Recent Changes for "Davis Water Wells" - Davis Wikihttp://daviswiki.org/Davis_Water_WellsRecent Changes of the page "Davis Water Wells" on Davis Wiki.en-us Davis Water Wellshttp://daviswiki.org/Davis_Water_Wells2010-04-12 11:53:48ScottMeehleibFun Fact: "separate" is one of the most commonly misspelled words on the Web. <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Davis Water Wells<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Currently, all the water supplied by the city comes from an aquifer. In general, the city sits over an aquifer system with two distinct layers. The upper layer, known as the intermediate depth aquifer, extends approximately 700 feet below the ground surface. A second layer is known as the deep depth aquifer, is sep<span>e</span>rated from the intermediate depth aquifer by a less permeable clay layer. Originally, the city supplied all its water from the intermediate depth aquifer. In recent years however, in order to achieve greater water quality, the city has begun shifting its water supply over to the deep depth aquifer. Older wells in Davis typically extend 300 to 600 feet below the ground surface, while newer deep wells in Davis may extend 1500 to 1800 feet below the ground surface. A depth chart of all the well in davis can be seen [http://cityofdavis.org/pw/water/pdfs/Well_Profiles_Color.pdf here]. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Currently, all the water supplied by the city comes from an aquifer. In general, the city sits over an aquifer system with two distinct layers. The upper layer, known as the intermediate depth aquifer, extends approximately 700 feet below the ground surface. A second layer is known as the deep depth aquifer, is sep<span>a</span>rated from the intermediate depth aquifer by a less permeable clay layer. Originally, the city supplied all its water from the intermediate depth aquifer. In recent years however, in order to achieve greater water quality, the city has begun shifting its water supply over to the deep depth aquifer. Older wells in Davis typically extend 300 to 600 feet below the ground surface, while newer deep wells in Davis may extend 1500 to 1800 feet below the ground surface. A depth chart of all the well in davis can be seen [http://cityofdavis.org/pw/water/pdfs/Well_Profiles_Color.pdf here]. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Davis Water Wellshttp://daviswiki.org/Davis_Water_Wells2010-02-25 12:04:50JabberWokky <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Davis Water Wells<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 8: </td> <td> Line 8: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> [[Image(map.gif, thumbnail, right, "From Davis Water Dept. site")]] </td> <td> <span>+</span> [[Image(map.gif, thumbnail<span>, 500</span>, right, "From Davis Water Dept. site")]] </td> </tr> </table> </div> Davis Water Wellshttp://daviswiki.org/Davis_Water_Wells2010-02-25 08:26:25CovertEngineer(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Davis Water Wells<p><strong></strong></p>No differences found!</div> Davis Water Wellshttp://daviswiki.org/Davis_Water_Wells2010-02-25 08:26:18CovertEngineer(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Davis Water Wells<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Currently, all the water supplied by the city comes from an aquifer. In general, the city sits over an aquifer system with two distinct layers. The upper layer, known as the intermediate depth aquifer, extends approximately 700 feet below the ground surface. A second layer is known as the deep depth aquifer, <span>and</span> seperated from the intermediate depth aquifer by a less permeable clay layer. Originally, the city supplied all its water from the intermediate depth aquifer. In recent years however, in order to achieve greater water quality, the city has begun shifting its water supply over to the deep depth aquifer. Older wells in Davis typically extend 300 to 600 feet below the ground surface, while newer deep wells in Davis may extend 1500 to 1800 feet below the ground surface. A depth chart of all the well in davis can be seen [http://cityofdavis.org/pw/water/pdfs/Well_Profiles_Color.pdf here]. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Currently, all the water supplied by the city comes from an aquifer. In general, the city sits over an aquifer system with two distinct layers. The upper layer, known as the intermediate depth aquifer, extends approximately 700 feet below the ground surface. A second layer is known as the deep depth aquifer, <span>is</span> seperated from the intermediate depth aquifer by a less permeable clay layer. Originally, the city supplied all its water from the intermediate depth aquifer. In recent years however, in order to achieve greater water quality, the city has begun shifting its water supply over to the deep depth aquifer. Older wells in Davis typically extend 300 to 600 feet below the ground surface, while newer deep wells in Davis may extend 1500 to 1800 feet below the ground surface. A depth chart of all the well in davis can be seen [http://cityofdavis.org/pw/water/pdfs/Well_Profiles_Color.pdf here]. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Davis Water Wellshttp://daviswiki.org/Davis_Water_Wells2010-02-24 16:37:45CovertEngineerto WL <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Davis Water Wells<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- ''How deep does a well have to be to be a "deep well"? What's the average depth of the normal well?''</span> </td> <td> <span>+ Currently, all the water supplied by the city comes from an aquifer. In general, the city sits over an aquifer system with two distinct layers. The upper layer, known as the intermediate depth aquifer, extends approximately 700 feet below the ground surface. A second layer is known as the deep depth aquifer, and seperated from the intermediate depth aquifer by a less permeable clay layer. Originally, the city supplied all its water from the intermediate depth aquifer. In recent years however, in order to achieve greater water quality, the city has begun shifting its water supply over to the deep depth aquifer. Older wells in Davis typically extend 300 to 600 feet below the ground surface, while newer deep wells in Davis may extend 1500 to 1800 feet below the ground surface. A depth chart of all the well in davis can be seen [http://cityofdavis.org/pw/water/pdfs/Well_Profiles_Color.pdf here].<br> + <br> + More information on the city's water system can be found in its [http://cityofdavis.org/pw/water/pdfs/2005-Urban-Water-Management-Plan-Update.pdf urban water management plan].</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Davis Water Wellshttp://daviswiki.org/Davis_Water_Wells2010-02-24 12:24:48WilliamLewisok, so these have been built. <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Davis Water Wells<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 27: </td> <td> Line 27: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- <br> - =Planned Wells=</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 31: </td> <td> Line 29: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * ["Davis Deep Well 31"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Davis Water Wellshttp://daviswiki.org/Davis_Water_Wells2010-02-24 12:18:26WilliamLewisI'm looking for the answer myself, putting this up if someone has faster answers <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Davis Water Wells<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 2: </td> <td> Line 2: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + ''How deep does a well have to be to be a "deep well"? What's the average depth of the normal well?''</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Davis Water Wellshttp://daviswiki.org/Davis_Water_Wells2007-03-20 10:11:10DavidPooleUpload of image <a href="http://daviswiki.org/Davis_Water_Wells?action=Files&do=view&target=map.gif">map.gif</a>.Davis Water Wellshttp://daviswiki.org/Davis_Water_Wells2007-03-20 10:10:57DavidPoole <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Davis Water Wells<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- [[Image(map.gif, thumbnail, right, "From Davis Water Dept. site")]]</span> Davis water wells are the source of the ["tap water"] in Davis. These are scattered about town and generally the water from the faucet comes from the nearest well(s). Also note that the ["water towers"] are used in the distribution scheme to maintain pressure and distribution across the system. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Davis water wells are the source of the ["tap water"] in Davis. These are scattered about town and generally the water from the faucet comes from the nearest well(s). Also note that the ["water towers"] are used in the distribution scheme to maintain pressure and distribution across the system. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 4: </td> <td> Line 4: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ [[Image(map.gif, thumbnail, right, "From Davis Water Dept. site")]]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Davis Water Wellshttp://daviswiki.org/Davis_Water_Wells2007-03-20 10:10:28DavidPoolePerhaps pointless, but still amusing to create, photos? <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Davis Water Wells<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ [[Image(map.gif, thumbnail, right, "From Davis Water Dept. site")]] Davis water wells are the source of the ["tap water"] in Davis. These are scattered about town and generally the water from the faucet comes from the nearest well(s). Also note that the ["water towers"] are used in the distribution scheme to maintain pressure and distribution across the system.<br> + <br> + =Currently Operational Wells=<br> + * ["Davis Well 1"]<br> + * ["Davis Well 7"]<br> + * ["Davis Well 11"]<br> + * ["Davis Well 12"]<br> + * ["Davis Well 13"]<br> + * ["Davis Well 14"]<br> + * ["Davis Well 15"] - May be abandoned<br> + * ["Davis Well 18"]<br> + * ["Davis Well 19"]<br> + * ["Davis Well 20"]<br> + * ["Davis Well 21"]<br> + * ["Davis Well 22"]<br> + * ["Davis Well 23"]<br> + * ["Davis Well 24"]<br> + * ["Davis Well 25"]<br> + * ["Davis Well 26"]<br> + * ["Davis Well 27"]<br> + * ["Davis Deep Well 28"]<br> + * ["Davis Well EM-2"]<br> + * ["Davis Well EM-3"]<br> + <br> + =Planned Wells=<br> + * ["Davis Deep Well 29"]<br> + * ["Davis Deep Well 30"]<br> + =Abandoned Wells=<br> + * ["Davis Well 16"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div>