven sacraments, believe in a group of venerated Christian persons called saints, believe in the Holy Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit), hold apostolic succession as key to their validity and continue to observe many traditions of the early Christian Church. The Roman Catholic Church believes their Bishop of Rome (Pope) to be the head of the universal church and the Vicar of Christ. They maintain they are the same church as the one created by the Apostles and have until recently been uninterested in efforts to understand other churches (ecumenism). The Orthodox Churches stem from the same church as the Roman Church but split over political and theological issues during the 11th century and maintain the Roman Church left them. Anglican Churches trace their roots to the Church of England which was born out of the Reformation. They believe the Roman Catholic Church deviated from the “True Church” and purged themselves of unbiblical practices created during the middle ages and returned to the liturgical style of the pre-medieval Catholic Church.<br> - <br> - == Davis Specific ==<br> - [[Image(mosaic.jpg, thumbnail, noborder, left, 240, "Mosaic artwork is often associated with Orthodoxy.")]]<br> - There are many Catholics that reside within ["Davis"] and who attend the ["UC Davis" university]. They are most recognizable on Ash Wednesday when they receive ashes upon their forehead as a remembrance of their physical mortality. Other distinguishing features include the making sign of the cross before prayer and or the ownership of a personal crucifix. While no Orthodox churches exist within Davis City limits, there are several parishes located in Sacramento. ["Roman Catholic" Roman Catholics] have ["St. James Catholic Church" Saint James' Catholic Church] and for students, the National Newman program is run out of the Newman Center which also conducts mass. Anglicans have ["The Episcopal Church of St. Martin" Saint Martin’s Episcopal Church] just behind the University Mall. There exist several student groups that cater to the different traditions including: The ["Orthodox Christian Fellowship"], ["Newman Center" Newman Catholic Center], and the now defunct ["Canterbury Club"] for Anglicans. The Anglican group merged with the Lutheran Fellowship a few years back, and now together cooperatively run a joint ministry.<br> - <br> - = Protestantism =<br> - <br> - == Overview ==<br> - [[Image(martinluther.jpg, thumbnail, noborder, right, 220, "A statue of Martin Luther.")]]<br> - Protestantism is a term used to describe any church that formed in protest of The Roman Catholic Church, but has also been applied to groups (perhaps incorrectly) that derive many beliefs or practices from traditional protestant denominations. Traditional Protestant churches include the Presbyterian, Methodist, Lutheran, Anabaptist, Reform and Baptist Churches. Anglicans are technically protestant, however; unlike other Protestant Churches they have kept a lot of Catholic doctrine and tradition. The main distinguishing feature of all Protestant groups is their belief in five fundamental points of truth or ''Solas'' (Dogmas). They are: ''1)'' The belief that Christ alone is mediator between God and Man, ''2)'' Authority rests upon scripture alone and not tradition of the Church, ''3)'' Faith alone and not good works will save a person’s soul, ''4)'' Grace is solely a gift from God and a person cannot influence their own grace ''5)'' Glory and praise are to God alone, thus rebuking the belief in Saints. Lutheran Churches are derived from the Church started by the reformer Martin Luther, a German monk disaffected with the Catholic Church. Reformed Churches derive their teachings from John Calvin who defied the Catholic Church and championed the notion of pre-destination. Presbyterian Churches derive their teachings from Calvin but uphold the belief (as do Lutherans) of a presbyter (priest) hierarchy. Methodists came about after the death of John Wesley, an Anglican priest who inspired many churches to adopt a more protestant style of life and who felt Anglicans and Catholics concentrated too much on tradition. Baptists, while never officially protesting the Roman Catholic Church, are usually considered a Protestant group as they came about during the time of the Methodist Church and hold beliefs similar to other Protestants.<br> - <br> - == Davis Specific ==<br> - Like Catholics, there are several places of worship for members of the various Protestant denominations. There are three Baptist Churches, three Lutheran Churches, ["The United Methodist Church of Davis"] and the ["Davis Community Church"], which is Presbyterian. There are three distinctly Protestant ["student organizations"] that meet on and off campus. ["Cal Aggie Christian Association"] which is a cooperative program between the Methodist, Presbyterian and Churches of Christ. The Lutherans are in a joint venture with the Episcopal Church in the ["Lutheran Episcopal Christian Fellowship" Lutheran-Episcopal Christian Fellowship].<br> - <br> - = Restorationism =<br> - <br> - == Overview ==<br> - [[Image(temple.jpg, thumbnail, noborder, left, 230, "A Mormon Temple with the Angel Moroni atop it.")]]<br> - Often referred to as the “protest against Protestants”, Restorationism is a movement that occurred in the 19th and 20th centuries around the time of the Second Great Awakening that attempted to transcend the denominations of Protestantism and restore Christianity to its perceived ideals. Though the churches in this classification may have little in common in regards to theology (in fact their beliefs are quite at odds with each other), they all arose out of the perceived notion that Christianity had been lost since the early years of Rome and their Churches were restoring the “True Church”.<br> - <br> - The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints was started by Joseph Smith, who claimed that Christ had appeared to him and told him that all currently existing churches were apostate and he was the chosen one to restore Christianity to it’s original form.<br> - <br> - The Seventh-Day Adventists were started by a group of Christians who believed they had received apocryphal confirmation from God and concentrated on preparing for the events proclaimed in the Book of Revelation.<br> - <br> - The Church of the Nazarene believes that Jesus’ teachings did not replace the Torah of Jewish tradition but exemplified it.