Recent Changes for "Computer Science" - Davis Wikihttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_ScienceRecent Changes of the page "Computer Science" on Davis Wiki.en-us Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2014-07-18 08:54:03JohnMcHugh <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 40: </td> <td> Line 40: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * ''At first I thought this class was interesting but after taking ECS 30 I realized ECS 10 was a huge waste of my time. ECS 30 covers all the same basics of programming that ECS 10 does except in much more detail. You actually get to apply what you learn to algorithms and whatnot. Don't bother with this class. Even if you are 100% new to programming take ECS 30 instead.'' - John McHugh<br> + </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 43: </td> <td> Line 45: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + * ''Easy class if you are good at abstract mathematical concepts. Not you typical lower division math class. Nelson Max is an awesome professor in this class and you will learn a lot! I highly recommend you actually pay attention in this class since the concepts of set and graph theory are important if you are taking ECS 120/122AB.'' - John McHugh</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 62: </td> <td> Line 66: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * ''Took this class with Bernd Hamann. Thank god I had experience programming going into ECS 30. Hamann is the worst professor I have ever had. He taught ECS 30 using obsolete graphics libraries from 1995 written by some guy who wanted to make the C programming language look as much like Java as possible. Literally a joke of a class. Not only can you not understand this guy but the homework is almost entirely graphics. I'd rather pay $4.5k and graduate a quarter late than ever have to take a class with him again. I got an A+ but that is simply because I knew how to program in C coming into this class. '''BEWARE!''' Do not take this guy if you have any intention of going on to ECS 40.'' - John McHugh<br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2011-04-05 00:43:12EdmundYan(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 95: </td> <td> Line 95: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ''ECS 122B - Algorithm Design and Analysis'': This class is the sequel to 122A. According to the 2008-2010 course catalog, this class covers "Theory and practice of hard problems, and problems with complex algorithm solutions. NP-completeness, approximation algorithms, randomized algorithms, dynamic programming and branch and bound. Students do theoretical analysis, implementation and practical evaluations. Examples from parallel, string, graph, and geometric algorithms."<span>&nbsp;ECS 122B is rarely taught, if ever.</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> ''ECS 122B - Algorithm Design and Analysis'': This class is the sequel to 122A. According to the 2008-2010 course catalog, this class covers "Theory and practice of hard problems, and problems with complex algorithm solutions. NP-completeness, approximation algorithms, randomized algorithms, dynamic programming and branch and bound. Students do theoretical analysis, implementation and practical evaluations. Examples from parallel, string, graph, and geometric algorithms." </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2011-04-05 00:42:35EdmundYan(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 97: </td> <td> Line 97: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * ''Was taught by Prof. Martel. Used the same book as 122A and was pretty much a continuation course. Depending on 122A prof, repeat of P/NP and approximation algorithms as.'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * ''Was taught by Prof. Martel. Used the same book as 122A and was pretty much a continuation course. Depending on 122A prof, repeat of P/NP and approximation algorithms as.''<span>&nbsp;["Users/EdmundYan"]''</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2011-04-05 00:41:52EdmundYan(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 97: </td> <td> Line 97: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * ''Was taught by Prof. Martel. Used the same book as 122A and was pretty much a continuation course. Depending on 122A prof, repeat of P/NP and approximation algorithms as.''<br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2011-03-21 10:11:53JabberWokkyOops. I accidentally normalized a CS prof. (This is hilarious to a few people) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 11: </td> <td> Line 11: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * ["Norman Matloff" Dr. Norma<span>l</span> Matloff] </td> <td> <span>+</span> * ["Norman Matloff" Dr. Norma<span>n</span> Matloff] </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2011-03-21 10:11:01JabberWokky <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 6: </td> <td> Line 6: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + == Current Faculty ==<br> + <br> + ''An incomplete list -- add the members you know of''<br> + <br> + * ["Norman Matloff" Dr. Normal Matloff]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2011-02-11 20:37:39JasonAller <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 150: </td> <td> Line 150: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * ''Had professor Farrens too. He is a good lecturer, but was not very on top of things in terms of class organization. We didn't have a web page set up nor had any homeworks until about 4th week into the quarter, in which he announced that we would have weekly quizzes and told us we would need to design 3 CPUs in the remaining weeks. Work load was quite heavy. Quizzes were open book/notes, midterm and final allowed 1 and 2 sheets of notes (respectively). Class is not to be taken lightly.--["User/MysticHLE"]'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * ''Had professor Farrens too. He is a good lecturer, but was not very on top of things in terms of class organization. We didn't have a web page set up nor had any homeworks until about 4th week into the quarter, in which he announced that we would have weekly quizzes and told us we would need to design 3 CPUs in the remaining weeks. Work load was quite heavy. Quizzes were open book/notes, midterm and final allowed 1 and 2 sheets of notes (respectively). Class is not to be taken lightly.--["User<span>s</span>/MysticHLE"]'' </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2010-12-29 11:23:00sfelixwu <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 206: </td> <td> Line 206: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * "For ecs251 of spring 2011, we will be studying both traditional OS topics (balanced between single OS kernel and distributed system) and some more advanced topics such as online social network (e.g., Diaspora, DavisSocialLinks, Facebook API) and social informatics for OS kernel (e.g., what is the social informatics view of a piece of FreeBSD virtual memory, which might contain, directly or indirectly, network packets/TCP sessions during a period of time). The students should know C really well and ready to self-learn PHP if you don't know it already -- ["Users/sfelixwu"]" </td> <td> <span>+ </span> * "For ecs251 of spring 2011, we will be studying both traditional OS topics (balanced between single OS kernel and distributed system) and some more advanced topics such as online social network (e.g., Diaspora, DavisSocialLinks, Facebook API) and social informatics for OS kernel (e.g., what is the social informatics view of a piece of FreeBSD virtual memory, which might contain, directly or indirectly, network packets/TCP sessions during a period of time). The students should know C really well and ready to self-learn PHP if you don't know it already -- ["Users/sfelixwu"]" </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2010-12-29 11:21:28sfelixwu <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 206: </td> <td> Line 206: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * "For ecs251 of spring 2011, we will be studying both traditional OS topics (balanced between single OS kernel and distributed system) and some more advanced topics such as online social network (e.g., Diaspora, DavisSocialLinks, Facebook API) and social informatics for OS kernel (e.g., what is the social informatics view of a piece of FreeBSD virtual memory, which might contain, directly or indirectly, network packets/TCP sessions during a period of time). The students should know C really well and ready to self-learn PHP if you don't know it already -- ["Users/sfelixwu"]"<br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2010-12-29 11:13:15sfelixwu <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p>No differences found!</div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2010-12-29 11:00:21sfelixwu <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 125: </td> <td> Line 125: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * "We have been doing FreeBSD, V-node (stackable file system, snoopFS) and its integration with Bit Torrent for the past few years. I am planning to add Facebook application for the fall quarter of 2011. I.e., how to hook a Facebook application/service with OS kernel. And, Sophie (which was my last TA for Minix) and many other great TAs have contributed tremendously. -- ["Users/sfelixwu"]"<br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2010-11-12 21:02:00StephenHudson(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 61: </td> <td> Line 61: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * ''Somewhat time-consuming, occasionally challenging but mostly just getting used to producing a full-size program that actually works. With Ken Joy, he gives a big scary lecture at the beginning of the quarter that makes it seem like nobody will pass the class without working in large groups to conceptualize the problems, but it turns out not being to difficult. Expect to spend 5-10 hours per week writing and debugging. Although it's probably a good idea to go to lectures, you can get by without attending if you know how to use Google and Wikipedia. --["Users/StephenHudson"]'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * ''Somewhat time-consuming, occasionally challenging but mostly just getting used to producing a full-size program that actually works. With Ken Joy, he gives a big scary lecture at the beginning of the quarter that makes it seem like nobody will pass the class without working in large groups to conceptualize the problems, but it turns out not being t<span>o</span>o difficult. Expect to spend 5-10 hours per week writing and debugging. Although it's probably a good idea to go to lectures, you can get by without attending if you know how to use Google and Wikipedia. --["Users/StephenHudson"]'' </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2010-11-12 21:00:28StephenHudson(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 24: </td> <td> Line 24: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * ''I had the same experience -- I was planning on an EE<span>C</span> major until ENG 17. Eventually I ended up in CS. -- ["Users/StephenHudson"]'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * ''I had the same experience -- I was planning on an EE major until ENG 17. Eventually I ended up in CS. -- ["Users/StephenHudson"]'' </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2010-11-12 20:59:25StephenHudson(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 24: </td> <td> Line 24: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * ''I had the same experience -- I was planning on an EEC major until ENG 17. Eventually I ended up in CS. -- ["Users/StephenHudson"]''</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2010-11-03 18:13:12MysticHLE <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 147: </td> <td> Line 147: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * ''Had professor Farrens too. He is a good lecturer, but was not very on top of things in terms of class organization. We didn't have a web page set up nor had any homeworks until about 4th week into the quarter, in which he announced that we would have weekly quizzes and told us we would need to design 3 CPUs in the remaining weeks. Work load was quite heavy. Quizzes were open book/notes, midterm and final allowed 1 and 2 sheets of notes (respectively). Class is not to be taken lightly.--["User/MysticHLE"]''</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2010-11-03 17:52:27MysticHLE <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 141: </td> <td> Line 141: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * ''Had professor Ghosal for this class. He was not very fluent in the subject and stuttered a lot. He was hard to follow and often digressed to his field of networks. Easy midterm and final though. Auditing professor Farren's class this quarter, I would much rather have had him. If you're ECS though, you will get an opportunity to revisit most of this stuff in EEC 180A/ECS 154B. -- ["Users/MysticHLE"]''<br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2010-11-03 17:36:13MysticHLE <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 106: </td> <td> Line 106: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * ''Took this class with professor Olsson. Great guy and lecturer. Easy to follow - explains things well. Make sure you know your recursion really well - and be very attentive to details. The professor even came down to the dungeon once to help us on a program...outside of his/TA's office hours! Very difficult final exam, however. "A bullet" would be rather appropriate to describe its element of surprise and difficulty as opposed to "a curved ball." -- ["Users/MysticHLE"]''</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2010-11-03 09:25:11MysticHLE <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 86: </td> <td> Line 86: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * ''Professor Gusfield was rather disorganized. Lectures were pretty hard to follow at times, but were interesting. No programming assignments - heavily theoretical class. You learn about a few very impressive/ingenious algorithms, such as the Z-Algorithm for string matching. -- ["Users/MysticHLE"]''</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 100: </td> <td> Line 101: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * ''Took this course with Professor Matloff - pretty much your private school-quality professor teaching at the public university. To some people, he may talk a bit slow...but if you are patient and really care to learn the stuff, this class is for you. You are presented with lots of challenging and practical probability problems (makes STA 32 midterms/final exams look like jokes). Best $20 (from Bookstore) I've ever spent on any textbook. No regrets taking this class whatsoever. =) --["Users/MysticHLE"]''</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2010-08-01 13:08:31SebastianNg <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 193: </td> <td> Line 193: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * ''When I took this course, we were writing a register allocator. Previous times, they were writing a instruction scheduler. --[Users/SebastianNg]'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * ''When I took this course, we were writing a register allocator. Previous times, they were writing a instruction scheduler. --[<span>"</span>Users/SebastianNg<span>"</span>]'' </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2010-08-01 13:06:37SebastianNg <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 193: </td> <td> Line 193: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * ''When I took this course, we were writing a register allocator. Previous times, they were writing a instruction scheduler. --[Users/SebastianNg]'' </td> <td> <span>+ </span> * ''When I took this course, we were writing a register allocator. Previous times, they were writing a instruction scheduler. --[Users/SebastianNg]'' </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2010-08-01 13:04:50SebastianNg <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 53: </td> <td> Line 53: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * ''I just finished TAing for Sean Davis for Summer Session 1 and I definitely recommend Sean for this class. His homework is very comprehensive. Each problem tests a different aspect of what you're learning. His tests are pretty good. --["Users/SebastianNg"]''<br> + </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 154: </td> <td> Line 156: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + * ''This is a project class. About 80% of your grade will be in projects. The project will be building a database system from scratch. Make sure your C/C++ skills are decent. Also, if you're taking this with Prof Green, he seems to not like the STL (which is why I added the C part). --["Users/SebastianNg"]''</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 187: </td> <td> Line 191: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ''ECS 243 '' - This class is taught by Kent Wilken in the ECE department. Class is a continuation of ECS 142(Compilers). You definitely don't need to take Compilers to take this one since they are independent to each other. In Compilers, you learn about the front-end of the compiler (basically, taking a program written in a high level language and converting to assembly). In this course, you will be taking the assembly and optimizing it, so that it runs faster. The projects for this course will follow what you learn in class.