Recent Changes for "Philosophy" - Davis Wikihttp://daviswiki.org/PhilosophyRecent Changes of the page "Philosophy" on Davis Wiki.en-us Philosophyhttp://daviswiki.org/Philosophy2012-04-18 14:55:50RobertaMIllstein <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Philosophy<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 17: </td> <td> Line 17: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + == Second Annual Undergraduate Writing Contest =<br> + <br> + See http://philosophy.ucdavis.edu/undergraduate-program/2012EssayPoster.pdf for details. Submission deadline is April 30, 2012.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Philosophyhttp://daviswiki.org/Philosophy2012-04-18 14:51:30RobertaMIllstein <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Philosophy<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 31: </td> <td> Line 31: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> <span>=</span>= UCD Philosophy Courses =<span>=</span><br> <span>-</span> <span>=</span>== Rev. Chad's recommended courses ==<span>=</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> = UCD Philosophy Courses =<br> <span>+</span> == Rev. Chad's recommended courses == </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 52: </td> <td> Line 52: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> <span>=</span>== aec's recommendations ==<span>=</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> == aec's recommendations == </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 66: </td> <td> Line 66: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> <span>=</span>== Other recommendations ==<span>=</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> == Other recommendations == </td> </tr> </table> </div> Philosophyhttp://daviswiki.org/Philosophy2012-04-18 14:50:30RobertaMIllstein <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Philosophy<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 15: </td> <td> Line 15: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + = Events =<br> + <br> + == Food for Thought ==<br> + <br> + An afternoon of discussion and free pizza in the Philosophy Department library.<br> + <br> + === Apr 20, 2012 ===<br> + <br> + From 03:00 PM to 05:00 PM<br> + Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/406861145993042/<br> + <br> + IS TRUTH RELEVANT TO SCIENCE? led by Professor Emeritus Paul Teller<br> + <br> + Traditionally we think of science as seeking – and finding! - the exactly correct, universal laws of nature. This lecture will trace how this terrible misconception of science arose, how it has misdescribed science from the very beginning, and how it is finally coming unraveled.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Philosophyhttp://daviswiki.org/Philosophy2011-11-08 12:31:11RobertaMIllstein <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Philosophy<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 10: </td> <td> Line 10: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ||[https://www.facebook.com/pages/UC-Davis-Philosophy-Department/220830974608530]||</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Philosophyhttp://daviswiki.org/Philosophy2008-09-07 15:59:18JasonAllerlink fixes <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Philosophy<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 11: </td> <td> Line 11: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- </span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 15: </td> <td> Line 14: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- </span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 30: </td> <td> Line 28: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> 102. Theory of Knowledge amused ["RevChad"] and reinforced his general skepticism. </td> <td> <span>+</span> 102. Theory of Knowledge amused ["<span>Users/</span>RevChad"] and reinforced his general skepticism. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 36: </td> <td> Line 34: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> 157. Twentieth Century European Philosophy ["RevChad"] took Winter '05, since Mattey is cool and the philosophers seem crazy enough to be interesting. It turned out that he was right and the philosophers were crazy. This class is worth taking for a different kind of philosophy, but can be annoying as much of the work seems non-sensical to some. </td> <td> <span>+</span> 157. Twentieth Century European Philosophy ["<span>Users/</span>RevChad"] took Winter '05, since Mattey is cool and the philosophers seem crazy enough to be interesting. It turned out that he was right and the philosophers were crazy. This class is worth taking for a different kind of philosophy, but can be annoying as much of the work seems non-sensical to some. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 48: </td> <td> Line 46: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> -["AmeliaCarlson" aec] </td> <td> <span>+</span> -["<span>Users/</span>AmeliaCarlson" aec] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 70: </td> <td> Line 68: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ''I took 189B without ever having taken any other Philosophy course before and it wasn't difficult at all.'' - ["KenjiYamada"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> ''I took 189B without ever having taken any other Philosophy course before and it wasn't difficult at all.'' - ["<span>Users/</span>KenjiYamada"] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 72: </td> <td> Line 70: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ''I was really looking forward to 189I next quarter, does anyone know why it was cancelled?'' -["AmeliaCarlson" aec] </td> <td> <span>+</span> ''I was really looking forward to 189I next quarter, does anyone know why it was cancelled?'' -["<span>Users/</span>AmeliaCarlson" aec] </td> </tr> </table> </div> Philosophyhttp://daviswiki.org/Philosophy2008-02-29 11:37:06DavidPooleadded one reccomendation <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Philosophy<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 55: </td> <td> Line 55: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> 128. Rationality- This class is taught by Pekka and is really a grea. Take it after you have taken some logic courses but before upper division ethics classes because it will help out in those more than you think. </td> <td> <span>+</span> 128. Rationality- This class is taught by Pekka and is really a grea<span>t</span>. Take it after you have taken some logic courses but before upper division ethics classes because it will help out in those more than you think. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 62: </td> <td> Line 62: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + 160. Presocratics - This was one of the best classes I have taken, not only is professor Wedin awesome, the perspective gained from the review of the 'first philosophers' is such that it better defines what philosophy ought to be. As there are few texts this class offers additional insight into argument reconstruction, rather than simple presentation of arguments. (see the review below for a further prior testament to Wedin's awesomeness)</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Philosophyhttp://daviswiki.org/Philosophy2006-11-27 15:57:06JonathanNasca <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Philosophy<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 36: </td> <td> Line 36: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> 157. Twentieth Century European Philosophy ["RevChad"] took Winter '05, since Mattey is cool and the philosophers seem crazy enough to be interesting. It turned out that he was right and the philosophers were crazy. This class is worth taking for a different kind of philosophy, but can be annoying as much of the work seems non-sensical to some.<span>&nbsp;</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> 157. Twentieth Century European Philosophy ["RevChad"] took Winter '05, since Mattey is cool and the philosophers seem crazy enough to be interesting. It turned out that he was right and the philosophers were crazy. This class is worth taking for a different kind of philosophy, but can be annoying as much of the work seems non-sensical to some. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 57: </td> <td> Line 57: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ 168. Descartes- I like the classes the department offers about one philosopher and his combined works. I don't get to attend the class much due to work but when I go Mattey lays it out in a very easy to understand way Descartes not being so easy independent from a guiding light. Its a great class because it is the formal birth of an anti-Aristotleian rationalist program and some argue modern philosophy itself.<br> + <br> + 174. Hume- This class is amazing when it is offered. I took it when it was taught by Allison who is a powerhouse on Hume and Kant so the class is very enlightening in the scheme of empirical epistemology. Hume also isn't the easiest guy to jump in and understand but Allison lays out the work methodically and raises interesting objections that commentator's have somehow missed over the years. NOT for the faint of heart.<br> + <br> + 137. Philosophy of Language- This class was taught by Glanzberg who is also quite awesome though he has a large soft spot for Mr Frege. The class revolves around definite descriptions for the most part and works in some Strawson and Searle to counter russell and Frege as the bug guns. Since a lot of modern philosophy degrades into semantic bickering this class allows one to shovel some of the muck aside that has been growing thorugh the 20th century.<br> + <br> + 162. Aristotle- The classes about one philosophy and his collected works are great. If you have not taken a class taught by Wedin you're a fool because he is arguably the best lecturer in the department and a case can be made to crown him the best on campus. A thoroughly engaging class it analyzes his scientific program in the analytics, physics and metaphysics.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Philosophyhttp://daviswiki.org/Philosophy2005-08-24 22:01:47RevChadsmall typo correction <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Philosophy<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 36: </td> <td> Line 36: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> 157. Twentieth Century European Philosophy ["RevChad"] took Winter '05, since Mattey is cool and the philosophers seem crazy enough to be interesting. It turned out that he was right and the philosophers were crazy. This class is worth taking for a different kind of philosophy, but can be annoying as much of the work seems non-sensical <span>r</span>o some. </td> <td> <span>+</span> 157. Twentieth Century European Philosophy ["RevChad"] took Winter '05, since Mattey is cool and the philosophers seem crazy enough to be interesting. It turned out that he was right and the philosophers were crazy. This class is worth taking for a different kind of philosophy, but can be annoying as much of the work seems non-sensical <span>t</span>o some. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 59: </td> <td> Line 59: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> 189A-K. Special Topics in Philosophy (4)<span><br> -</span> Lecture/discussion—3 hours; extensive writing. Prerequisite: one course in the area of the special topic. Special topics in (A) History of Philosophy, (B) Metaphysics, (C) Theory of Knowledge, (D) Ethics, (E) Political Philosophy, (F) Philosophy of Law, (G) Aesthetics, (H) Philosophy of Mind, (I) Philosophy of Science, (J) Philosophy of Language, (K) Logic. May be repeated up to 8 units of credit. Not offered every year. </td> <td> <span>+</span> 189A-K. Special Topics in Philosophy (4) Lecture/discussion—3 hours; extensive writing. Prerequisite: one course in the area of the special topic. Special topics in (A) History of Philosophy, (B) Metaphysics, (C) Theory of Knowledge, (D) Ethics, (E) Political Philosophy, (F) Philosophy of Law, (G) Aesthetics, (H) Philosophy of Mind, (I) Philosophy of Science, (J) Philosophy of Language, (K) Logic. May be repeated up to 8 units of credit. Not offered every year. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Philosophyhttp://daviswiki.org/Philosophy2005-07-30 12:01:06JonathanNasca <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Philosophy<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 54: </td> <td> Line 54: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + 128. Rationality- This class is taught by Pekka and is really a grea. Take it after you have taken some logic courses but before upper division ethics classes because it will help out in those more than you think.<br> + <br> + <br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Philosophyhttp://daviswiki.org/Philosophy2005-06-12 18:05:55JasonAller <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Philosophy<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 22: </td> <td> Line 22: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Prof. Cummins is also an interesting lecturer. Expect not to understand everything from readings since he assigns articles from people deeply imbedded in whatever research and doesn't expect the students to understand everything. Plan to read through and get the basic idea. He also tends to give take home exams. </td> <td> <span>+ ["Robert Cummins"</span> Prof. Cummins<span>]</span> is also an interesting lecturer. Expect not to understand everything from readings since he assigns articles from people deeply imbedded in whatever research and doesn't expect the students to understand everything. Plan to read through and get the basic idea. He also tends to give take home exams. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Philosophyhttp://daviswiki.org/Philosophy2005-04-09 20:46:02RevChadexpanded and updated recommendations <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Philosophy<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 22: </td> <td> Line 22: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Prof. Cummins is also an interesting lecturer. Expect not to understand everything from readings since he assigns articles from people deeply imbedded in whatever research and doesn't expect the students to understand everything. Plan to read through and get the basic idea. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Prof. Cummins is also an interesting lecturer. Expect not to understand everything from readings since he assigns articles from people deeply imbedded in whatever research and doesn't expect the students to understand everything. Plan to read through and get the basic idea.<span>&nbsp;He also tends to give take home exams.</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 34: </td> <td> Line 34: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> 156. Contemporary Analytic Philosophy is fun and Cummins offers an interesting critique of the Analytic Philosophy you will see so much of. </td> <td> <span>+</span> 156. Contemporary Analytic Philosophy is fun and Cummins offers an interesting critique of the Analytic Philosophy you will see so much of<span>&nbsp;in UCD's philosophy department</span>. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 36: </td> <td> Line 36: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> 157. Twentieth Century European Philosophy ["RevChad"] <span>is signed up for this</span> Winter '05, since Mattey is cool and the philosophers seem crazy enough to be interesting. </td> <td> <span>+</span> 157. Twentieth Century European Philosophy ["RevChad"] <span>took</span> Winter '05, since Mattey is cool and the philosophers seem crazy enough to be interesting. <span>It turned out that he was right and the philosophers were crazy. This class is worth taking for a different kind of philosophy, but can be annoying as much of the work seems non-sensical ro some. </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Philosophyhttp://daviswiki.org/Philosophy2005-04-02 19:38:35ArlenAbrahami wiki therefore i am <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Philosophy<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 14: </td> <td> Line 14: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> UC Davis's Philosophy department is composed mostly of [<span>http</span>:<span>//en.w</span>iki<span>pedia.org/wiki/</span>Analytic_philosophy Analytic philosophers] though there are such classes as 19th Century and 20th Century Philosophy, and Winter 2005 has a Religious Existentialism class (198A). </td> <td> <span>+</span> UC Davis's Philosophy department is composed mostly of [<span>wiki</span>:<span>W</span>iki<span>Pedia:</span>Analytic_philosophy Analytic philosophers] though there are such classes as 19th Century and 20th Century Philosophy, and Winter 2005 has a Religious Existentialism class (198A). </td> </tr> </table> </div> Philosophyhttp://daviswiki.org/Philosophy2005-02-18 14:09:17AmeliaCarlsonspelling <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Philosophy<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 52: </td> <td> Line 52: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> === Other rec<span>c</span>omendations === </td> <td> <span>+</span> === Other reco<span>m</span>mendations === </td> </tr> </table> </div> Philosophyhttp://daviswiki.org/Philosophy2004-12-18 13:29:13AmeliaCarlsonstupid typo <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Philosophy<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 42: </td> <td> Line 42: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> 119. Philosophy of Law Take<span>.</span> <span>T</span>his class. Rosati is a great lecturer and the course gives valuable insights to current incoherent views of justice. </td> <td> <span>+</span> 119. Philosophy of Law<span>.</span> Take <span>t</span>his class. Rosati is a great lecturer and the course gives valuable insights to current incoherent views of justice. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Philosophyhttp://daviswiki.org/Philosophy2004-12-18 13:28:11AmeliaCarlsonsome recommendations <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Philosophy<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 36: </td> <td> Line 36: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- 157. Twentieth Century European Philosophy ["RevChad"] is signed up for this Winter '05, since Mattey is cool and the philosophers seem crazy enough to be interesting.