<br> - <br> - Jehovah’s Witnesses hold that shortly after the last Apostle perished, the Church became apostate and that only through the literal interpretation of the bible can we understand God’s message. Jehovah Witnesses also believe in neutrality in politics, abstinence from military service and a rejection of Trinitarian Christianity.<br> - <br> - The Religious Society of Friends known as Quakers can be considered a restorationist group as well, although they are a product of the Anabaptist movement, which was a radical manifestation of the Reformation in the 16th and 17th centuries. Quakers believe in “feeling” God and reject a hierarchal church structure. They are a pacifist church.<br> - <br> - '''Note:'''<br> - Many Protestant and Catholic Christians have labeled these groups as heretics or cults. Whether they are or not, depends on your understanding of Christianity.<br> - <br> - == Davis Specific ==<br> - In Davis, sometimes residents and students can find Jehovah’s Witnesses walking house to house evangelizing, and Mormons (members of the Church of Latter-Day Saints) doing similar work. The ["Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints"] can be found on Elmwood Drive. They also run an institute of religion close to ["campus"]. The ["Seventh Day Adventists"] utilize the ["Pole Line Road Baptist Church"] on Saturdays for their worship services. The ["Davis Friends Meeting" Davis Friend’s Meeting] house can be found on L Street.<br> - <br> - = Non-Denominationalism =<br> - <br> - == Overview ==<br> - [[Image(bible.jpg, thumbnail, noborder, right, 250, "''Sola scriptura:'' The basis of Non-Denominational Churches.")]]<br> - Simply stated, these Christian groups lack any regional or national organized structure. The terms “''Evangelical''” (which is not to be confused with Evangelist), “''Fundamental''”, “''Charismatic''” and, “''Pentecostal''” all refer to groups within this Non-Denominational classification. Non-Denominational Churches are derived from Protestant Churches and many individual parishes vary in their styles of worship according to their influences. As a result, people have often grouped these churches within the realm of Protestantism, but this is misnomer. These Churches have a wide amount of autonomy and while parishes may collectively affiliate with one another, they don’t exert the same control established denominations have on their congregations. Thus they are different from Protestant groups that have a national structure and a tradition of sorts. Most Non-Denominational churches focus on scripture alone and reject most forms of Christian Tradition. Their services tend to revolve around a lengthy sermon with bible quoting and perhaps a memorial service of the “Lord’s Supper” (Also called the Eucharist and Holy Communion). Pentecostal Churches are the largest movement within this tent of Christianity, focusing on the gifts of the Holy Spirit: prophesying, speaking in tongues, exorcisms, and healing. Non-Denominational Churches are the fastest growing group of Christians in the United States. Proposed theories have been a general disaffection with the authority of hierarchy, a return to the fundamentals and general conservatism which is in direct contrast to the liberalizing of many Protestant Denominations.<br> - <br> - == Davis Specific ==<br> - There are many Non-Denominational Christians in Davis, perhaps more then the other groups put together. They are certainly the most vocal. Some examples of these churches include The ["Davis Christian Assembly"], ["Davis Korean Church"], ["Calvary Chapel Davis"], and ["Discovery Christian Church"].<br> - <br> - On Campus, this group of Christians tends to be very vocal about social injustices and staunch supporters of conservatism. Often you will find them with arms in the air, shuffling around and speaking out loud in worship services at various places on campus. Notable differences in prayer from Protestants and Catholics are their repetition of and sometimes unnecessary interjection of God’s name in random places during prayer. ["Campus Crusade for Christ"], ["Intervarsity Christian Fellowship"], ["Davis Christian Fellowship"] and ["Mustard Seed Ministry"] are some famous examples of Non-Denominational groups on camps. Intervarsity and Campus Crusade are by far the two largest groups. Partly the attraction to these groups is their wide acceptance of Christian backgrounds and disassociation with any one group of Christians making them widely inclusive.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ deleted</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2007-09-27 10:43:50MatthewPearsonClarified "Restorationism," changed formerly factual wording of LDS beliefs <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 30: </td> <td> Line 30: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Often referred to as the “protest against Protestants”, Restorationism is a movement that occurred in the 19th and 20th centuries that attempted to transcend the denominations of Protestantism and restore Christianity to <span>their</span> perceived ideals. Though the churches in this classification may have little in common in regards to theology, they all arose out of the perceived notion that Christianity had been lost since the early years of Rome and their Churches were restoring the “True Church”. The Church of Latter-Day Saints started by Joseph Smith, who <span>had</span> w<span>itnessed</span> Christ<span>&nbsp;and was told that all currently existin</span>g<span>&nbsp;churches were apostate and he was the chosen one to restore Christianity to it’s orig</span>inal form. The Seventh-Day Adventists were started by a group of Christians who believed they had received apocryphal confirmation from God and concentrated on preparing for the events proclaimed in the Book of Revelation. The Church of the Nazarene believes that Jesus’ teachings did not replace the Torah of Jewish tradition but exemplified it. Jehovah’s Witnesses hold that shortly after the last Apostle perished, the Church became apostate and that only through the literal interpretation of the bible can we understand God’s message. Jehovah Witnesses also believe in neutrality in politics, abstinence from military service and a rejection of Trinitarian Christianity. The Religious Society of Friends known as Quakers can be considered a restorationist group as well. Quakers believe in “feeling” God and reject a hierarchal church structure. They are a pacifist church. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Often referred to as the “protest against Protestants”, Restorationism is a movement that occurred in the 19th and 20th centuries <span>around the time of the Second Great Awakening </span>that attempted to transcend the denominations of Protestantism and restore Christianity to <span>its</span> perceived ideals. Though the churches in this classification may have little in common in regards to theology<span>&nbsp;(in fact their beliefs are quite at odds with each other)</span>, they all arose out of the perceived notion that Christianity had been lost since the early years of Rome and their Churches were restoring the “True Church”.<span><br> + <br> +</span> The Church<span>&nbsp;of Jesus Christ</span> of Latter-Day Saints <span>was </span>started by Joseph Smith, who <span>claimed that Christ had appeared to him and told him that all currently existing churches</span> w<span>ere apostate and he was the chosen one to restore</span> Christ<span>ianity to it’s ori</span>ginal form.<span><br> + <br> +</span> The Seventh-Day Adventists were started by a group of Christians who believed they had received apocryphal confirmation from God and concentrated on preparing for the events proclaimed in the Book of Revelation.<span><br> + <br> +</span> The Church of the Nazarene believes that Jesus’ teachings did not replace the Torah of Jewish tradition but exemplified it.<span><br> + <br> +</span> Jehovah’s Witnesses hold that shortly after the last Apostle perished, the Church became apostate and that only through the literal interpretation of the bible can we understand God’s message. Jehovah Witnesses also believe in neutrality in politics, abstinence from military service and a rejection of Trinitarian Christianity.<span><br> + <br> +</span> The Religious Society of Friends known as Quakers can be considered a restorationist group as well<span>, although they are a product of the Anabaptist movement, which was a radical manifestation of the Reformation in the 16th and 17th centuries</span>. Quakers believe in “feeling” God and reject a hierarchal church structure. They are a pacifist church. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2007-04-10 14:09:11WesHardakerreinsert "death" since it didn't make sense without it. <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 21: </td> <td> Line 21: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Protestantism is a term used to describe any church that formed in protest of The Roman Catholic Church, but has also been applied to groups (perhaps incorrectly) that derive many beliefs or practices from traditional protestant denominations. Traditional Protestant churches include the Presbyterian, Methodist, Lutheran, Anabaptist, Reform and Baptist Churches. Anglicans are technically protestant, however; unlike other Protestant Churches they have kept a lot of Catholic doctrine and tradition. The main distinguishing feature of all Protestant groups is their belief in five fundamental points of truth or ''Solas'' (Dogmas). They are: ''1)'' The belief that Christ alone is mediator between God and Man, ''2)'' Authority rests upon scripture alone and not tradition of the Church, ''3)'' Faith alone and not good works will save a person’s soul, ''4)'' Grace is solely a gift from God and a person cannot influence their own grace ''5)'' Glory and praise are to God alone, thus rebuking the belief in Saints. Lutheran Churches are derived from the Church started by the reformer Martin Luther, a German monk disaffected with the Catholic Church. Reformed Churches derive their teachings from John Calvin who defied the Catholic Church and championed the notion of pre-destination. Presbyterian Churches derive their teachings from Calvin but uphold the belief (as do Lutherans) of a presbyter (priest) hierarchy. Methodists came about after the <span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span> of John Wesley, an Anglican priest who inspired many churches to adopt a more protestant style of life and who felt Anglicans and Catholics concentrated too much on tradition. Baptists, while never officially protesting the Roman Catholic Church, are usually considered a Protestant group as they came about during the time of the Methodist Church and hold beliefs similar to other Protestants. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Protestantism is a term used to describe any church that formed in protest of The Roman Catholic Church, but has also been applied to groups (perhaps incorrectly) that derive many beliefs or practices from traditional protestant denominations. Traditional Protestant churches include the Presbyterian, Methodist, Lutheran, Anabaptist, Reform and Baptist Churches. Anglicans are technically protestant, however; unlike other Protestant Churches they have kept a lot of Catholic doctrine and tradition. The main distinguishing feature of all Protestant groups is their belief in five fundamental points of truth or ''Solas'' (Dogmas). They are: ''1)'' The belief that Christ alone is mediator between God and Man, ''2)'' Authority rests upon scripture alone and not tradition of the Church, ''3)'' Faith alone and not good works will save a person’s soul, ''4)'' Grace is solely a gift from God and a person cannot influence their own grace ''5)'' Glory and praise are to God alone, thus rebuking the belief in Saints. Lutheran Churches are derived from the Church started by the reformer Martin Luther, a German monk disaffected with the Catholic Church. Reformed Churches derive their teachings from John Calvin who defied the Catholic Church and championed the notion of pre-destination. Presbyterian Churches derive their teachings from Calvin but uphold the belief (as do Lutherans) of a presbyter (priest) hierarchy. Methodists came about after the <span>death</span> of John Wesley, an Anglican priest who inspired many churches to adopt a more protestant style of life and who felt Anglicans and Catholics concentrated too much on tradition. Baptists, while never officially protesting the Roman Catholic Church, are usually considered a Protestant group as they came about during the time of the Methodist Church and hold beliefs similar to other Protestants. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2007-04-10 13:59:06JohnLin <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 21: </td> <td> Line 21: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Protestantism is a term used to describe any church that formed in protest of The Roman Catholic Church, but has also been applied to groups (perhaps incorrectly) that derive many beliefs or practices from traditional protestant denominations. Traditional Protestant churches include the Presbyterian, Methodist, Lutheran, Anabaptist, Reform and Baptist Churches. Anglicans are technically protestant, however; unlike other Protestant Churches they have kept a lot of Catholic doctrine and tradition. The main distinguishing feature of all Protestant groups is their belief in five fundamental points of truth or ''Solas'' (Dogmas). They are: ''1)'' The belief that Christ alone is mediator between God and Man, ''2)'' Authority rests upon scripture alone and not tradition of the Church, ''3)'' Faith alone and not good works will save a person’s soul, ''4)'' Grace is solely a gift from God and a person cannot influence their own grace ''5)'' Glory and praise are to God alone, thus rebuking the belief in Saints. Lutheran Churches are derived from the Church started by the reformer Martin Luther, a German monk disaffected with the Catholic Church. Reformed Churches derive their teachings from John Calvin who defied the Catholic Church and championed the notion of pre-destination. Presbyterian Churches derive their teachings from Calvin but uphold the belief (as do Lutherans) of a presbyter (priest) hierarchy. Methodists came about after the <span>death</span> of John Wesley, an Anglican priest who inspired many churches to adopt a more protestant style of life and who felt Anglicans and Catholics concentrated too much on tradition. Baptists, while never officially protesting the Roman Catholic Church, are usually considered a Protestant group as they came about during the time of the Methodist Church and hold beliefs similar to other Protestants. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Protestantism is a term used to describe any church that formed in protest of The Roman Catholic Church, but has also been applied to groups (perhaps incorrectly) that derive many beliefs or practices from traditional protestant denominations. Traditional Protestant churches include the Presbyterian, Methodist, Lutheran, Anabaptist, Reform and Baptist Churches. Anglicans are technically protestant, however; unlike other Protestant Churches they have kept a lot of Catholic doctrine and tradition. The main distinguishing feature of all Protestant groups is their belief in five fundamental points of truth or ''Solas'' (Dogmas). They are: ''1)'' The belief that Christ alone is mediator between God and Man, ''2)'' Authority rests upon scripture alone and not tradition of the Church, ''3)'' Faith alone and not good works will save a person’s soul, ''4)'' Grace is solely a gift from God and a person cannot influence their own grace ''5)'' Glory and praise are to God alone, thus rebuking the belief in Saints. Lutheran Churches are derived from the Church started by the reformer Martin Luther, a German monk disaffected with the Catholic Church. Reformed Churches derive their teachings from John Calvin who defied the Catholic Church and championed the notion of pre-destination. Presbyterian Churches derive their teachings from Calvin but uphold the belief (as do Lutherans) of a presbyter (priest) hierarchy. Methodists came about after the <span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span> of John Wesley, an Anglican priest who inspired many churches to adopt a more protestant style of life and who felt Anglicans and Catholics concentrated too much on tradition. Baptists, while never officially protesting the Roman Catholic Church, are usually considered a Protestant group as they came about during the time of the Methodist Church and hold beliefs similar to other Protestants. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 24: </td> <td> Line 24: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Like Catholics, there are several places of worship for members of the various Protestant denominations. There are three Baptist Churches, three Lutheran Churches, ["The United Methodist Church of Davis"] and the ["Davis Community Church"], which is Presbyterian. There are three distinctly Protestant ["student organizations"] that meet on and off campus. ["Cal Aggie Christian Association"] which is a cooperative program between the Methodist, Presbyterian and Churches of Christ. The Lutherans are in a joint venture with the Episcopal Church in the ["Lutheran Episcopal Christian Fellowship" Lutheran-Episcopal Christian Fellowship].<span>&nbsp;The ["Asian Baptist Student Koinonia"] is a fellowship directed at Asian American students and Baptists; it is a nationwide organization.</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> Like Catholics, there are several places of worship for members of the various Protestant denominations. There are three Baptist Churches, three Lutheran Churches, ["The United Methodist Church of Davis"] and the ["Davis Community Church"], which is Presbyterian. There are three distinctly Protestant ["student organizations"] that meet on and off campus. ["Cal Aggie Christian Association"] which is a cooperative program between the Methodist, Presbyterian and Churches of Christ. The Lutherans are in a joint venture with the Episcopal Church in the ["Lutheran Episcopal Christian Fellowship" Lutheran-Episcopal Christian Fellowship]. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2007-03-12 23:56:18DavidGrundlerRemoved link to deleted page <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 11: </td> <td> Line 11: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Catholicism or Orthodoxy is a term used to describe a group of churches (denominations) that believe they are the universal Christian Church which is descended from the Apostles of Jesus Christ to this day. Though there are many churches that fall under this umbrella, the major groups include the Roman Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Churches and the Anglican Communion. These churches all share several distinguishing features that make them <span>["catholic"]</span>. All have an organized hierarchy of clergy (Deaconate, Presbyterate, and Episcopate), affirm the belief in seven sacraments, believe in a group of venerated Christian persons called saints, believe in the Holy Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit), hold apostolic succession as key to their validity and continue to observe many traditions of the early Christian Church. The Roman Catholic Church believes their Bishop of Rome (Pope) to be the head of the universal church and the Vicar of Christ. They maintain they are the same church as the one created by the Apostles and have until recently been uninterested in efforts to understand other churches (ecumenism). The Orthodox Churches stem from the same church as the Roman Church but split over political and theological issues during the 11th century and maintain the Roman Church left them. Anglican Churches trace their roots to the Church of England which was born out of the Reformation. They believe the Roman Catholic Church deviated from the “True Church” and purged themselves of unbiblical practices created during the middle ages and returned to the liturgical style of the pre-medieval Catholic Church. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Catholicism or Orthodoxy is a term used to describe a group of churches (denominations) that believe they are the universal Christian Church which is descended from the Apostles of Jesus Christ to this day. Though there are many churches that fall under this umbrella, the major groups include the Roman Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Churches and the Anglican Communion. These churches all share several distinguishing features that make them <span>catholic</span>. All have an organized hierarchy of clergy (Deaconate, Presbyterate, and Episcopate), affirm the belief in seven sacraments, believe in a group of venerated Christian persons called saints, believe in the Holy Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit), hold apostolic succession as key to their validity and continue to observe many traditions of the early Christian Church. The Roman Catholic Church believes their Bishop of Rome (Pope) to be the head of the universal church and the Vicar of Christ. They maintain they are the same church as the one created by the Apostles and have until recently been uninterested in efforts to understand other churches (ecumenism). The Orthodox Churches stem from the same church as the Roman Church but split over political and theological issues during the 11th century and maintain the Roman Church left them. Anglican Churches trace their roots to the Church of England which was born out of the Reformation. They believe the Roman Catholic Church deviated from the “True Church” and purged themselves of unbiblical practices created during the middle ages and returned to the liturgical style of the pre-medieval Catholic Church. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2006-07-23 01:51:16CarlosOverstreet <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 11: </td> <td> Line 11: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Catholicism or Orthodoxy is a term used to describe a group of churches (denominations) that believe they are the universal Christian Church which is descended from the Apostles of Jesus Christ to this day. Though there are many churches that fall under this umbrella, the major groups include the Roman Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Churches and the Anglican Communion. These churches all share several distinguishing features that make them <span>catholic</span>. All have an organized hierarchy of clergy (Deaconate, Presbyterate, and Episcopate), affirm the belief in seven sacraments, believe in a group of venerated Christian persons called saints, believe in the Holy Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit), hold apostolic succession as key to their validity and continue to observe many traditions of the early Christian Church. The Roman Catholic Church believes their Bishop of Rome (Pope) to be the head of the universal church and the Vicar of Christ. They maintain they are the same church as the one created by the Apostles and have until recently been uninterested in efforts to understand other churches (ecumenism). The Orthodox Churches stem from the same church as the Roman Church but split over political and theological issues during the 11th century and maintain the Roman Church left them. Anglican Churches trace their roots to the Church of England which was born out of the Reformation. They believe the Roman Catholic Church deviated from the “True Church” and purged themselves of unbiblical practices created during the middle ages and returned to the liturgical style of the pre-medieval Catholic Church. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Catholicism or Orthodoxy is a term used to describe a group of churches (denominations) that believe they are the universal Christian Church which is descended from the Apostles of Jesus Christ to this day. Though there are many churches that fall under this umbrella, the major groups include the Roman Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Churches and the Anglican Communion. These churches all share several distinguishing features that make them <span>["catholic"]</span>. All have an organized hierarchy of clergy (Deaconate, Presbyterate, and Episcopate), affirm the belief in seven sacraments, believe in a group of venerated Christian persons called saints, believe in the Holy Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit), hold apostolic succession as key to their validity and continue to observe many traditions of the early Christian Church. The Roman Catholic Church believes their Bishop of Rome (Pope) to be the head of the universal church and the Vicar of Christ. They maintain they are the same church as the one created by the Apostles and have until recently been uninterested in efforts to understand other churches (ecumenism). The Orthodox Churches stem from the same church as the Roman Church but split over political and theological issues during the 11th century and maintain the Roman Church left them. Anglican Churches trace their roots to the Church of England which was born out of the Reformation. They believe the Roman Catholic Church deviated from the “True Church” and purged themselves of unbiblical practices created during the middle ages and returned to the liturgical style of the pre-medieval Catholic Church. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 15: </td> <td> Line 15: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> There are many Catholics that reside within ["Davis"] and who attend the ["UC Davis" university]. They are most recognizable on Ash Wednesday when they receive ashes upon their forehead as a remembrance of their physical mortality. Other distinguishing features include the making sign of the cross before prayer and or the ownership of a personal crucifix. While no Orthodox churches exist within Davis City limits, there are several parishes located in Sacramento. Roman Catholic<span>s</span> have ["St. James Catholic Church" Saint James' Catholic Church] and for students, the National Newman program is run out of the Newman Center which also conducts mass. Anglicans have ["The Episcopal Church of St. Martin" Saint Martin’s Episcopal Church] just behind the University Mall. There exist several student groups that cater to the different traditions including: The ["Orthodox Christian Fellowship"], ["Newman Center" Newman Catholic Center], and the now defunct ["Canterbury Club"] for Anglicans. The Anglican group merged with the Lutheran Fellowship a few years back, and now together cooperatively run a joint ministry. </td> <td> <span>+</span> There are many Catholics that reside within ["Davis"] and who attend the ["UC Davis" university]. They are most recognizable on Ash Wednesday when they receive ashes upon their forehead as a remembrance of their physical mortality. Other distinguishing features include the making sign of the cross before prayer and or the ownership of a personal crucifix. While no Orthodox churches exist within Davis City limits, there are several parishes located in Sacramento. <span>["</span>Roman Catholic<span>" Roman Catholics]</span> have ["St. James Catholic Church" Saint James' Catholic Church] and for students, the National Newman program is run out of the Newman Center which also conducts mass. Anglicans have ["The Episcopal Church of St. Martin" Saint Martin’s Episcopal Church] just behind the University Mall. There exist several student groups that cater to the different traditions including: The ["Orthodox Christian Fellowship"], ["Newman Center" Newman Catholic Center], and the now defunct ["Canterbury Club"] for Anglicans. The Anglican group merged with the Lutheran Fellowship a few years back, and now together cooperatively run a joint ministry. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2006-07-23 01:19:09CarlosOverstreet <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 6: </td> <td> Line 6: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> [[Image(stainedglass.jpg, thumbnail, noborder, right, 300, "Many Churches and Cathedrals contain stained glass i<span>mage</span>s depicting Christian theology.")]] </td> <td> <span>+</span> [[Image(stainedglass.jpg, thumbnail, noborder, right, 300, "Many Churches and Cathedrals contain stained glass <span>w</span>i<span>ndow</span>s depicting Christian theology.")]] </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2006-07-23 01:18:39CarlosOverstreet <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 6: </td> <td> Line 6: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> [[Image(stainedglass.jpg, thumbnail, noborder, right, 300, "Many Churches and Cathedrals contain stain glass images depicting Christian theology.")]] </td> <td> <span>+</span> [[Image(stainedglass.jpg, thumbnail, noborder, right, 300, "Many Churches and Cathedrals contain stain<span>ed</span> glass images depicting Christian theology.")]] </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2006-07-23 01:17:49CarlosOverstreetClosed down redirection, added lots of information, pictures and links to places <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- #redirect Spiritual Organizations</span> </td> <td> <span>+ '''Christianity''' is a monotheistic ["religion"] based upon the belief that Jesus of Nazareth is the Christ, and is God. It is believed that he was born of a virgin, came to fulfill the Jewish prophecy of a messiah, was crucified and died, and was fully resurrected and ascended into heaven all for our redemption. Symbols attributed to Christianity are the Cross, Crucifix, fish and dove.<br> + <br> + Davis has a very large, active Christian population. There are dozens of different churches and groups representative of different traditions. Worldwide there are about 2.1 billion Christians with the Roman Catholic Church making up about ½ of that total. In the United States 79% of residents said they practice some form of Christianity or other. Catholics and Baptists make up the largest majority of Christians in the county. Christianity started as a sect within Judaism but gradually separated after the first century. Thus many Jewish texts are held sacred by Christians.<br> + <br> + Theologians usually break Christianity down into three or four sects or branches wherein all denominations fall under. The following will provide a brief overview of each sect, with examples and places of worship in Davis.<br> + [[Image(stainedglass.jpg, thumbnail, noborder, right, 300, "Many Churches and Cathedrals contain stain glass images depicting Christian theology.")]]<br> + [[TableOfContents]]<br> + = Catholicism =<br> + <br> + == Overview ==<br> + Catholicism or Orthodoxy is a term used to describe a group of churches (denominations) that believe they are the universal Christian Church which is descended from the Apostles of Jesus Christ to this day. Though there are many churches that fall under this umbrella, the major groups include the Roman Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Churches and the Anglican Communion. These churches all share several distinguishing features that make them catholic. All have an organized hierarchy of clergy (Deaconate, Presbyterate, and Episcopate), affirm the belief in seven sacraments, believe in a group of venerated Christian persons called saints, believe in the Holy Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit), hold apostolic succession as key to their validity and continue to observe many traditions of the early Christian Church. The Roman Catholic Church believes their Bishop of Rome (Pope) to be the head of the universal church and the Vicar of Christ. They maintain they are the same church as the one created by the Apostles and have until recently been uninterested in efforts to understand other churches (ecumenism). The Orthodox Churches stem from the same church as the Roman Church but split over political and theological issues during the 11th century and maintain the Roman Church left them. Anglican Churches trace their roots to the Church of England which was born out of the Reformation. They believe the Roman Catholic Church deviated from the “True Church” and purged themselves of unbiblical practices created during the middle ages and returned to the liturgical style of the pre-medieval Catholic Church.<br> + <br> + == Davis Specific ==<br> + [[Image(mosaic.jpg, thumbnail, noborder, left, 240, "Mosaic artwork is often associated with Orthodoxy.")]]