<br> + <br> + * ''When I took this course, we were writing a register allocator. Previous times, they were writing a instruction scheduler. --[Users/SebastianNg]''<br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2010-04-05 21:18:15SebastianNg <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 183: </td> <td> Line 183: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ''ECS 201A'' - Taught by Professor Farrens. You take what you learn in ECS 154B and expand upon it. You look into problems like interrupt handling, improving performance by numerous methods like instruction reordering, branch prediction logic, etc...</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2010-04-05 21:13:25SebastianNg <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 93: </td> <td> Line 93: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ''ECS 130 - Introduction to Scientific Computation'' Course is focused on learning about algorithms that are used in scientific community such as interpolation, curve fitting, solving linear equations, quadrature, eigenpair calculations, SVD, etc... You also learn about implementation problems. The class is a mix of engineering 6 and Math 22A/67/167/128ABC. Programming is done in Matlab.<br> + <br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2010-01-16 17:07:21SebastianNg <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 187: </td> <td> Line 187: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ''ECS 277 - Advanced Visualization'' - This class is pretty much a continuation of ECS 177. A lot of what you learn in 177 be will completely demolished as you will learn better techniques of visualization. This class seems to be very focused on better ways of interpolating data.<br> + <br> + * ''I took this course with Bernd Hamann and it was very time consuming. It was a good class and I learned a lot. I would recommend doing a GSR while taking this class. --["Users/SebastianNg"]''<br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2009-11-09 11:35:00TusharRawatcomment <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 192: </td> <td> Line 192: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * ''But you can the other way around, ECS 188 in place of ECS 190. 190 is probably easier though.'' - ["TusharRawat" TR]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2009-11-03 22:10:06TusharRawat(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 110: </td> <td> Line 110: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * ''Took it with Prof. Matloff in Spring '09. Excellent class, highly recommend. The class focus<span>s</span>ed on Python and R. --["TusharRawat" TR]'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * ''Took it with Prof. Matloff in Spring '09. Excellent class, highly recommend. The class focused on Python and R. --["TusharRawat" TR]'' </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2009-11-03 22:09:42TusharRawatcomments <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 110: </td> <td> Line 110: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * ''Took it with Prof. Matloff in Spring '09. Excellent class, highly recommend. The class focussed on Python and R. --["TusharRawat" TR]''</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 135: </td> <td> Line 136: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * ''Had Prof. Farrens for this. Projects were very challenging but class is amazing if you like Architecture. Projects same as above --["TusharRawat" TR]''</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 174: </td> <td> Line 176: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * ''I took this class with Professor Rogaway. His expectations are very clear: Do the reading, the quizzes are easy. Participate in discussion. Oh there's a paper and project at the end and a final quiz as well. A good complement to more difficult classes. --["TusharRawat" TR]''<br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2009-06-15 23:34:36SebastianNg <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 107: </td> <td> Line 107: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * ''Took this class with Professor Sean Peisert and turned out a lot easier than I thought. T<span>ook the </span>c<span>lass P/NP and now regret it. It's</span> a lot of work, but it really isn't all that bad in terms of difficulty<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span>-- ["Users/SebastianNg"]'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * ''Took this class with Professor Sean Peisert and turned out a lot easier than I thought. T<span>he proje</span>c<span>ts are</span> a lot of work, but it really isn't all that bad in terms of difficulty<span>. Tests are pretty straightforward</span>-- ["Users/SebastianNg"]'' </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2009-06-15 23:32:13SebastianNg <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 104: </td> <td> Line 104: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- * Class is offered Spring 2009</span> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + * Class is offered Spring 2009<br> + <br> + * ''Took this class with Professor Sean Peisert and turned out a lot easier than I thought. Took the class P/NP and now regret it. It's a lot of work, but it really isn't all that bad in terms of difficulty -- ["Users/SebastianNg"]''</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2009-06-01 21:51:29SebastianNg <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 156: </td> <td> Line 156: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * ''This class is terrible. Professor Ma is one of the worst lecturers ever. Everything you learn will be from reading the research papers, not from lecture. While the projects are interesting, they take an ungodly amount of time in order to complete. A component of your project grade is based off of "impressing" Professor Ma. This engendered a very cut-throat atmosphere where students would no longer help each other as this would be helping the competition. - ["Users/AlexGarbutt"]<span>"<br> - </span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> * ''This class is terrible. Professor Ma is one of the worst lecturers ever. Everything you learn will be from reading the research papers, not from lecture. While the projects are interesting, they take an ungodly amount of time in order to complete. A component of your project grade is based off of "impressing" Professor Ma. This engendered a very cut-throat atmosphere where students would no longer help each other as this would be helping the competition. - ["Users/AlexGarbutt"]<span>''</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2009-06-01 21:50:49SebastianNg <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 167: </td> <td> Line 167: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 168: </td> <td> Line 169: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2009-06-01 21:50:26SebastianNg <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 158: </td> <td> Line 158: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * ''Took the class with Professor Amenta. It was a fun class. You do three projects with different groups each time. You have three different visualization projects that deal with different types of Scientific Visualizations. --["Users/SebastianNg]'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * ''Took the class with Professor Amenta. It was a fun class. You do three projects with different groups each time. You have three different visualization projects that deal with different types of Scientific Visualizations. --["Users/SebastianNg<span>"</span>]'' </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 166: </td> <td> Line 166: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * ''Do not take this class. Take ENG 190 instead.<span>''</span> -- ["Users/KenBloom"]'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * ''Do not take this class. Take ENG 190 instead. -- ["Users/KenBloom"]'' </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2009-06-01 21:49:42SebastianNg <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 165: </td> <td> Line 165: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * ''Do not take this class. Take ENG 190 instead.'' -- ["Users/KenBloom"] </td> <td> <span>+ <br> +</span> * ''Do not take this class. Take ENG 190 instead.'' -- ["Users/KenBloom"]<span>''</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2009-06-01 21:48:49SebastianNg <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 182: </td> <td> Line 182: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * ''I don't think you can take this class in place of ECS 188 anymore''<br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2009-06-01 21:47:05SebastianNg <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 115: </td> <td> Line 115: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * ''I would skip this course and just start with 152B. This is not a big programming class. It's more focused on solving high school algebra word problems. -- ["Users/SebastianNg"]'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * ''I would skip this course and just start with 152B. This is not a big programming class. It's more focused on solving high school algebra word problems<span>&nbsp;and memorizing terms</span>. -- ["Users/SebastianNg"]'' </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 152: </td> <td> Line 152: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * <span>"</span>Took the class with Bernd Hamann in Winter of '07. I remember the times when I was in the lab from opening to closing during the weekend to get work done. It's a lot of work, but it's pretty fun if you're into that sort of stuff. -- ["Users/SebastianNg"]<span>"</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> * <span>''</span>Took the class with Bernd Hamann in Winter of '07. I remember the times when I was in the lab from opening to closing during the weekend to get work done. It's a lot of work, but it's pretty fun if you're into that sort of stuff. -- ["Users/SebastianNg"]<span>''</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 156: </td> <td> Line 156: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * <span>"</span>This class is terrible. Professor Ma is one of the worst lecturers ever. Everything you learn will be from reading the research papers, not from lecture. While the projects are interesting, they take an ungodly amount of time in order to complete. A component of your project grade is based off of "impressing" Professor Ma. This engendered a very cut-throat atmosphere where students would no longer help each other as this would be helping the competition. - ["Users/AlexGarbutt"]" </td> <td> <span>+</span> * <span>''</span>This class is terrible. Professor Ma is one of the worst lecturers ever. Everything you learn will be from reading the research papers, not from lecture. While the projects are interesting, they take an ungodly amount of time in order to complete. A component of your project grade is based off of "impressing" Professor Ma. This engendered a very cut-throat atmosphere where students would no longer help each other as this would be helping the competition. - ["Users/AlexGarbutt"]" </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 158: </td> <td> Line 158: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * <span>"</span>Took the class with Professor Amenta. It was a fun class. You do three projects with different groups each time. You have three different visualization projects that deal with different types of Scientific Visualizations. --["Users/SebastianNg<span>"</span>]<span>"</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> * <span>''</span>Took the class with Professor Amenta. It was a fun class. You do three projects with different groups each time. You have three different visualization projects that deal with different types of Scientific Visualizations. --["Users/SebastianNg]<span>''</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2009-06-01 21:44:20SebastianNg <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 115: </td> <td> Line 115: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * ''I would skip this course and just start with 152B. This is not a big programming class. It's more focused on solving high school algebra word problems. -- ["Users/SebastianNg"]''</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2009-06-01 21:36:42SebastianNg <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 78: </td> <td> Line 78: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * ''Took this class with Professor Filkov. Really interesting, but also really hard too. Probably the hardest class I have taken in the CS department -- ["Users/SebastianNg"]''<br> + </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 88: </td> <td> Line 90: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 122: </td> <td> Line 125: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 131: </td> <td> Line 135: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 132: </td> <td> Line 137: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 