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ 157. Twentieth Century European Philosophy ["RevChad"] is signed up for this Winter '05, since Mattey is cool and the philosophers seem crazy enough to be interesting. <br> + <br> + === aec's recommendations ===<br> + <br> + 108. Philosophy of Biology. This (I've heard said) is supposedly one of the hardest philo classes. I took it my first quarter at UCD, and it's still my favorite class.<br> + <br> + 119. Philosophy of Law Take. This class. Rosati is a great lecturer and the course gives valuable insights to current incoherent views of justice.<br> + <br> + 157. Twentieth Century European Philosophy I'm looking forward to this class. Of course I don't play well with analytic philosophy.<br> + <br> + ''this will actually be useful and updated soon.''<br> + <br> + -["AmeliaCarlson" aec]<br> + <br> + </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 39: </td> <td> Line 53: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- <br> - 119. Philosophy of Law ''Take this class.'' -["AmeliaCarlson" aec]</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Philosophyhttp://daviswiki.org/Philosophy2004-12-16 22:13:59PhilipNeustromno links in headers yet <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Philosophy<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 17: </td> <td> Line 17: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- == ["RevChad" Rev. Chad's] recommended UCD Philosophy Courses ==<br> - <br> - </span> </td> <td> <span>+ == UCD Philosophy Courses ==<br> + === Rev. Chad's recommended courses ===</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 24: </td> <td> Line 23: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- </span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 40: </td> <td> Line 38: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------<br> - == What others have to say ==</span> </td> <td> <span>+ === Other reccomendations ===</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 48: </td> <td> Line 45: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ''I took 189B without ever having taken any other Philosophy course before and it wasn't difficult at all.'' - ["KenjiYamada"] </td> <td> <span>+ </span> ''I took 189B without ever having taken any other Philosophy course before and it wasn't difficult at all.'' - ["KenjiYamada"] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 50: </td> <td> Line 47: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ''I was really looking forward to 189I next quarter, does anyone know why it was cancelled?'' -["AmeliaCarlson" aec] </td> <td> <span>+ </span> ''I was really looking forward to 189I next quarter, does anyone know why it was cancelled?'' -["AmeliaCarlson" aec] </td> </tr> </table> </div> Philosophyhttp://daviswiki.org/Philosophy2004-12-16 21:35:42RevChad <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Philosophy<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 17: </td> <td> Line 17: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> = UCD Philosophy Courses = </td> <td> <span>+</span> =<span>= ["RevChad" Rev. Chad's] recommended</span> UCD Philosophy Courses =<span>=</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 20: </td> <td> Line 20: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- == Lower Division Courses ==<br> - 1. Introduction to Philosophy (4)<br> - Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Problems of philosophy through major writings from various periods. Problems are drawn from political, aesthetic, religious, metaphysical, and epistemological concerns of philosophy. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.—I, II, III. (I, II, III.) King, Cummins, Caston, Wedin</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 24: </td> <td> Line 21: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- 5. Critical Reasoning (4)<br> - Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Criteria of good reasoning in everyday life and in science. Topics to be covered may include basic principles of deduction and induction; fallacies in reasoning; techniques and aids to reasoning; principles of scientific investigation; aids to clarity. Not open to students who have completed course 6. GE credit: Wrt.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ Most classes by Prof. Mattey, who teaches most of the non-analytic and some of the symbolic logic classes, which is an interesting combination. He puts class notes online with hyperlinks and such. Very amusing lecturer, and he uses examples from the news and his family life. In Theory of Knowledge, he started each day with "Philosophy in the news" from that or the previous day.</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 27: </td> <td> Line 23: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- 11. Philosophy East and West (4)<br> - Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Comparative treatment of select theories in Eastern and Western philosophy, e.g., of self, God, being, knowledge, enlightenment. Topics selected from the following philosophies: Eastern—Buddhist, Confucian, Hindu, Taoist; and Western—Platonist, Aristotelian, Medieval Christian, Modern Rationalist/Empiricist, Kantian, Hegelian, Existentialist. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ Prof. Cummins is also an interesting lecturer. Expect not to understand everything from readings since he assigns articles from people deeply imbedded in whatever research and doesn't expect the students to understand everything. Plan to read through and get the basic idea.</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 30: </td> <td> Line 25: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- 12. Introduction to Symbolic Logic (4)<br> - Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Sentence logic syntax and semantics. Truth tables. Transcription between sentence logic and English. Logical equivalence. Validity. Proof techniques.—I. (I.) Teller</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 33: </td> <td> Line 26: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- 13. Minds, Brains, and Computers (4)<br> - Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Contemporary theories of the nature of the mind. The mind as a brain process and as a computer process. Ways in which neuroscience, artificial intelligence and psychology seek to understand the mind. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SciEng or SocSci, Wrt.—Cummins</span> </td> <td> <span>+ 11. Philosophy East and West is generally only taught during the Summer, but has a really funny prof, as long as you are into dark humor. The only other place to get eastern philosophy is "Chinese Philosophy" in the Religious Studies Dept.</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 36: </td> <td> Line 28: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- 14. Ethical and Social Problems in Contemporary Society (4)<br> - Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Philosophical issues and positions involved in contemporary moral and social problems. Possible topics include civil disobedience and revolution, racial and sex discrimination, environment, population control, technology and human values, sexual morality, freedom in society. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt.—Rosati</span> </td> <td> <span>+ If you are good at logic and math, take 12. Intro to Symbolic Logic. If you are a Philosophy major who is not good at math and logic, good luck.</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 39: </td> <td> Line 30: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- 15. Bioethics (4)<br> - Lecture—3 hours; discussion–1 hour. Critical analysis of normative issues raised by contemporary medicine and biology. Possible topics include euthanasia, abortion, reproductive technologies, genetic engineering, practitioner/patient relationships, allocation of medical resources, experimentation on human subjects. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.—Dworkin</span> </td> <td> <span>+ 15. Bioethics is a great course with interesting current topics. Prof. Dworkin is a great lecturer.</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 42: </td> <td> Line 32: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- 21. History of Philosophy: Ancient (4)<br> - Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Survey of Greek philosophy with special attention to the Pre-Socratics, Plato, and Aristotle. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.—Wedin</span> </td> <td> <span>+ 102. Theory of Knowledge amused ["RevChad"] and reinforced his general skepticism.</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 45: </td> <td> Line 34: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- 22N. History of Philosophy: Early Modern (4)<br> - Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Survey of major figures in philosophy of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, with emphasis on Descartes, Hume, and Kant. Not open for credit to students who have completed former course 22 or 23. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.—Cummins, Mattey</span> </td> <td> <span>+ 151. Nineteenth Century European Philosophy is about crazy people and their theories, such as "Idealism in Schopenhauer and Hegel, dialectical materialism in Marx, irrationalism in Kierkegaard, Nietzsche and Dostoevsky." Take it when you can since it is rarely offered.</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 48: </td> <td> Line 36: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- 24. Introduction to Ethics and Political Philosophy (4)<br> - Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Reading of historical and contemporary works highlighting central problems in ethical theory and political philosophy. Why should we be moral? What is moral behavior? What is justice, both for the individual and for society? Is there a right of rebellion? GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.—Väyrynen </span> </td> <td> <span>+ 156. Contemporary Analytic Philosophy is fun and Cummins offers an interesting critique of the Analytic Philosophy you will see so much of.</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 51: </td> <td> Line 38: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- 30. Introduction to Philosophy of Science (4)<br> - Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Basic problems in the philosophy of science, common to the physical, biological, and social sciences. Analysis of explanation, confirmation theory, observational and theoretical terms, the nature of theories, operationalism and behaviorism, realism, reduction. Not open for credit to students who have taken course 104. GE credit: ArtHum or SciEng, Wrt.—Teller</span> </td> <td> <span>+ 157. Twentieth Century European Philosophy ["RevChad"] is signed up for this Winter '05, since Mattey is cool and the philosophers seem crazy enough to be interesting.</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 54: </td> <td> Line 40: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- 31. Appraising Scientific Reasoning (4)<br> - Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Introduction to scientific hypotheses and the kinds of reasoning used to justify such hypotheses. Emphasis on adequate justification, criteria, and strategies for distinguishing scientific from pseudoscientific theories. Concrete historical and contemporary cases. GE credit: ArtHum or SciEng.—Griesemer</span> </td> <td> <span>+ ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------<br> + == What others have to say ==</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 57: </td> <td> Line 43: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- 32. Understanding Scientific Change (4)<br> - Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Concepts of scientific change in historical and philosophical perspective. Survey of models of growth of knowledge, 17th century to present. Relationship between logic of theories and theory choice. Kuhn’s revolution model. Examples from various sciences. GE credit: ArtHum or SciEng, Wrt.—Griesemer<br> - <br> - 38. Introduction to Philosophy of Biology (4)<br> - Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Non-technical introduction to philosophical, social, and scientific ideas, methods and technologies in contemporary biological fields such as evolution, genetics, molecular biology, ecology, behavior. Philosophical consideration of determinism, reductionism, explanation, theory, modeling, observation, experimentation. Evaluation of scientific explanations of human nature. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.—Griesemer, Neander<br> - <br> - 98. Directed Group Study (1-5)<br> - Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (P/NP grading only.)<br> - <br> - 99. Special Study for Undergraduates (1-5)<br> - Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (P/NP grading only.)<br> - <br> - == Upper Division Courses ==<br> - (Certain upper division courses may not be offered every year.)<br> - <br> - 101. Metaphysics (4)<br> - Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy recommended. Theories of being. Such topics as reality, substance, universals, space, time, causality, becoming, body, experience, persons, freedom, and determinism. Views of the nature and method of metaphysics. Anti-metaphysical arguments. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.<br> - <br> - 102. Theory of Knowledge (4)<br> - Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing or discussion. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy. Analysis of the concept of knowledge. The relation between knowledge, belief and truth. Development of foundationalist, coherentist and externalist theories of justified belief. Examination of skepticism. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.—Mattey<br> - <br> - 103. Philosophy of Mind (4)<br> - Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. The relation between mind and body, our knowledge of other minds, and the explanation of mental acts. Discussion of such concepts as action, intention, and causation. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.—Cummins, Neander<br> - <br> - 105. Philosophy of Religion (4)<br> - Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy recommended. Logical, metaphysical, epistemological, and existential aspects of selected religious concepts and problems. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.<br> - <br> - 107. Philosophy of the Physical Sciences (4)<br> - Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: one philosophy course or a science background recommended. Nature of testability and confirmation of scientific hypotheses; nature of scientific laws, theories, explanations, and models. Problems of causality, determininism, induction, and probability; the structure of scientific revolutions. GE credit: ArtHum or SciEng, Wrt.—Teller<br> - <br> - 108. Philosophy of the Biological Sciences (4)<br> - Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: one course in biology or one course in philosophy. Scientific method in biology. Nature of biological theories, explanations, and models. Problems of evolutionary theory, ecology, genetics, and sociobiology. Science and human values. GE credit: ArtHum or SciEng, Wrt.—Griesemer<br> - <br> - 109. Philosophy of the Social Sciences (4)<br> - Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy or a social science recommended. The nature of the social sciences, their subject matter and methods. Similarities to and differences from natural and life sciences. Predicting and explaining human behavior. Behaviorism. Reduction, holism, and individualism. Related moral issues. The social sciences and philosophy. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt.—Neander, Teller<br> - <br> - 111. Philosophy of Space and Time (4)<br> - Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: one upper division philosophy course. Philosophical problems of space and time. The philosophical implications of space-time theories, such as those of Newton and Einstein. Topics may include the nature of geometry, conventionalism, absolutist versus relationist views of space and time, philosophical impact of relativity theory.—Teller<br> - <br> - 112. Intermediate Symbolic Logic (4)<br> - Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 12 or consent of instructor. Predicate logic syntax and semantics. Transcription between predicate logic and English. Proof techniques. Identity, functions, and definite descriptions. Introduction to concepts of metatheory.—II. (II.) Mattey<br> - <br> - 113. Advanced Logic (4)<br> - Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 112 or Mathematics 108 or the equivalent. Topics will vary between metalogic of First-Order logic through the Completeness and Löwenheim-Skolem theorems; and Zermelo-Fraenkel set theory typically axiomatized as a First-Order theory. May be repeated once when subject area differs.<br> - <br> - 114. History of Ethics (4)<br> - Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: one philosophy course. Study of some classic texts from the history of philosophical writing on central problems of ethics, taking the form either of a survey or concentrated examination of selected historical figures. Readings from such philosophers as Aristotle, Butler, Hume, Kant, Mill. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.<br> - <br> - 115. Problems in Normative Ethics (4)<br> - Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy. Moral philosophy studied through examination of moral problems and the moral principles and common sense intuitions that bear on them. Problems discussed may include: animal rights, fetal rights, euthanasia, justice and health care, war, nuclear deterrence, world hunger, environmental protection. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.<br> - <br> - 116. Ethical Theories (4)<br> - Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy; one course in ethics recommended. Study of fundamental concepts and problems in ethical theory through an examination of classical and contemporary philosophical theories of ethics. Among the theories that may be discussed are utilitarianism, virtue theory, theories of natural <br> - rights, Kantian ethical theory, and contractarianism.—Väyrynen <br> - <br> - 117. Foundations of Ethics (4)<br> - Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: one of courses 114, 115, 116, 101, or 137. Advanced investigation of questions about the nature and foundations of morality. Among the topics that may be discussed are moral realism and anti-realism, cognitivism and non-cognitivism, types of relativism, moral skepticism, normative language and normative belief.