<br> + There are many Catholics that reside within ["Davis"] and who attend the ["UC Davis" university]. They are most recognizable on Ash Wednesday when they receive ashes upon their forehead as a remembrance of their physical mortality. Other distinguishing features include the making sign of the cross before prayer and or the ownership of a personal crucifix. While no Orthodox churches exist within Davis City limits, there are several parishes located in Sacramento. Roman Catholics have ["St. James Catholic Church" Saint James' Catholic Church] and for students, the National Newman program is run out of the Newman Center which also conducts mass. Anglicans have ["The Episcopal Church of St. Martin" Saint Martin’s Episcopal Church] just behind the University Mall. There exist several student groups that cater to the different traditions including: The ["Orthodox Christian Fellowship"], ["Newman Center" Newman Catholic Center], and the now defunct ["Canterbury Club"] for Anglicans. The Anglican group merged with the Lutheran Fellowship a few years back, and now together cooperatively run a joint ministry.<br> + <br> + = Protestantism =<br> + <br> + == Overview ==<br> + [[Image(martinluther.jpg, thumbnail, noborder, right, 220, "A statue of Martin Luther.")]]<br> + Protestantism is a term used to describe any church that formed in protest of The Roman Catholic Church, but has also been applied to groups (perhaps incorrectly) that derive many beliefs or practices from traditional protestant denominations. Traditional Protestant churches include the Presbyterian, Methodist, Lutheran, Anabaptist, Reform and Baptist Churches. Anglicans are technically protestant, however; unlike other Protestant Churches they have kept a lot of Catholic doctrine and tradition. The main distinguishing feature of all Protestant groups is their belief in five fundamental points of truth or ''Solas'' (Dogmas). They are: ''1)'' The belief that Christ alone is mediator between God and Man, ''2)'' Authority rests upon scripture alone and not tradition of the Church, ''3)'' Faith alone and not good works will save a person’s soul, ''4)'' Grace is solely a gift from God and a person cannot influence their own grace ''5)'' Glory and praise are to God alone, thus rebuking the belief in Saints. Lutheran Churches are derived from the Church started by the reformer Martin Luther, a German monk disaffected with the Catholic Church. Reformed Churches derive their teachings from John Calvin who defied the Catholic Church and championed the notion of pre-destination. Presbyterian Churches derive their teachings from Calvin but uphold the belief (as do Lutherans) of a presbyter (priest) hierarchy. Methodists came about after the death of John Wesley, an Anglican priest who inspired many churches to adopt a more protestant style of life and who felt Anglicans and Catholics concentrated too much on tradition. Baptists, while never officially protesting the Roman Catholic Church, are usually considered a Protestant group as they came about during the time of the Methodist Church and hold beliefs similar to other Protestants.<br> + <br> + == Davis Specific ==<br> + Like Catholics, there are several places of worship for members of the various Protestant denominations. There are three Baptist Churches, three Lutheran Churches, ["The United Methodist Church of Davis"] and the ["Davis Community Church"], which is Presbyterian. There are three distinctly Protestant ["student organizations"] that meet on and off campus. ["Cal Aggie Christian Association"] which is a cooperative program between the Methodist, Presbyterian and Churches of Christ. The Lutherans are in a joint venture with the Episcopal Church in the ["Lutheran Episcopal Christian Fellowship" Lutheran-Episcopal Christian Fellowship]. The ["Asian Baptist Student Koinonia"] is a fellowship directed at Asian American students and Baptists; it is a nationwide organization.<br> + <br> + = Restorationism =<br> + <br> + == Overview ==<br> + [[Image(temple.jpg, thumbnail, noborder, left, 230, "A Mormon Temple with the Angel Moroni atop it.")]]<br> + Often referred to as the “protest against Protestants”, Restorationism is a movement that occurred in the 19th and 20th centuries that attempted to transcend the denominations of Protestantism and restore Christianity to their perceived ideals. Though the churches in this classification may have little in common in regards to theology, they all arose out of the perceived notion that Christianity had been lost since the early years of Rome and their Churches were restoring the “True Church”. The Church of Latter-Day Saints started by Joseph Smith, who had witnessed Christ and was told that all currently existing churches were apostate and he was the chosen one to restore Christianity to it’s original form. The Seventh-Day Adventists were started by a group of Christians who believed they had received apocryphal confirmation from God and concentrated on preparing for the events proclaimed in the Book of Revelation. The Church of the Nazarene believes that Jesus’ teachings did not replace the Torah of Jewish tradition but exemplified it. Jehovah’s Witnesses hold that shortly after the last Apostle perished, the Church became apostate and that only through the literal interpretation of the bible can we understand God’s message. Jehovah Witnesses also believe in neutrality in politics, abstinence from military service and a rejection of Trinitarian Christianity. The Religious Society of Friends known as Quakers can be considered a restorationist group as well. Quakers believe in “feeling” God and reject a hierarchal church structure. They are a pacifist church.<br> + <br> + '''Note:'''<br> + Many Protestant and Catholic Christians have labeled these groups as heretics or cults. Whether they are or not, depends on your understanding of Christianity.<br> + <br> + == Davis Specific ==<br> + In Davis, sometimes residents and students can find Jehovah’s Witnesses walking house to house evangelizing, and Mormons (members of the Church of Latter-Day Saints) doing similar work. The ["Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints"] can be found on Elmwood Drive. They also run an institute of religion close to ["campus"]. The ["Seventh Day Adventists"] utilize the ["Pole Line Road Baptist Church"] on Saturdays for their worship services. The ["Davis Friends Meeting" Davis Friend’s Meeting] house can be found on L Street.