135: </td> <td> Line 141: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 144: </td> <td> Line 151: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * "Took the class with Bernd Hamann in Winter of '07. I remember the times when I was in the lab from opening to closing during the weekend to get work done. It's a lot of work, but it's pretty fun if you're into that sort of stuff. -- ["Users/SebastianNg"]"<br> + </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 145: </td> <td> Line 154: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * This class is terrible. Professor Ma is one of the worst lecturers ever. Everything you learn will be from reading the research papers, not from lecture. While the projects are interesting, they take an ungodly amount of time in order to complete. A component of your project grade is based off of "impressing" Professor Ma. This engendered a very cut-throat atmosphere where students would no longer help each other as this would be helping the competition. - ["Users/AlexGarbutt"]<br> -<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;* Took the class with Professor Amenta. It was a fun class. You do three projects with different groups each time. You have three different visualization projects that deal with different types of Scientific Visualizations. </span>-["Users/SebastianNg"] </td> <td> <span>+ <br> +</span> * <span>"</span>This class is terrible. Professor Ma is one of the worst lecturers ever. Everything you learn will be from reading the research papers, not from lecture. While the projects are interesting, they take an ungodly amount of time in order to complete. A component of your project grade is based off of "impressing" Professor Ma. This engendered a very cut-throat atmosphere where students would no longer help each other as this would be helping the competition. - ["Users/AlexGarbutt"]<span>"</span><br> <span>+ <br> + * "Took the class with Professor Amenta. It was a fun class. You do three projects with different groups each time. You have three different visualization projects that deal with different types of Scientific Visualizations. </span>--["Users/SebastianNg"]<span>"</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2009-04-10 22:44:30SebastianNg <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 123: </td> <td> Line 123: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- * ''More like... laziest professor. He's great for this class, but you can so tell he's just being lazy. -- ["Users/SebastianNg"]''</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2009-04-04 19:40:47wujianqiu(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 160: </td> <td> Line 160: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> <span>"</span>ECS 220 <span>"</span> - It was taught by Franklin when I took it. Only theory on complexity, very,very heavy stuff and tough reading. </td> <td> <span>+</span> <span>''</span>ECS 220 <span>''</span> - It was taught by Franklin when I took it. Only theory on complexity, very,very heavy stuff and tough reading. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2009-04-04 19:40:18wujianqiu <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 159: </td> <td> Line 159: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + "ECS 220 " - It was taught by Franklin when I took it. Only theory on complexity, very,very heavy stuff and tough reading.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2009-03-26 15:34:30TusharRawat(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 136: </td> <td> Line 136: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * ''A straightforward class on the theory and implementation of databases. The language of choice seems to have moved from Oracle to MySQL, although it may depend on the year taught or professor. A lot of students outside of purely Engineering and Computer Science take this course. -- ["TusharRawat" TR]''</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2009-03-26 15:29:10TusharRawat(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 123: </td> <td> Line 123: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * <span>"</span>More like... laziest professor. He's great for this class, but you can so tell he's just being lazy. -- ["Users/SebastianNg"]<span>"</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> * <span>''</span>More like... laziest professor. He's great for this class, but you can so tell he's just being lazy. -- ["Users/SebastianNg"]<span>''</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2009-03-26 15:27:36TusharRawat(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 90: </td> <td> Line 90: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ''ECS 132 - Probability and Statistical Modeling for Computer Science'': First offered in Winter 2008, this class is the CS equivalent to STA 131A<span>. T</span>his class provides an introduction to popular models of probability and statistics. Students start at the basic one-variable discrete to multivariate continuous models. This class (since 2009) is a requirement for ECS majors; an elective for CS majors. </td> <td> <span>+</span> ''ECS 132 - Probability and Statistical Modeling for Computer Science'': First offered in Winter 2008, this class is the CS equivalent to STA 131A<span>; t</span>his class provides an introduction to popular models of probability and statistics. Students start at the basic one-variable discrete<span>&nbsp;models and progress</span> to multivariate continuous models. This class (since 2009) is a requirement for ECS majors; an elective for CS majors. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2009-03-26 15:26:49TusharRawat(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 91: </td> <td> Line 91: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * Norm Matloff teaches this course. One of the harder courses offered by the CS department, it's completely worth it. --["TusharRawat" TR] </td> <td> <span>+</span> * <span>''</span>Norm Matloff teaches this course. One of the harder courses offered by the CS department, it's completely worth it. --["TusharRawat" TR]<span>''</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2009-03-26 15:25:43TusharRawat(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 90: </td> <td> Line 90: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- ''ECS 132 - Probability and Statistical Modeling for Computer Science'': New course offered for Winter 2008, taught by Norman Matloff.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ ''ECS 132 - Probability and Statistical Modeling for Computer Science'': First offered in Winter 2008, this class is the CS equivalent to STA 131A. This class provides an introduction to popular models of probability and statistics. Students start at the basic one-variable discrete to multivariate continuous models. This class (since 2009) is a requirement for ECS majors; an elective for CS majors.<br> + * Norm Matloff teaches this course. One of the harder courses offered by the CS department, it's completely worth it. --["TusharRawat" TR]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2009-02-23 23:18:37SebastianNg <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 100: </td> <td> Line 100: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * Class is offered Spring 2009</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2009-02-23 21:03:13SebastianNg <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 121: </td> <td> Line 121: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * "More like... laziest professor. He's great for this class, but you can so tell he's just being lazy. -- ["Users/SebastianNg"]"</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 143: </td> <td> Line 144: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * Took the class with Professor Amenta. It was a fun class. You do three projects with different groups each time. You have three different visualization projects that deal with different types of Scientific Visualizations. -["Users/SebastianNg"]</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 146: </td> <td> Line 148: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * Professor Bernd Hamann taught it winter of 2008.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2009-02-19 16:10:12StephenHudson(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 57: </td> <td> Line 57: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + * ''Somewhat time-consuming, occasionally challenging but mostly just getting used to producing a full-size program that actually works. With Ken Joy, he gives a big scary lecture at the beginning of the quarter that makes it seem like nobody will pass the class without working in large groups to conceptualize the problems, but it turns out not being to difficult. Expect to spend 5-10 hours per week writing and debugging. Although it's probably a good idea to go to lectures, you can get by without attending if you know how to use Google and Wikipedia. --["Users/StephenHudson"]''</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2009-02-19 16:03:52StephenHudson(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 51: </td> <td> Line 51: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * ''Simple programming. If you have any programming experience, the book is mostly a reference and is where all the homework comes from. Unless programming concepts are new to you, this is a class that you don't really need to work that hard on. An hour or two once a week for homework, but no conceptually challenging problems at all. Lectures are fairly straightforward coverage of the textbook, so you can get some of the homework out of the way in class. --["Users/StephenHudson"]'' </td> <td> <span>+ </span> * ''Simple programming. If you have any programming experience, the book is mostly a reference and is where all the homework comes from. Unless programming concepts are new to you, this is a class that you don't really need to work that hard on. An hour or two once a week for homework, but no conceptually challenging problems at all. Lectures are fairly straightforward coverage of the textbook, so you can get some of the homework out of the way in class. --["Users/StephenHudson"]'' </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2009-02-19 16:03:25StephenHudson(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 51: </td> <td> Line 51: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * ''Simple programming. If you have any programming experience, the book is mostly a reference and is where all the homework comes from. Unless programming concepts are new to you, this is a class that you don't really need to work that hard on. An hour or two once a week for homework, but no conceptually challenging problems at all. Lectures are fairly straightforward coverage of the textbook, so you can get some of the homework out of the way in class. --["Users/StephenHudson"]''</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2009-01-06 13:24:02TusharRawatreview 154A <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 117: </td> <td> Line 117: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * ''I second this. -- ["Users/TusharRawat" TR]''</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2009-01-03 17:57:13TimJHouse keeping/comments <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 61: </td> <td> Line 61: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- ''ECS 60 - Data Structures and Programming'': Replaces ECS 110 effective Fall 2007. According to ["Sean Davis"], the course content is the same as 110. Indeed, many of his handouts during the Fall 2007 quarter were still titled "ECS 110."</span> </td> <td> <span>+ ''ECS 60 - Data Structures and Programming'': Design and analysis of data structures for a variety of applications. Trees, heaps, searching, sorting, hashing, graphs. Extensive programming. This course replaced ECS 110 in Fall 2007. According to ["Sean Davis"], the course content is the same as 110. Indeed, many of his handouts during the Fall 2007 quarter were still titled "ECS 110."<br> + <br> + * ''Conceptually, this class was very straight-forward for me. The quarter was pretty easy until we got to the challenge programs, where we had to beat his times. I probably spent about 60 hours on both challenge programs. This is the first time I really took advantage of his 5-minute-program-fix-time during OH. I also learned more in this class than any other lower division CS class. Our main programs were writing a Sudoku solver, implementing a BTree, and two challenge programs, one relating to the stock market (matching sellers to buyers and vice versa), and one relating to network flow. --["Users/TimJ"]''</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 65: </td> <td> Line 67: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ''ECS 110 -<span>&nbsp;'''Replaced by ECS 60'''.</span> Data Structures and Programming'': The next logical extension in the "basic programming" track from ECS40, 110 is the software-side gateway to most upper division ECS courses. The course covers using basic data structures such as arrays, stacks/queues, trees, hash tables for applications like sorting and graph problems. Taking this class with ["Sean Davis"] is a lot harder than with any other instructor, as his programs are a lot harder and he grades submitted programs based on their running time. Nevertheless, those who survive Davis usually recommend it as a positive experience in hindsight. </td> <td> <span>+</span> ''ECS 110 - Data Structures and Programming'': The next logical extension in the "basic programming" track from ECS40, 110 is the software-side gateway to most upper division ECS courses. The course covers using basic data structures such as arrays, stacks/queues, trees, hash tables for applications like sorting and graph problems. Taking this class with ["Sean Davis"] is a lot harder than with any other instructor, as his programs are a lot harder and he grades submitted programs based on their running time. Nevertheless, those who survive Davis usually recommend it as a positive experience in hindsight.<span>&nbsp;This class was replaced by ECS 60 in Fall 2007.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2008-12-30 00:11:41TimJAdded stubs for the 165/166 database series. <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 126: </td> <td> Line 126: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ''ECS 165A - Database Systems'': Database design, entity-relationship and relational model, relational algebra, query language SQL, storage and file structures, query processing, system architectures.<br> + <br> + ''ECS 165B - Database Systems'': Advanced database systems: object-oriented and object-relational database systems; distributed and multidatabase systems; advanced database applications: Web-based database access, data warehouses.<br> + <br> + ''ECS 166 - Scientific Data Management'': Relational databases, SQL, non-standard databases, XML, scientific workflows, interoperability, data analysis tools, metadata.<br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2008-12-08 17:46:45TimJ(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 138: </td> <td> Line 138: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * ''I took this class with Professor Franklin. The class consisted of discussions, weekly write-ups, and a term paper/presentation. The discussion were very enjoyable, the readings interesting, and the grading straight-forward. Recommended if you just need a break from the other CS classes.