—Rosati<br> - <br> - 118. Political Philosophy (4)<br> - Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy. Intensive examination of some central concepts of political thought such as the state, sovereignty, rights, obligation, freedom, law, authority, and responsibility. GE credit: SocSci, Div, Wrt.—Rosati<br> - <br> - 119. Philosophy of Law (4)<br> - Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy or consent of instructor. Philosophical theories of the nature of law, legal obligation, the relation of law and morals. Problems for law involving liberty and justice: freedom of expression, privacy, rights, discrimination and fairness, responsibility, and punishment. GE credit: SocSci, Div, Wrt.—Rosati<br> - <br> - ''Take this class.'' -["AmeliaCarlson" aec]<br> - <br> - 123. Aesthetics (4)<br> - Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy recommended. Nature of art, of artistic creation, of the work of art, and of aesthetic experience; nature and validity of criticism; relations of art to its environment. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.—Wilson<br> - <br> - 125. Theory of Action (4)<br> - Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing or discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: one course in Philosophy. Survey of prominent contemporary approaches to leading problems in action theory. Problems include issues about the nature of intentional action and the conceptual character of explanations of actions in terms of the agent’s reasons. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.—Wilson<br> - <br> - 127. Film Theory (4)<br> - Lecture/discussion—3 hours; film viewing—3 hours. Prerequisite: Film Studies 1 or consent of instructor. Survey of the conceptual frameworks used to study film (including semiotics, psychoanalysis, spectatorship, auteur, genre and narrative theories). Historical survey of major film theorists. (Same course as Film Studies 127.) GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.—Wilson<br> - <br> - 128. Rationality (4)<br> - Lecture/discussion—3 hours; extensive writing. Prerequisite: at least one course in philosophy. Philosophical issues concerning rationality in its various forms. Focus is on theoretical and practical reasoning and conditions for rational belief, choice, and action. Possible additional topics include rationality and human limitations; paradoxes of rationality; varieties of irrationality; rationality and objectivity.—Väyrynen<br> - <br> - 131. Philosophy of Logic and Mathematics (4)<br> - Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 12 or one course for credit in mathematics. Nature of formal systems and mathematical theories. Selected topics include logical and semantical paradoxes; foundations of mathematics; set theory, type theory, and intuitionistic theory; philosophy of geometry; philosophical implications of Gödel’s incompleteness results.<br> - <br> - 134. Modal Logic (4)<br> - Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 112 or Mathematics 108 or the equivalent. Survey of the main systems of modal logic, including Lewis systems S4 and S5. “Possible worlds” semantics and formal proofs. Applications to epistemology, ethics, or temporality.—King, Mattey<br> - <br> - 135. Alternative Logics (4)<br> - Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 12, Mathematics 108, or the equivalent. Alternatives to standard truth-functional logic, including many-valued logics, intuitionist logics, relevance logics, and non-monotonic logics.—Mattey<br> - <br> - 137. Philosophy of Language (4)<br> - Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy or linguistics. Discussion of philosophical theories of how languages work and philosophical problems arising from thinking about language. Emphasis on modern (1879–present) philosophical views on language.—Wilson, King<br> - <br> - 143. Hellenistic and Neo-Platonic Philosophy (4)<br> - Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 21. Greek philosophy after Aristotle, including Epicureanism, Stoicism, Skepticism and Neo-Platonism. GE: ArtHum, Wrt.—Caston<br> - <br> - 145. Medieval Philosophy (4)<br> - Lecture/discussion—3 hours; written reports. Prerequisite: course 21. Study of major philosophers in the medieval period. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.—Caston<br> - <br> - 151. Nineteenth Century European Philosophy (4)<br> - Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 22N. Survey of the main movements in nineteenth century philosophy on the European continent. Idealism in Schopenhauer and Hegel, dialectical materialism in Marx, irrationalism in Kierkegaard, Nietzsche and Dostoevsky. Not offered every year. GE credit; ArtHum.—Mattey<br> - <br> - 156. Contemporary Analytic Philosophy (4)<br> - Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy. Consideration of central issues such as meaning/reference, analytic/<br> - synthetic, reductionism, formal and ordinary language, essential properties, ontological commitment, possible world semantics; influential works by philosophers such as Russell, Moore, Wittgenstein, Austin, Carnap, Quine, Putnam, Kripke, van Fraassen.—King, Cummins<br> - <br> - 157. Twentieth Century European Philosophy (4)<br> - Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: one course in Philosophy. Survey of the main movements in twentieth century philosophy on the European continent, including phenomenology, existentialism, structuralism and post-modernism. Philosophers covered include Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, Levi-Strauss, Foucault. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.—Mattey<br> - <br> - 160. Pre-Socratics (4)<br> - Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 21. Study of the metaphysical views of such pre-Socratic figures as the Milesians, the Pythagoreans, Heracleitus, Parmenides, Empedocles, Anaxagoras, and the atomists.—Wedin<br> - <br> - 161. Plato (4)<br> - Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 21. Examines Plato’s most important contributions in metaphysics, epistemology, psychology, cosmology, ethics and political philosophy. Dialogues will be selected from Plato’s middle and later writings. Offered in alternate years.