<br> + <br> + = Non-Denominationalism =<br> + <br> + == Overview ==<br> + [[Image(bible.jpg, thumbnail, noborder, right, 250, "''Sola scriptura:'' The basis of Non-Denominational Churches.")]]<br> + Simply stated, these Christian groups lack any regional or national organized structure. The terms “''Evangelical''” (which is not to be confused with Evangelist), “''Fundamental''”, “''Charismatic''” and, “''Pentecostal''” all refer to groups within this Non-Denominational classification. Non-Denominational Churches are derived from Protestant Churches and many individual parishes vary in their styles of worship according to their influences. As a result, people have often grouped these churches within the realm of Protestantism, but this is misnomer. These Churches have a wide amount of autonomy and while parishes may collectively affiliate with one another, they don’t exert the same control established denominations have on their congregations. Thus they are different from Protestant groups that have a national structure and a tradition of sorts. Most Non-Denominational churches focus on scripture alone and reject most forms of Christian Tradition. Their services tend to revolve around a lengthy sermon with bible quoting and perhaps a memorial service of the “Lord’s Supper” (Also called the Eucharist and Holy Communion). Pentecostal Churches are the largest movement within this tent of Christianity, focusing on the gifts of the Holy Spirit: prophesying, speaking in tongues, exorcisms, and healing. Non-Denominational Churches are the fastest growing group of Christians in the United States. Proposed theories have been a general disaffection with the authority of hierarchy, a return to the fundamentals and general conservatism which is in direct contrast to the liberalizing of many Protestant Denominations.<br> + <br> + == Davis Specific ==<br> + There are many Non-Denominational Christians in Davis, perhaps more then the other groups put together. They are certainly the most vocal. Some examples of these churches include The ["Davis Christian Assembly"], ["Davis Korean Church"], ["Calvary Chapel Davis"], and ["Discovery Christian Church"].<br> + <br> + On Campus, this group of Christians tends to be very vocal about social injustices and staunch supporters of conservatism. Often you will find them with arms in the air, shuffling around and speaking out loud in worship services at various places on campus. Notable differences in prayer from Protestants and Catholics are their repetition of and sometimes unnecessary interjection of God’s name in random places during prayer. ["Campus Crusade for Christ"], ["Intervarsity Christian Fellowship"], ["Davis Christian Fellowship"] and ["Mustard Seed Ministry"] are some famous examples of Non-Denominational groups on camps. Intervarsity and Campus Crusade are by far the two largest groups. Partly the attraction to these groups is their wide acceptance of Christian backgrounds and disassociation with any one group of Christians making them widely inclusive.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2006-07-23 01:01:35CarlosOverstreetUpload of image <a href="http://daviswiki.org/Christianity?action=Files&do=view&target=bible.jpg">bible.jpg</a>.Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2006-07-23 00:58:25CarlosOverstreetUpload of image <a href="http://daviswiki.org/Christianity?action=Files&do=view&target=temple.jpg">temple.jpg</a>.Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2006-07-23 00:55:27CarlosOverstreetUpload of image <a href="http://daviswiki.org/Christianity?action=Files&do=view&target=martinluther.jpg">martinluther.jpg</a>.Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2006-07-23 00:51:31CarlosOverstreetUpload of image <a href="http://daviswiki.org/Christianity?action=Files&do=view&target=mosaic.jpg">mosaic.jpg</a>.Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2006-07-23 00:49:13CarlosOverstreetUpload of image <a href="http://daviswiki.org/Christianity?action=Files&do=view&target=stainedglass.jpg">stainedglass.jpg</a>.Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2005-11-08 16:02:56JabberWokkyHe created it, it *does* makes sense. (Redir: Spiritual Orgs) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- ||&lt;bgcolor='#E0E0FF'&gt;'''Location'''||<br> - ||At UC Davis Social Science 1100 Building||<br> - ||&lt;bgcolor='#E0E0FF'&gt;'''Hours'''||<br> - ||9-10:15pm Every Wednesday||<br> - ||&lt;bgcolor='#E0E0FF'&gt;'''Phone'''||<br> - ||(707)455-7790||<br> - ||&lt;bgcolor='#E0E0FF'&gt;'''Website'''||<br> - ||[http://www.tfhucd.com]||<br> - ||&lt;bgcolor='#E0E0FF'&gt;'''Established'''||<br> - ||October 2005||<br> - <br> - <br> - tfh @ ucd is the campus ministry of the father's house church in vacaville, ca. Our desire is to see <br> - "a community of students living in the presence and purposes of God". We would love for you to come hang out with us for our weekly services on wednesday night in the 1100 social sciences building at 9pm. thank you for taking the time to check out our site... <br> - <br> - attachment:Directions.jpg<br> - <br> - [[Comments]]</span> </td> <td> <span>+ #redirect Spiritual Organizations</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2005-11-08 14:36:24AaronVorbau <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 12: </td> <td> Line 12: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 15: </td> <td> Line 16: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ attachment:Directions.jpg<br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Christianityhttp://daviswiki.org/Christianity2005-11-08 14:24:40AaronVorbau <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Christianity<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ||&lt;bgcolor='#E0E0FF'&gt;'''Location'''||<br> + ||At UC Davis Social Science 1100 Building||<br> + ||&lt;bgcolor='#E0E0FF'&gt;'''Hours'''||<br> + ||9-10:15pm Every Wednesday||<br> + ||&lt;bgcolor='#E0E0FF'&gt;'''Phone'''||<br> + ||(707)455-7790||<br> + ||&lt;bgcolor='#E0E0FF'&gt;'''Website'''||<br> + ||[http://www.tfhucd.com]||<br> + ||&lt;bgcolor='#E0E0FF'&gt;'''Established'''||<br> + ||October 2005||<br> + <br> + tfh @ ucd is the campus ministry of the father's house church in vacaville, ca. Our desire is to see <br> + "a community of students living in the presence and purposes of God". We would love for you to come hang out with us for our weekly services on wednesday night in the 1100 social sciences building at 9pm. thank you for taking the time to check out our site... <br> + <br> + [[Comments]]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div>