-- ["Users/TimJ"]'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * ''I took this class with Professor Franklin. The class consisted of discussions, weekly write-ups, and a term paper/presentation. The discussion<span>s</span> were very enjoyable, the readings interesting, and the grading straight-forward. Recommended if you just need a break from the other CS classes.-- ["Users/TimJ"]'' </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2008-10-30 14:36:05TimJcomments. <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 55: </td> <td> Line 55: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * ''This class was very educational, but time-consuming. You develop a more advanced understanding of UNIX, learn C++, and get an introduction to data structures. Following coding standards is a must in this class-- you get points taken off for not commenting your code and the likes. Overall a good class, takes lots of time, but not overly difficult-- ["Users/TimJ"]''</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 136: </td> <td> Line 137: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * I enjoyed this class. There is more work than is expected of a 3 unit class, but Earl is a nice guy. Easy to talk to. He provided plenty of feedback on the paper and presentation that we gave at the end of the quarter. Thumbs up, - ["Users/AlexGarbutt"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> * <span>''</span>I enjoyed this class. There is more work than is expected of a 3 unit class, but Earl is a nice guy. Easy to talk to. He provided plenty of feedback on the paper and presentation that we gave at the end of the quarter. Thumbs up, - ["Users/AlexGarbutt"]<span>''<br> + * ''I took this class with Professor Franklin. The class consisted of discussions, weekly write-ups, and a term paper/presentation. The discussion were very enjoyable, the readings interesting, and the grading straight-forward. Recommended if you just need a break from the other CS classes.-- ["Users/TimJ"]''</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2008-10-20 12:33:59TimJcomments were deleted. Re-added with respect to comments added since. <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 82: </td> <td> Line 82: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * ''Overall an interesting course, although I felt like I didn't get much practical experience. Like Tushar said, the course material hasn't changed much, but Gusfield is a very smart man. A good primer course in bioinformatics, though I would recommend taking BIT 150 after CS 124 to gain more practical knowledge. -- ["Users/TimJ" TimJ]''</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2008-10-07 13:45:43AndrewHarrison <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 44: </td> <td> Line 44: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * ''I'm going to have to agree with Tim here, though I'm sure it depends upon what teachers you have. Together though, the two are great preparation for CS 40 and 60 (of course, being requirements). I also had Gusfield for 30 and Filkov for 20 (took it at the same time as Tim). I found Filkov to be an enjoyable and effective teacher --["Users/AndrewHarrison"]''</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2008-09-09 18:07:10JasonAllerlink fix <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 124: </td> <td> Line 124: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ["OliverKreylos"] taught this for his first time in Spring 2005 and worked his students to death. Basically they had to implement a full rendering pipeline, ending with hierarchical models and an advanced graphics project of the student's choosing (not unlike ECS275). </td> <td> <span>+</span> ["<span>Users/</span>OliverKreylos"] taught this for his first time in Spring 2005 and worked his students to death. Basically they had to implement a full rendering pipeline, ending with hierarchical models and an advanced graphics project of the student's choosing (not unlike ECS275). </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2008-08-31 12:05:01JasonAllerlink fixes <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 23: </td> <td> Line 23: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * ''I am an ECS major, and I found the ENG 17 and EEC 180a to be quite painful. I also found that EEC 180a was almost completely a repetition of things I had learned in ECS 154a and ECS 154b (see below). But EEC172 was a lot of fun, and practically requires these circuits courses as prerequisites. Given the choice again, knowing what I know now. I probably would have chosen CS instead. -- ["KenBloom"]'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * ''I am an ECS major, and I found the ENG 17 and EEC 180a to be quite painful. I also found that EEC 180a was almost completely a repetition of things I had learned in ECS 154a and ECS 154b (see below). But EEC172 was a lot of fun, and practically requires these circuits courses as prerequisites. Given the choice again, knowing what I know now. I probably would have chosen CS instead. -- ["<span>Users/</span>KenBloom"]'' </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 37: </td> <td> Line 37: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * ''This was a quarter-long torture chamber. Honestly, I didn't feel like I learned much of anything, and classes were boring and difficult. I heard it was easy if you get Sniegowski as a teacher, but Filkov was difficult simply because he was not good at teaching the material. The only thing useful I've gained from it was learning Big-Oh notation.. most of the other things seem to just be intros to upper divisional classes on algorithms and such. Overall I think it could have been a useful class, but I really did not like my teacher. -- ["GiladGurantz"]''<br> <span>-</span> * ''I have to disagree (having taken it from Filkov), as I found the class comparatively interesting, if he did perhaps go a bit too slowly over some of the material. Since it was intended as an intro into the math useful for CS, I found it succeeded at that. -- ["AndreyGoder"]''<br> <span>-</span> * '' Don't take it with Amenta. Many many people had problems with her. I know everyone that was in that class did not do well that i have talked to. I took it last year. It wasn't that it was hard to learn, but she had problems teaching it. I still don't know how to do inductive proofs corrently. get it with dean snegowski.--["MarkMcDermott"]''<br> <span>-</span> * ''This class is exceedingly easy, especially if you take it ''after'' ECS 30. Dr. Patrice Koehl is easily the best teacher to take this course with. On a side note if anyone has trouble with concepts in this course I'd be happy to help them out. --["TusharRawat"]''<br> <span>-</span> * ''I have to disagree with the above comment. ECS 30 is absolutely irrelevant to this course-- no relation whatsoever. That being the case, I took CS 20 and CS 30 concurrently. If you haven't taken CS 30, don't worry. --["TimJ"]''<br> <span>-</span> * ''Did you take 30 with Davis? 20 with Koehl? If so, I'm sorry you feel that way. I found the classes, with those professors, very helpful in that order. Also, just noticed, but since you took them concurrently, doesn't my comment not apply to your situation...? --["TusharRawat" TR]''<br> <span>-</span> * ''I took 30 with Gusfield and 20 with Filkov. I took the classes concurrently, meaning I did not take 20 ''after'' 30 like you said. In general, 20 has nothing to do with 30... 30 is a programming course, while 20 is a discrete math (theory) course. You do no programming in CS 20, and no extensive algorithm work in CS 30. No need to apologize, I'm not attacking or anything, just putting it out there for the future students! --["TimJ"]'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * ''This was a quarter-long torture chamber. Honestly, I didn't feel like I learned much of anything, and classes were boring and difficult. I heard it was easy if you get Sniegowski as a teacher, but Filkov was difficult simply because he was not good at teaching the material. The only thing useful I've gained from it was learning Big-Oh notation.. most of the other things seem to just be intros to upper divisional classes on algorithms and such. Overall I think it could have been a useful class, but I really did not like my teacher. -- ["<span>Users/</span>GiladGurantz"]''<br> <span>+</span> * ''I have to disagree (having taken it from Filkov), as I found the class comparatively interesting, if he did perhaps go a bit too slowly over some of the material. Since it was intended as an intro into the math useful for CS, I found it succeeded at that. -- ["<span>Users/</span>AndreyGoder"]''<br> <span>+</span> * '' Don't take it with Amenta. Many many people had problems with her. I know everyone that was in that class did not do well that i have talked to. I took it last year. It wasn't that it was hard to learn, but she had problems teaching it. I still don't know how to do inductive proofs corrently. get it with dean snegowski.--["<span>Users/</span>MarkMcDermott"]''<br> <span>+</span> * ''This class is exceedingly easy, especially if you take it ''after'' ECS 30. Dr. Patrice Koehl is easily the best teacher to take this course with. On a side note if anyone has trouble with concepts in this course I'd be happy to help them out. --["<span>Users/</span>TusharRawat"]''<br> <span>+</span> * ''I have to disagree with the above comment. ECS 30 is absolutely irrelevant to this course-- no relation whatsoever. That being the case, I took CS 20 and CS 30 concurrently. If you haven't taken CS 30, don't worry. --["<span>Users/</span>TimJ"]''<br> <span>+</span> * ''Did you take 30 with Davis? 20 with Koehl? If so, I'm sorry you feel that way. I found the classes, with those professors, very helpful in that order. Also, just noticed, but since you took them concurrently, doesn't my comment not apply to your situation...? --["<span>Users/</span>TusharRawat" TR]''<br> <span>+</span> * ''I took 30 with Gusfield and 20 with Filkov. I took the classes concurrently, meaning I did not take 20 ''after'' 30 like you said. In general, 20 has nothing to do with 30... 30 is a programming course, while 20 is a discrete math (theory) course. You do no programming in CS 20, and no extensive algorithm work in CS 30. No need to apologize, I'm not attacking or anything, just putting it out there for the future students! --["<span>Users/</span>TimJ"]'' </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 47: </td> <td> Line 47: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * ''First two weeks spent on how to use Unix so that you can do your programming assignments in it. Then most of the course just goes through the basics of programming: loops, conditional statements, etc. etc. Decent difficulty for beginners.. I started early on assignments and had no problems at all, although it seemed that non-CS majors would wait and suffer a little. By the time pointers are introduced some people start having problems, but overall if you're a CS major this class should not be a problem (at least, if you're taking it with Sniegowski). -- ["GiladGurantz"]'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * ''First two weeks spent on how to use Unix so that you can do your programming assignments in it. Then most of the course just goes through the basics of programming: loops, conditional statements, etc. etc. Decent difficulty for beginners.. I started early on assignments and had no problems at all, although it seemed that non-CS majors would wait and suffer a little. By the time pointers are introduced some people start having problems, but overall if you're a CS major this class should not be a problem (at least, if you're taking it with Sniegowski). -- ["<span>Users/</span>GiladGurantz"]'' </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 49: </td> <td> Line 49: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * ''I agree with the above. A good lecturer is Sean Davis. He's a hard teacher, but you'll know your stuff at the end. As long as you put a decent effort into the programs you won't really need to study for tests. I studied 30 minutes total and got a 91% on the final - and I was not the best in the class, by far. Easy class compared to ECS 40. --["TusharRawat"]'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * ''I agree with the above. A good lecturer is Sean Davis. He's a hard teacher, but you'll know your stuff at the end. As long as you put a decent effort into the programs you won't really need to study for tests. I studied 30 minutes total and got a 91% on the final - and I was not the best in the class, by far. Easy class compared to ECS 40. --["<span>Users/</span>TusharRawat"]'' </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 53: </td> <td> Line 53: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * ''I really liked this course, though if you're not willing to put time (LOTS OF TIME) and effort into it, then expect not to do so well. Beginning of the course is also dedicated to learning Unix, but this time it's slightly more advanced so that you can make nifty shell scripts and the like. Programming assignments sometimes took awhile, and usually for the first few weeks you keep building off the same program that gets too complicated. However, towards the end the assignments lighten up slightly, and if you do the assignments the tests tend to not require too much studying. -- ["GiladGurantz"]'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * ''I really liked this course, though if you're not willing to put time (LOTS OF TIME) and effort into it, then expect not to do so well. Beginning of the course is also dedicated to learning Unix, but this time it's slightly more advanced so that you can make nifty shell scripts and the like. Programming assignments sometimes took awhile, and usually for the first few weeks you keep building off the same program that gets too complicated. However, towards the end the assignments lighten up slightly, and if you do the assignments the tests tend to not require too much studying. -- ["<span>Users/</span>GiladGurantz"]'' </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 57: </td> <td> Line 57: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * ''Dr. Farrens teaches CUSP for most of the course, touching briefly on MIPS and x86 at the end. --["TusharRawat" TR]'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * ''Dr. Farrens teaches CUSP for most of the course, touching briefly on MIPS and x86 at the end. --["<span>Users/</span>TusharRawat" TR]'' </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 65: </td> <td> Line 65: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * ''This class isn't as programming intensive as ECS 40, though there are some small written homeworks and two write-ups. Neither of the two "challenge" programs were far too difficult (NOTE: these are the programs where you have to beat his times), but I think we got lucky this quarter. I learned a fairly good amount. --["GiladGurantz"]'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * ''This class isn't as programming intensive as ECS 40, though there are some small written homeworks and two write-ups. Neither of the two "challenge" programs were far too difficult (NOTE: these are the programs where you have to beat his times), but I think we got lucky this quarter. I learned a fairly good amount. --["<span>Users/</span>GiladGurantz"]'' </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 74: </td> <td> Line 74: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * ''Dr. Martel is an extremely good lecturer for this course. The material is somewhat dense but the class itself is straightforward. -- ["TusharRawat" TR]'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * ''Dr. Martel is an extremely good lecturer for this course. The material is somewhat dense but the class itself is straightforward. -- ["<span>Users/</span>TusharRawat" TR]'' </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 80: </td> <td> Line 80: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * ''Dr. Gusfield covers Markov and Hidden Markov models and some statistical analysis as well. Gusfield is well known in the field so if you're interested in Bioinformatics/Computational Biology it's worthwhile to take the course. The material hasn't changed much at all in 6 years. -- ["TusharRawat" TR]'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * ''Dr. Gusfield covers Markov and Hidden Markov models and some statistical analysis as well. Gusfield is well known in the field so if you're interested in Bioinformatics/Computational Biology it's worthwhile to take the course. The material hasn't changed much at all in 6 years. -- ["<span>Users/</span>TusharRawat" TR]'' </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 120: </td> <td> Line 120: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * The projects in this class were actually fairly educational but Ma is the worst lecturer I've had in recent memory. - ["TravisGrathwell"]<br> <span>-</span> * I don't feel like the class accomplished its goals very well. I think it needs to have some homework assignments that force us to get breadth in our experience, beyond just where we choose to take our projects. One good thought would be to give us a couple dozen examples of bad interfaces and have us explain what's wrong with them. We wound up totally unprepared for our midterm. I personally hope that the TA, ["Steve Haroz"] will teach this class next time (he claims to be ''the'' usability guy in our department), and that he teaches based on a basic usability text, such as [http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/sim-explorer/explore-items/-/0125184069/0/101/1/none/purchase/ref%3Dpd%5Fsxp%5Fr0/002-3713289-0605665 Usability Engineering]. -- ["KenBloom"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> * The projects in this class were actually fairly educational but Ma is the worst lecturer I've had in recent memory. - ["<span>Users/</span>TravisGrathwell"]<br> <span>+</span> * I don't feel like the class accomplished its goals very well. I think it needs to have some homework assignments that force us to get breadth in our experience, beyond just where we choose to take our projects. One good thought would be to give us a couple dozen examples of bad interfaces and have us explain what's wrong with them. We wound up totally unprepared for our midterm. I personally hope that the TA, ["Steve Haroz"] will teach this class next time (he claims to be ''the'' usability guy in our department), and that he teaches based on a basic usability text, such as [http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/sim-explorer/explore-items/-/0125184069/0/101/1/none/purchase/ref%3Dpd%5Fsxp%5Fr0/002-3713289-0605665 Usability Engineering]. -- ["<span>Users/</span>KenBloom"] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 127: </td> <td> Line 127: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * This class is terrible. Professor Ma is one of the worst lecturers ever. Everything you learn will be from reading the research papers, not from lecture. While the projects are interesting, they take an ungodly amount of time in order to complete. A component of your project grade is based off of "impressing" Professor Ma. This engendered a very cut-throat atmosphere where students would no longer help each other as this would be helping the competition. - ["AlexGarbutt"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> * This class is terrible. Professor Ma is one of the worst lecturers ever. Everything you learn will be from reading the research papers, not from lecture. While the projects are interesting, they take an ungodly amount of time in order to complete. A component of your project grade is based off of "impressing" Professor Ma. This engendered a very cut-throat atmosphere where students would no longer help each other as this would be helping the competition. - ["<span>Users/</span>AlexGarbutt"] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 133: </td> <td> Line 133: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * ''Do not take this class. Take ENG 190 instead.'' -- ["KenBloom"]<br> <span>-</span> * I enjoyed this class. There is more work than is expected of a 3 unit class, but Earl is a nice guy. Easy to talk to. He provided plenty of feedback on the paper and presentation that we gave at the end of the quarter. Thumbs up, - ["AlexGarbutt"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> * ''Do not take this class. Take ENG 190 instead.'' -- ["<span>Users/</span>KenBloom"]<br> <span>+</span> * I enjoyed this class. There is more work than is expected of a 3 unit class, but Earl is a nice guy. Easy to talk to. He provided plenty of feedback on the paper and presentation that we gave at the end of the quarter. Thumbs up, - ["<span>Users/</span>AlexGarbutt"] </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2008-08-28 14:35:59TimJ <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 31: </td> <td> Line 31: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ''ECS 10 - Basic Concepts of Computing'': An introductory programming course intended for non-majors. This course used to teach Pascal,then Java, but they switched to Python sometime in late 2006 or early 2007. </td> <td> <span>+</span> ''ECS 10 - Basic Concepts of Computing'': An introductory programming course intended for non-majors. This course used to teach Pascal,then Java, but they switched to Python sometime in late 2006 or early 2007.<span>&nbsp;If taken with Professor Amenta, you can expect the course to go at a solid pace, and you will get into lots of graphical work.</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 71: </td> <td> Line 71: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ''ECS 122A - Algorithm Design and Analysis'': The second most theoretical course in the CS department. Analyze and design algorithms for problems like sorting, searching and graph traversal, and get introduced to the world of NP/NP-complete problems. Like ECS120, some professors will require more rigor than others. Students can expect a nauseous reaction upon having to sit through the same two weeks of sorting algorithm nonsense that they were likely already exposed to in ECS30, ECS110, and to a lesser extent 20 and 40.<span>&nbsp;[The course ECS122B is almost never taught.]</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> ''ECS 122A - Algorithm Design and Analysis'': The second most theoretical course in the CS department. Analyze and design algorithms for problems like sorting, searching and graph traversal, and get introduced to the world of NP/NP-complete problems. Like ECS120, some professors will require more rigor than others. Students can expect a nauseous reaction upon having to sit through the same two weeks of sorting algorithm nonsense that they were likely already exposed to in ECS30, ECS110, and to a lesser extent 20 and 40. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 75: </td> <td> Line 75: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + ''ECS 122B - Algorithm Design and Analysis'': This class is the sequel to 122A. According to the 2008-2010 course catalog, this class covers "Theory and practice of hard problems, and problems with complex algorithm solutions. NP-completeness, approximation algorithms, randomized algorithms, dynamic programming and branch and bound. Students do theoretical analysis, implementation and practical evaluations. Examples from parallel, string, graph, and geometric algorithms." ECS 122B is rarely taught, if ever.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2008-08-09 15:29:06TimJ(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 33: </td> <td> Line 33: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ''ECS 15 - Introduction to Computers'': Another introductory course. This one appears to focus more on computers themselves instead of simply using them. If taught by Davis, you'll get a taste of progamming in Python. Gives SciEng and Writing GE credit. </td> <td> <span>+</span> ''ECS 15 - Introduction to Computers'': Another introductory course. This one appears to focus more on computers themselves instead of simply using them. If taught by Davis, you'll get a taste of prog<span>r</span>amming in Python. Gives SciEng and Writing GE credit. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2008-08-09 15:28:54TimJ(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 33: </td> <td> Line 33: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ''ECS 15 - Introduction to Computers'': Another introductory course. This one appears to focus more on computers themselves instead of simply using them. Gives SciEng and Writing GE credit. </td> <td> <span>+</span> ''ECS 15 - Introduction to Computers'': Another introductory course. This one appears to focus more on computers themselves instead of simply using them. <span>&nbsp;If taught by Davis, you'll get a taste of progamming in Python. </span>Gives SciEng and Writing GE credit. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2008-08-09 14:23:42TimJ(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 43: </td> <td> Line 43: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * ''I took 30 with Gusfield and 20 with Filkov. I took the classes concurrently, meaning I did not take 20 ''after'' 30 like you said. In general, 20 has nothing to do with 30... 30 is a programming course, while 20 is a discrete math theory course. You do no programming in CS 20, and no extensive algorithm work in CS 30. --["TimJ"]'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * ''I took 30 with Gusfield and 20 with Filkov. I took the classes concurrently, meaning I did not take 20 ''after'' 30 like you said. In general, 20 has nothing to do with 30... 30 is a programming course, while 20 is a discrete math <span>(</span>theory<span>)</span> course. You do no programming in CS 20, and no extensive algorithm work in CS 30.<span>&nbsp;No need to apologize, I'm not attacking or anything, just putting it out there for the future students!</span> --["TimJ"]'' </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2008-08-09 14:22:51TimJ <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 43: </td> <td> Line 43: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * ''I took 30 with Gusfield and 20 with Filkov. I took the classes concurrently, meaning I did not take 20 ''after'' 30 like you said. In general, 20 has nothing to do with 30... 30 is a programming course, while 20 is a discrete math theory course. You do no programming in CS 20, and no extensive algorithm work in CS 30. --["TimJ"]''<br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2008-07-24 13:57:51TusharRawatopinions on courses <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 41: </td> <td> Line 41: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * ''I have to disagree with the above comment. ECS 30 is absolutely irrelevant to this course-- no relation whatsoever. That being the case, I took CS 20 and CS 30 concurrently. If you haven't taken CS 30, don't worry. --[<span>''</span>TimJ<span>''</span>]'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * ''I have to disagree with the above comment. ECS 30 is absolutely irrelevant to this course-- no relation whatsoever. That being the case, I took CS 20 and CS 30 concurrently. If you haven't taken CS 30, don't worry. --[<span>"</span>TimJ<span>"</span>]''<span><br> + * ''Did you take 30 with Davis? 20 with Koehl? If so, I'm sorry you feel that way. I found the classes, with those professors, very helpful in that order. Also, just noticed, but since you took them concurrently, doesn't my comment not apply to your situation...? --["TusharRawat" TR]''</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 53: </td> <td> Line 54: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + * ''Dr. Farrens teaches CUSP for most of the course, touching briefly on MIPS and x86 at the end. --["TusharRawat" TR]''</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 69: </td> <td> Line 72: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * ''Dr. Martel is an extremely good lecturer for this course. The material is somewhat dense but the class itself is straightforward. -- ["TusharRawat" TR]''</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 71: </td> <td> Line 75: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + * ''Dr. Gusfield covers Markov and Hidden Markov models and some statistical analysis as well. Gusfield is well known in the field so if you're interested in Bioinformatics/Computational Biology it's worthwhile to take the course. The material hasn't changed much at all in 6 years. -- ["TusharRawat" TR]''</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2008-07-02 13:14:13TimJ(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 116: </td> <td> Line 116: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ''ECS 177 - Introduction to Visualization'': Basics of Volume Data visualization (3d data like CT scans, or fluid simulations). Typically students learn about an implement all of the standard methods: a slicer, an isosurfacer, a direct volume renderer, and some sort of vector field visualizer. </td> <td> <span>+</span> ''ECS 177 - Introduction to Visualization'': Basics of Volume Data visualization (3d data like CT scans, or fluid simulations). Typically students learn about an<span>d</span> implement all of the standard methods: a slicer, an isosurfacer, a direct volume renderer, and some sort of vector field visualizer. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2008-07-02 13:13:28TimJ <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 41: </td> <td> Line 41: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * ''I have to disagree with the above comment. ECS 30 is absolutely irrelevant to this course-- no relation whatsoever. That being the case, I took CS 20 and CS 30 concurrently. If you haven't taken CS 30, don't worry. --[''TimJ'']''</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2008-06-06 20:45:14TimJ(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 69: </td> <td> Line 69: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ''ECS 124 - Theory and Practice of Bioinformatics'': First two weeks of the quarter cover learning Perl and exploring alignment software. Then you move onto better ways to find the optimal alignment of a sequence (i.e. not using brute force), and explore algorithms like Smith-Waterman, and you also learn about dynamic programming. Class is more theoretical than practical, and there is an assumption that you've dealt with tools such as BLAST before.<span>&nbsp;The class also lacks structure, and lectures and labs are very disorganized.</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> ''ECS 124 - Theory and Practice of Bioinformatics'': First two weeks of the quarter cover learning Perl and exploring alignment software. Then you move onto better ways to find the optimal alignment of a sequence (i.e. not using brute force), and explore algorithms like Smith-Waterman, and you also learn about dynamic programming. Class is more theoretical than practical, and there is an assumption that you've dealt with tools such as BLAST before. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2008-06-04 18:02:57TusharRawatnew course ECS 132 <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 71: </td> <td> Line 71: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ''ECS 132 - Probability and Statistical Modeling for Computer Science'': New course offered for Winter 2008, taught by Norman Matloff.<br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2008-06-02 15:54:24TimJMinor formatting fixes (inconsistent italics, etc.) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 67: </td> <td> Line 67: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * <span>"</span>I had professor Franklin for this class, there's no programming, lectures were boring, but it's an easy A. -- ["Users/Roozbeh"]'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * <span>''</span>I had professor Franklin for this class, there's no programming, lectures were boring, but it's an easy A. -- ["Users/Roozbeh"]'' </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 73: </td> <td> Line 73: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * <span>"</span>I took this class with professor Su, the programs arent very challenging nor very time consuming as in ECS40 or ECS110. -- ["Users/Roozbeh"]'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * <span>''</span>I took this class with professor Su, the programs arent very challenging nor very time consuming as in ECS40 or ECS110. -- ["Users/Roozbeh"]'' </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 84: </td> <td> Line 84: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * <span>"</span>Professor Wu has taught the class many times, and is very knowledgeable about the material. The programs arent very hard, although the operating system we used was FREEBSD, I personally used VM-Ware, and my FREEBSD crashed a lot, which got kind of annoying. The grading is very fair, and should be an easy A. -- ["Users/Roozbeh"]'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * <span>''</span>Professor Wu has taught the class many times, and is very knowledgeable about the material. The programs arent very hard, although the operating system we used was FREEBSD, I personally used VM-Ware, and my FREEBSD crashed a lot, which got kind of annoying. The grading is very fair, and should be an easy A. -- ["Users/Roozbeh"]'' </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 88: </td> <td> Line 88: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * <span>"</span>I had professor Ghosal for this class, although I didn't find the class very interesting, I ended up doing research for professor Ghosal. -- ["Users/Roozbeh"]'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * <span>''</span>I had professor Ghosal for this class, although I didn't find the class very interesting, I ended up doing research for professor Ghosal. -- ["Users/Roozbeh"]'' </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 98: </td> <td> Line 98: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * <span>"</span>Professor Farrens is one of the best professor I have had in UC Davis, and he did a great job in this class. The projects were fair and the exams were identical to the practice ones. -- ["Users/Roozbeh"]'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * <span>''</span>Professor Farrens is one of the best professor I have had in UC Davis, and he did a great job in this class. The projects were fair and the exams were identical to the practice ones. -- ["Users/Roozbeh"]'' </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 102: </td> <td> Line 102: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * <span>"</span>This is one of the most time consuming ECS classes ever. The projects took for ever! We had implement a single cycle CPU for our first project, a multi-cycle CPU for the second, and a pipelined cpu for the third, and the it keeps getting harder! The fourth project was a simulation which was pretty easy and straight forward! -- ["Users/Roozbeh"]'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * <span>''</span>This is one of the most time consuming ECS classes ever. The projects took for ever! We had implement a single cycle CPU for our first project, a multi-cycle CPU for the second, and a pipelined cpu for the third, and the it keeps getting harder! The fourth project was a simulation which was pretty easy and straight forward! -- ["Users/Roozbeh"]'' </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2008-05-18 21:29:57TimJ(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 69: </td> <td> Line 69: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ''ECS 124 - Theory and Practice of Bioinformatics'': First two weeks of the quarter cover learning Perl and exploring alignment software. Then you move onto better ways to find the optimal alignment of a sequence (i.e. not using brute force), and explore algorithms like Smith-Waterman, and you also learn about dynamic programming. Class is more theoretical than practical, and there is an assumption that you've dealt with tools such as BLAST before. </td> <td> <span>+</span> ''ECS 124 - Theory and Practice of Bioinformatics'': First two weeks of the quarter cover learning Perl and exploring alignment software. Then you move onto better ways to find the optimal alignment of a sequence (i.e. not using brute force), and explore algorithms like Smith-Waterman, and you also learn about dynamic programming. Class is more theoretical than practical, and there is an assumption that you've dealt with tools such as BLAST before.<span>&nbsp;The class also lacks structure, and lectures and labs are very disorganized.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2008-04-23 11:39:07TimJ <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 69: </td> <td> Line 69: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ''ECS 124 - Theory and Practice of Bioinfomatics'': First two weeks of the quarter cover learning Perl and exploring alignment software. Then you move onto better ways to find the optimal alignment of a sequence (i.e. not using brute force), and explore algorithms like Smith-Waterman, and you also learn about dynamic programming. Class is more theoretical than practical, and there is an assumption that you've dealt with tools such as BLAST before. </td> <td> <span>+</span> ''ECS 124 - Theory and Practice of Bioinfo<span>r</span>matics'': First two weeks of the quarter cover learning Perl and exploring alignment software. Then you move onto better ways to find the optimal alignment of a sequence (i.e. not using brute force), and explore algorithms like Smith-Waterman, and you also learn about dynamic programming. Class is more theoretical than practical, and there is an assumption that you've dealt with tools such as BLAST before. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2008-04-23 11:37:41TimJ(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 69: </td> <td> Line 69: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- "</span>ECS 124 - Theory and Practice of Bioinfomatics<span>"</span>: First two weeks of the quarter cover learning Perl and exploring alignment software. Then you move onto better ways to find the optimal alignment of a sequence (i.e. not using brute force), and explore algorithms like Smith-Waterman, and you also learn about dynamic programming. Class is more theoretical than practical, and there is an assumption that you've dealt with tools such as BLAST before. </td> <td> <span>+ ''</span>ECS 124 - Theory and Practice of Bioinfomatics<span>''</span>: First two weeks of the quarter cover learning Perl and exploring alignment software. Then you move onto better ways to find the optimal alignment of a sequence (i.e. not using brute force), and explore algorithms like Smith-Waterman, and you also learn about dynamic programming. Class is more theoretical than practical, and there is an assumption that you've dealt with tools such as BLAST before. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2008-04-23 11:37:23TimJ <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 68: </td> <td> Line 68: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + "ECS 124 - Theory and Practice of Bioinfomatics": First two weeks of the quarter cover learning Perl and exploring alignment software. Then you move onto better ways to find the optimal alignment of a sequence (i.e. not using brute force), and explore algorithms like Smith-Waterman, and you also learn about dynamic programming. Class is more theoretical than practical, and there is an assumption that you've dealt with tools such as BLAST before.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2008-01-12 18:22:01JasonAllerfixed links <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 61: </td> <td> Line 61: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * ''I have to disagree, unfortunately I didn't take this class from Sean Davis, and my instructor did not do a very good job. The challenge programs were really challenging, and my partner and I had to put a lot of time into it. My group was the only group that even tried the very last program in the class. We obtained 37/50 points, and everyone else got 0's in the class. -- ["Roozbeh"]'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * ''I have to disagree, unfortunately I didn't take this class from Sean Davis, and my instructor did not do a very good job. The challenge programs were really challenging, and my partner and I had to put a lot of time into it. My group was the only group that even tried the very last program in the class. We obtained 37/50 points, and everyone else got 0's in the class. -- ["<span>Users/</span>Roozbeh"]'' </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 67: </td> <td> Line 67: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * "I had professor Franklin for this class, there's no programming, lectures were boring, but it's an easy A. -- ["Roozbeh"]'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * "I had professor Franklin for this class, there's no programming, lectures were boring, but it's an easy A. -- ["<span>Users/</span>Roozbeh"]'' </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 71: </td> <td> Line 71: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * "I took this class with professor Su, the programs arent very challenging nor very time consuming as in ECS40 or ECS110. -- ["Roozbeh"]'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * "I took this class with professor Su, the programs arent very challenging nor very time consuming as in ECS40 or ECS110. -- ["<span>Users/</span>Roozbeh"]'' </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 82: </td> <td> Line 82: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * "Professor Wu has taught the class many times, and is very knowledgeable about the material. The programs arent very hard, although the operating system we used was FREEBSD, I personally used VM-Ware, and my FREEBSD crashed a lot, which got kind of annoying. The grading is very fair, and should be an easy A. -- ["Roozbeh"]'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * "Professor Wu has taught the class many times, and is very knowledgeable about the material. The programs arent very hard, although the operating system we used was FREEBSD, I personally used VM-Ware, and my FREEBSD crashed a lot, which got kind of annoying. The grading is very fair, and should be an easy A. -- ["<span>Users/</span>Roozbeh"]'' </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 86: </td> <td> Line 86: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * "I had professor Ghosal for this class, although I didn't find the class very interesting, I ended up doing research for professor Ghosal. -- ["Roozbeh"]'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * "I had professor Ghosal for this class, although I didn't find the class very interesting, I ended up doing research for professor Ghosal. -- ["<span>Users/</span>Roozbeh"]'' </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 96: </td> <td> Line 96: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * "Professor Farrens is one of the best professor I have had in UC Davis, and he did a great job in this class. The projects were fair and the exams were identical to the practice ones. -- ["Roozbeh"]'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * "Professor Farrens is one of the best professor I have had in UC Davis, and he did a great job in this class. The projects were fair and the exams were identical to the practice ones. -- ["<span>Users/</span>Roozbeh"]'' </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 100: </td> <td> Line 100: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * "This is one of the most time consuming ECS classes ever. The projects took for ever! We had implement a single cycle CPU for our first project, a multi-cycle CPU for the second, and a pipelined cpu for the third, and the it keeps getting harder! The fourth project was a simulation which was pretty easy and straight forward! -- ["Roozbeh"]'' </td> <td> <span>+</span> * "This is one of the most time consuming ECS classes ever. The projects took for ever! We had implement a single cycle CPU for our first project, a multi-cycle CPU for the second, and a pipelined cpu for the third, and the it keeps getting harder! The fourth project was a simulation which was pretty easy and straight forward! -- ["<span>Users/</span>Roozbeh"]'' </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2008-01-12 18:02:50Roozbeh <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 67: </td> <td> Line 67: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * "I had professor Franklin for this class, there's no programming, lectures were boring, but it's an easy A. -- ["Roozbeh"]''<br> + </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 68: </td> <td> Line 70: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + * "I took this class with professor Su, the programs arent very challenging nor very time consuming as in ECS40 or ECS110. -- ["Roozbeh"]''</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 78: </td> <td> Line 82: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * "Professor Wu has taught the class many times, and is very knowledgeable about the material. The programs arent very hard, although the operating system we used was FREEBSD, I personally used VM-Ware, and my FREEBSD crashed a lot, which got kind of annoying. The grading is very fair, and should be an easy A. -- ["Roozbeh"]''<br> + </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 79: </td> <td> Line 85: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + * "I had professor Ghosal for this class, although I didn't find the class very interesting, I ended up doing research for professor Ghosal. -- ["Roozbeh"]''</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 88: </td> <td> Line 96: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * "Professor Farrens is one of the best professor I have had in UC Davis, and he did a great job in this class. The projects were fair and the exams were identical to the practice ones. -- ["Roozbeh"]''<br> + </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 89: </td> <td> Line 99: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + * "This is one of the most time consuming ECS classes ever. The projects took for ever! We had implement a single cycle CPU for our first project, a multi-cycle CPU for the second, and a pipelined cpu for the third, and the it keeps getting harder! The fourth project was a simulation which was pretty easy and straight forward! -- ["Roozbeh"]''</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2008-01-12 17:53:23Roozbeh <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 60: </td> <td> Line 60: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + * ''I have to disagree, unfortunately I didn't take this class from Sean Davis, and my instructor did not do a very good job. The challenge programs were really challenging, and my partner and I had to put a lot of time into it. My group was the only group that even tried the very last program in the class. We obtained 37/50 points, and everyone else got 0's in the class. -- ["Roozbeh"]''</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2007-12-17 16:57:40MattMasudaclarify <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 53: </td> <td> Line 53: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ''ECS 60 - Data Structures and Programming'': Replaces ECS 110 effective Fall 2007. According to ["Sean Davis"], the course content is the same. Indeed, many of his handouts during the Fall 2007 quarter were still titled "ECS 110." </td> <td> <span>+</span> ''ECS 60 - Data Structures and Programming'': Replaces ECS 110 effective Fall 2007. According to ["Sean Davis"], the course content is the same<span>&nbsp;as 110</span>. Indeed, many of his handouts during the Fall 2007 quarter were still titled "ECS 110." </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2007-12-17 16:55:45MattMasudaInfo about ECS 60 vs. ECS 110 <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 53: </td> <td> Line 53: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- ''ECS 60 - Data Structures and Programming'': Replaces ECS 110 effective Fall 2007 -- on the surface there doesn't seem to be much difference, but who knows.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ ''ECS 60 - Data Structures and Programming'': Replaces ECS 110 effective Fall 2007. According to ["Sean Davis"], the course content is the same. Indeed, many of his handouts during the Fall 2007 quarter were still titled "ECS 110."</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2007-11-29 00:55:09AlexMandel(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 31: </td> <td> Line 31: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ''ECS 10 - Basic Concepts of Computing'': An introductory programming course intended for non-majors. This course used to teach Pascal, but they switched to Python sometime in late 2006 or early 2007. </td> <td> <span>+</span> ''ECS 10 - Basic Concepts of Computing'': An introductory programming course intended for non-majors. This course used to teach Pascal,<span>then Java,</span> but they switched to Python sometime in late 2006 or early 2007. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2007-06-27 21:48:26WilliamLewis(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 31: </td> <td> Line 31: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ''ECS 10 - Basic Concepts of Computing'': An introductory course intended for non-majors. This course used to teach Pascal, but they switched to Python sometime in late 2006 or early 2007. </td> <td> <span>+</span> ''ECS 10 - Basic Concepts of Computing'': An introductory <span>programming </span>course intended for non-majors. This course used to teach Pascal, but they switched to Python sometime in late 2006 or early 2007. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2007-06-27 21:22:33WilliamLewis(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 57: </td> <td> Line 57: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ''ECS 110 - '''Replaced by ECS 60'''. Data Structures and Programming'': The next logical extension in the "basic programming" track from ECS40, 110 is the software-side gateway to most upper division ECS courses. The course covers using basic data structures such as arrays, stacks/queues, trees, hash tables for applications like sorting and graph problems. Taking this class with ["Sean Davis"] is a lot harder than with any other <span>profess</span>or, as his programs are a lot harder and he grades submitted programs based on their running time. Nevertheless, those who survive Davis usually recommend it as a positive experience in hindsight. </td> <td> <span>+</span> ''ECS 110 - '''Replaced by ECS 60'''. Data Structures and Programming'': The next logical extension in the "basic programming" track from ECS40, 110 is the software-side gateway to most upper division ECS courses. The course covers using basic data structures such as arrays, stacks/queues, trees, hash tables for applications like sorting and graph problems. Taking this class with ["Sean Davis"] is a lot harder than with any other <span>instruct</span>or, as his programs are a lot harder and he grades submitted programs based on their running time. Nevertheless, those who survive Davis usually recommend it as a positive experience in hindsight. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2007-06-27 21:22:06WilliamLewis(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 57: </td> <td> Line 57: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ''ECS 110 - Data Structures and Programming'': The next logical extension in the "basic programming" track from ECS40, 110 is the software-side gateway to most upper division ECS courses. The course covers using basic data structures such as arrays, stacks/queues, trees, hash tables for applications like sorting and graph problems. Taking this class with ["Sean Davis"] is a lot harder than with any other professor, as his programs are a lot harder and he grades submitted programs based on their running time. Nevertheless, those who survive Davis usually recommend it as a positive experience in hindsight. </td> <td> <span>+</span> ''ECS 110 -<span>&nbsp;'''Replaced by ECS 60'''.</span> Data Structures and Programming'': The next logical extension in the "basic programming" track from ECS40, 110 is the software-side gateway to most upper division ECS courses. The course covers using basic data structures such as arrays, stacks/queues, trees, hash tables for applications like sorting and graph problems. Taking this class with ["Sean Davis"] is a lot harder than with any other professor, as his programs are a lot harder and he grades submitted programs based on their running time. Nevertheless, those who survive Davis usually recommend it as a positive experience in hindsight. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2007-06-27 21:19:53WilliamLewis(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 31: </td> <td> Line 31: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ''ECS 10 - Basic Concepts of Computing'': An introductory course intended for non-majors. </td> <td> <span>+</span> ''ECS 10 - Basic Concepts of Computing'': An introductory course intended for non-majors.<span>&nbsp;This course used to teach Pascal, but they switched to Python sometime in late 2006 or early 2007.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2007-05-19 04:27:14BillBroadleyColony has nothing to do with Computer Science. <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 9: </td> <td> Line 9: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- * ["COLONY"]</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 11: </td> <td> Line 10: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- </span> * ["Grad Cave"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> * ["Grad Cave"] </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2007-05-14 01:15:16KateWaterman(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 54: </td> <td> Line 54: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> <span>"</span>ECS 60 - Data Structures and Programming<span>"</span>: Replaces ECS 110 effective Fall 2007 -- on the surface there doesn't seem to be much difference, but who knows. </td> <td> <span>+</span> <span>''</span>ECS 60 - Data Structures and Programming<span>''</span>: Replaces ECS 110 effective Fall 2007 -- on the surface there doesn't seem to be much difference, but who knows. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2007-05-14 01:14:47KateWatermanfall class change <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 36: </td> <td> Line 36: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ''ECS 20 - Discrete Mathematics for Computer Science'': A fairly simple logic course. Subjects covered include logical proofs, graph theory, and solving of recurrence relations; the kind of math to prepare you for analy<span>s</span>ing algorithms in 122A. </td> <td> <span>+</span> ''ECS 20 - Discrete Mathematics for Computer Science'': A fairly simple logic course. Subjects covered include logical proofs, graph theory, and solving of recurrence relations; the kind of math to prepare you for analy<span>z</span>ing algorithms in 122A. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 54: </td> <td> Line 54: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ "ECS 60 - Data Structures and Programming": Replaces ECS 110 effective Fall 2007 -- on the surface there doesn't seem to be much difference, but who knows.<br> + </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 56: </td> <td> Line 58: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ''ECS 110 - Data Structures and Programming'': The next logical extension in the "basic programming" track from ECS40, 110 is the software-side gateway to most upper divison ECS courses. The course covers using basic data structures such as arrays, stacks/queues, trees, hash tables for applications like sorting and graph problems. Taking this class with ["Sean Davis"] is a lot harder than with any other professor, as his programs are a lot harder and he grades submitted programs based on their running time. Nevertheless, those who survive Davis usually recommend it as a positive experience in hindsight. </td> <td> <span>+</span> ''ECS 110 - Data Structures and Programming'': The next logical extension in the "basic programming" track from ECS40, 110 is the software-side gateway to most upper divis<span>i</span>on ECS courses. The course covers using basic data structures such as arrays, stacks/queues, trees, hash tables for applications like sorting and graph problems. Taking this class with ["Sean Davis"] is a lot harder than with any other professor, as his programs are a lot harder and he grades submitted programs based on their running time. Nevertheless, those who survive Davis usually recommend it as a positive experience in hindsight. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 62: </td> <td> Line 64: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ''ECS 122A - Algorithm Design and Analysis'': The second most theoretical course in the CS department. Analy<span>s</span>e and design algorithms for problems like sorting, searching and graph traversal, and get introduced to the world of NP/NP-complete problems. Like ECS120, some professors will require more rigor than others. Students can expect a nauseous reaction upon having to sit through the same two weeks of sorting algorithm nonsense that they were likely already exposed to in ECS30, ECS110, and to a lesser extent 20 and 40. [The course ECS122B is almost never taught.] </td> <td> <span>+</span> ''ECS 122A - Algorithm Design and Analysis'': The second most theoretical course in the CS department. Analy<span>z</span>e and design algorithms for problems like sorting, searching and graph traversal, and get introduced to the world of NP/NP-complete problems. Like ECS120, some professors will require more rigor than others. Students can expect a nauseous reaction upon having to sit through the same two weeks of sorting algorithm nonsense that they were likely already exposed to in ECS30, ECS110, and to a lesser extent 20 and 40. [The course ECS122B is almost never taught.] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 96: </td> <td> Line 98: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ''ECS 177 - Introduction to Visualization'': Basics of Volume Data visu<span>la</span>zation (3d data like CT scans, or fluid simulations). Typically students learn about an implement all of the standard methods: a slicer, an isosurfacer, a direct volume renderer, and some sort of vector field visualizer.<br> <span>-</span> * This class is terrible. Professor Ma is one of the worst lecturers ever. Everything you learn will be from reading the research papers, not from lecture. While the projects are interesting, they take an ungodly amount of time in order to complete. A component of your project grade is based off of "impressing" Professor Ma. This engendered a very cut-throat atmos<span>hp</span>ere where students would no longer help each other as this would be helping the competition. - ["AlexGarbutt"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> ''ECS 177 - Introduction to Visualization'': Basics of Volume Data visu<span>ali</span>zation (3d data like CT scans, or fluid simulations). Typically students learn about an implement all of the standard methods: a slicer, an isosurfacer, a direct volume renderer, and some sort of vector field visualizer.<br> <span>+</span> * This class is terrible. Professor Ma is one of the worst lecturers ever. Everything you learn will be from reading the research papers, not from lecture. While the projects are interesting, they take an ungodly amount of time in order to complete. A component of your project grade is based off of "impressing" Professor Ma. This engendered a very cut-throat atmos<span>ph</span>ere where students would no longer help each other as this would be helping the competition. - ["AlexGarbutt"] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 100: </td> <td> Line 102: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> This course has been cancelled for 2005-2006, no petition has yet been started. There definitely shoud be one though. </td> <td> <span>+</span> This course has been cancelled for 2005-2006, no petition has yet been started. There definitely shou<span>l</span>d be one though. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2007-03-12 21:52:37TusharRawatECS 30 comment <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 45: </td> <td> Line 45: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + * ''I agree with the above. A good lecturer is Sean Davis. He's a hard teacher, but you'll know your stuff at the end. As long as you put a decent effort into the programs you won't really need to study for tests. I studied 30 minutes total and got a 91% on the final - and I was not the best in the class, by far. Easy class compared to ECS 40. --["TusharRawat"]''</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2007-03-12 21:47:16TusharRawatECS 20 comment <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 41: </td> <td> Line 41: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * ''This class is exceedingly easy, especially if you take it ''after'' ECS 30. Dr. Patrice Koehl is easily the best teacher to take this course with. On a side note if anyone has trouble with concepts in this course I'd be happy to help them out. --["TusharRawat"]''</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 70: </td> <td> Line 71: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ''ECS 150 - Operating Systems'': An interesting class if you're into this kind of thing, and goes over scheduling processes, semaphores, memory, page tables, etc. This is an easy class if you take it with Wu. He's a nice guy, knows his stuff, and will tell the occasional story/joke plus the occasional slip (blahblahblah where I met my first wife, I mean, ONLY wife, ONLY wife, heh...). His tests however are multiple choice and each question is worth about 2% of your grade. Also, the little boxes on just about each slide of his slide presentations make absolutely no sense until he explains them. And if you don't take notes, the little boxes will make absolutely no sense to you again when you take your printouts to the tests. The best TA ever was Sophie.<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> ''ECS 150 - Operating Systems'': An interesting class if you're into this kind of thing, and goes over scheduling processes, semaphores, memory, page tables, etc. This is an easy class if you take it with Wu. He's a nice guy, knows his stuff, and will tell the occasional story/joke plus the occasional slip (blahblahblah where I met my first wife, I mean, ONLY wife, ONLY wife, heh...). His tests however are multiple choice and each question is worth about 2% of your grade. Also, the little boxes on just about each slide of his slide presentations make absolutely no sense until he explains them. And if you don't take notes, the little boxes will make absolutely no sense to you again when you take your printouts to the tests. The best TA ever was Sophie. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 78: </td> <td> Line 79: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ''ECS 153 - Computer Security'': An interesting class if you're into that kind of thing. Contrary to what most people might think, this class does not teach you how to hack (sorry). The vulnerabilities used as examples should have been fixed long ago (at least we'd expect so). With an academic view of security, it goes over different security models, spotting bad coding habits, legal issues, Sun Tzu, encryption, authenticating messages, viruses, worms, etc.<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> ''ECS 153 - Computer Security'': An interesting class if you're into that kind of thing. Contrary to what most people might think, this class does not teach you how to hack (sorry). The vulnerabilities used as examples should have been fixed long ago (at least we'd expect so). With an academic view of security, it goes over different security models, spotting bad coding habits, legal issues, Sun Tzu, encryption, authenticating messages, viruses, worms, etc. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2006-05-02 15:04:25AlexGarbutt <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 101: </td> <td> Line 101: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * I enjoyed this class. There is more work than is expected of a 3 unit class, but Earl is a nice guy. Easy to talk to. He provided plenty of feedback on the paper and presentation that we gave at the end of the quarter. Thumbs up, - ["AlexGarbut"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> * I enjoyed this class. There is more work than is expected of a 3 unit class, but Earl is a nice guy. Easy to talk to. He provided plenty of feedback on the paper and presentation that we gave at the end of the quarter. Thumbs up, - ["AlexGarbut<span>t</span>"] </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2006-04-07 13:45:47KateWatermanadded link (sort of) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 22: </td> <td> Line 22: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> The Computer Science (CS) major is a B.S. in the College of ["Letters and Science"]. It requires you to choose from one of three science tracks Bio, Chem or Physics. It also requires a couple more math courses. If you want to learn about <span>Bioinformatics</span>, then ''do not'' major in CSE, becasue you won't have room for the Biology that you need to learn Bioinformatics. </td> <td> <span>+</span> The Computer Science (CS) major is a B.S. in the College of ["Letters and Science"]. It requires you to choose from one of three science tracks Bio, Chem or Physics. It also requires a couple more math courses. If you want to learn about <span>["Quantitative Biology and Bioinformatics" Bioinformatics]</span>, then ''do not'' major in CSE, becasue you won't have room for the Biology that you need to learn Bioinformatics. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2006-04-07 13:42:36KateWatermanlinkity <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> It offers two B.S. degrees: one in Computer Science, which is given by the ["Letters and Science" College of Letters and Science], and one in Computer Science Engineering, given by the ["College of Engineering"], as well as a 24-unit <span>minor</span>. CS majors are allowed more freedom in the courses they take, as, unlike Engineering majors, they do not have almost all 180 units planned out for them. They also don't have to take any Communication or English classes. The primary difference between the majors is that the CSE major focuses significantly more on software/hardware interactions, while the CS major is more software-oriented. They are very similar otherwise. </td> <td> <span>+</span> It offers two B.S. degrees: one in Computer Science, which is given by the ["Letters and Science" College of Letters and Science], and one in Computer Science Engineering, given by the ["College of Engineering"], as well as a 24-unit <span>["minors" minor]</span>. CS majors are allowed more freedom in the courses they take, as, unlike Engineering majors, they do not have almost all 180 units planned out for them. They also don't have to take any Communication or English classes. The primary difference between the <span>["</span>majors<span>"]</span> is that the CSE major focuses significantly more on software/hardware interactions, while the CS major is more software-oriented. They are very similar otherwise. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2006-03-15 11:33:22MarkMcDermott <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 40: </td> <td> Line 40: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- </span> </td> <td> <span>+ * '' Don't take it with Amenta. Many many people had problems with her. I know everyone that was in that class did not do well that i have talked to. I took it last year. It wasn't that it was hard to learn, but she had problems teaching it. I still don't know how to do inductive proofs corrently. get it with dean snegowski.--["MarkMcDermott"]''</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2006-01-25 12:22:41BrentLaabslink to CSIF <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 10: </td> <td> Line 10: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * ["CSIF"] / ["The Dungeon"]<br> + * ["Grad Cave"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2006-01-25 07:47:35AlexGarbutt <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 72: </td> <td> Line 72: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ''ECS 152B - Computer Networks'': Rather than going over the concepts of the networking stack, actually gain some experience writing client/server programs and utilizing TCP/IP.<br> + <br> + ''ECS 152C - Computer Networks'': Wireless networks.<br> + </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 88: </td> <td> Line 92: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * This class is terrible. Professor Ma is one of the worst lecturers ever. Everything you learn will be from reading the research papers, not from lecture. While the projects are interesting, they take an ungodly amount of time in order to complete. A component of your project grade is based off of "impressing" Professor Ma. This engendered a very cut-throat atmoshpere where students would no longer help each other as this would be helping the competition. - ["AlexGarbutt"]</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 90: </td> <td> Line 95: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ This course has been cancelled for 2005-2006, no petition has yet been started. There definitely shoud be one though.</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 91: </td> <td> Line 97: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ''ECS 188 - Ethics and the Information Age'': CS and CSE require a "Professional Responsibilities/Ethics" class. This fills that requirement. This deals with philosophy of ethics and the ethical issues that may be involved in Computer Science applications. ''Do not take this class. Take ENG 190 instead.'' -- ["KenBloom"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> ''ECS 188 - Ethics and the Information Age'': CS and CSE require a "Professional Responsibilities/Ethics" class. This fills that requirement. This deals with philosophy of ethics and the ethical issues that may be involved in Computer Science applications.<span><br> + *</span> ''Do not take this class. Take ENG 190 instead.'' -- ["KenBloom"]<span><br> + * I enjoyed this class. There is more work than is expected of a 3 unit class, but Earl is a nice guy. Easy to talk to. He provided plenty of feedback on the paper and presentation that we gave at the end of the quarter. Thumbs up, - ["AlexGarbut"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2006-01-01 19:09:07TravisGrathwellminus stupid sentence <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 108: </td> <td> Line 108: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> There is also a ["Computer Science Club"] for CS students.<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;One assumes that the CSE folks are allowed to join in, though one could be wrong.</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> There is also a ["Computer Science Club"] for CS students. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2005-09-22 17:10:00JasonAller <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 6: </td> <td> Line 6: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + == Departmental Resources ==<br> + <br> + * ["COLONY"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2005-08-31 17:49:47IreneParkadded brief blurb for CS Club <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 102: </td> <td> Line 102: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + == Computer Science Club ==<br> + There is also a ["Computer Science Club"] for CS students. One assumes that the CSE folks are allowed to join in, though one could be wrong.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2005-08-15 14:38:01AndreyGoderAdded some comments on ecs20 <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 33: </td> <td> Line 33: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * ''I have to disagree (having taken it from Filkov), as I found the class comparatively interesting, if he did perhaps go a bit too slowly over some of the material. Since it was intended as an intro into the math useful for CS, I found it succeeded at that. -- ["AndreyGoder"]''</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Computer Sciencehttp://daviswiki.org/Computer_Science2005-06-16 10:57:15KenBloomscathing review of ecs163 <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Computer Science<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 48: </td> <td> Line 48: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * ''This class isn't as programming intensive as ECS 40, though there are some small written homeworks and two write-ups. Neither of the two "challenge" programs were far too difficult (NOTE: these are the programs where you have to beat his times), but I think we got lucky this quarter. I learned a fairly good amount. --["GiladGurantz"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> * ''This class isn't as programming intensive as ECS 40, though there are some small written homeworks and two write-ups. Neither of the two "challenge" programs were far too difficult (NOTE: these are the programs where you have to beat his times), but I think we got lucky this quarter. I learned a fairly good amount. --["GiladGurantz"]<span>''</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 75: </td> <td> Line 75: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ''ECS 163 - Information Interfaces'': The GUI class, a breath of fresh air for those sick of making console programs. This <span>is starting to sound a bit more like the general principles of human computer interaction, rather than a "how to" class for those who want to be prepared to go out into industry</span>. Offered for the first time in Spring 2005, the class was composed of two projects: first, to make a program that visualizes a directory structure (most people did a [http://www.cs.umd.edu/hcil/treemap/ Treemap]), second, to form a group of 4 or 5 and make a website. The guidelines for the second project were very loose.<br> <span>- </span> The projects in this class were actually fairly educational but Ma is the worst lecturer I've had in recent memory. - ["TravisGrathwell"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> ''ECS 163 - Information Interfaces'': The GUI class, a breath of fresh air for those sick of making console programs. This <span>class was intended to focus on the principles of visualizations and the principles of human-computer interaction</span>.<span>&nbsp;</span> Offered for the first time in Spring 2005, the class was composed of two projects: first, to make a program that visualizes a directory structure (most people did a [http://www.cs.umd.edu/hcil/treemap/ Treemap]), second, to form a group of 4 or 5 and make a website. The guidelines for the second project were very loose.<br> <span>+ *</span> The projects in this class were actually fairly educational but Ma is the worst lecturer I've had in recent memory. - ["TravisGrathwell"]<span><br> + * I don't feel like the class accomplished its goals very well. I think it needs to have some homework assignments that force us to get breadth in our experience, beyond just where we choose to take our projects. One good thought would be to give us a couple dozen examples of bad interfaces and have us explain what's wrong with them. We wound up totally unprepared for our midterm. I personally hope that the TA, ["Steve Haroz"] will teach this class next time (he claims to be ''the'' usability guy in our department), and that he teaches based on a basic usability text, such as [http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/sim-explorer/explore-items/-/0125184069/0/101/1/none/purchase/ref%3Dpd%5Fsxp%5Fr0/002-3713289-0605665 Usability Engineering]. -- ["KenBloom"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div>