—Wedin, Caston<br> - <br> - 162. Aristotle (4)<br> - Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 21. An overview of Aristotle’s most central and influential writings. Topics selected from fields such as metaphysics, physics, ethics, logic, and psychology. Offered in alternate years.—Wedin, Caston<br> - <br> - 168. Descartes (4)<br> - Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 22N. The philosophical writings of Renè Descartes. Topics include the refutation of skepticism, the nature and existence of mind and body, the existence of God, and the foundations of science. Not offered every year.—Mattey<br> - <br> - 170. Leibniz (4)<br> - Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 22N. Survey of the philosophical writings of Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz. Topics include Leibniz’s logic, the existence of God, human freedom, substance, and the relation between science and metaphysics. Not offered every year.—Mattey<br> - <br> - 172. Locke and Berkeley (4)<br> - Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 22N. Principal metaphysical works of John Locke and George Berkeley. Topics include abstract ideas, existence of matter, primary and secondary qualities, essence, substance, the existence of God, and the nature of scientific knowledge. May be repeated for credit. Not offered every year.—Cummins<br> - <br> - 174. Hume (4)<br> - Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 22N. David Hume’s Treatise of Human Nature and related writings. Topics include empiricism, space, causality, belief, skepticism, the passions, and morality. Not offered every year.—Mattey<br> - <br> - 175. Kant (4)<br> - Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 22N. Immanuel Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason and related writings. Topics include the nature of human cognition, space and time, a priori concepts, substance, causality, human freedom, and the existence of God. Not offered every year.—Mattey</span> </td> <td> <span>+ 119. Philosophy of Law ''Take this class.'' -["AmeliaCarlson" aec]</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 193: </td> <td> Line 51: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- <br> - 194HA-194HB. Honors Research Project (4-4)<br> - Tutoring—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: consent of instructor; open to students who are members of the honors program in Philosophy. Completion of honors research project under direction of an instructor. Consult departmental major adviser for list of instructors available in a given quarter.<br> - <br> - 198. Directed Group Study (1-5)<br> - (P/NP grading only.)<br> - <br> - 199. Special Study for Advanced Undergraduates (1-5)<br> - Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (P/NP grading only.)<br> - <br> - == Graduate Courses ==<br> - 201. Metaphysics (4)<br> - Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Topics vary from quarter to quarter and may include the following: What are things? Do names refer to things? If so, how? Do things have essential properties? What is the nature of necessity? May be repeated for credit when topic differs and with consent of instructor.<br> - <br> - 202. Theory of Knowledge (4)<br> - Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: graduate standing in philosophy or consent of instructor. Topics vary from quarter to quarter. Sample topics include belief, skepticism, justification, externalism, naturalized epistemology. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.—Mattey<br> - <br> - 203. Philosophy of Mind (4)<br> - Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Topics in the philosophy of mind such as the mind-body problem, mental representation, consciousness, intentionality. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.—Cummins<br> - <br> - 203P. Philosophy of Mind Practicum (4)<br> - Practicum—12 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Specific research conducted and prepared for publication by advanced students in a team setting. Topics include knowledge representation and learning in neural networks, the nature and formal properties of mental representation. May be repeated for credit when topic differs and with consent of instructor. (S/U grading only.)—Cummins<br> - <br> - 207. Philosophy of Physics (4)<br> - Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: graduate standing in Philosophy or consent of instructor. Intensive treatment of one (or more) topic(s) in the philosophy of physics, such as foundations of spacetime theories, the interpretation of quantum mechanics, or foundations of statistical mechanics. May be repeated for credit when topic differs and with consent of instructor.—Teller<br> - <br> - 208. Philosophy of Biology (4)<br> - Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Intensive treatment of one (or more) topic(s) in the philosophy of biology, such as foundations of evolutionary theories, reductionism in biology, sociobiology and cultural evolution. May be repeated for credit when topic differs and with consent of instructor.—Griesemer<br> - <br> - 210. Philosophy of Science (4)<br> - Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Treatment of one or more general topics of current interest in philosophy of science. Topics may include scientific explanation, theories of confirmation, scientific realism, reduction in physics and biology. May be repeated for credit when topic differs and with consent of instructor.—Teller<br> - <br> - 212. Philosophy of Logic and Mathematics (4)<br> - Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 112 or 113 or Mathematics 108 or 125 or the equivalent. Philosophical issues in logic and math. Topics may include nature of logical and mathematical truth or knowledge, correctness of logical systems, foundations of mathematics, metaphysical and epistemological presuppositions, applications to philosophical problems and formalization of philosophical theories. May be repeated for credit when topic differs and with consent of instructor.—King<br> - <br> - 214. Ethics (4)<br> - Seminar—3 hours; term paper Prerequisite: graduate standing in philosophy or consent of instructor. Topics may include morality and motivation, objectivity in ethics, the relationship between the factual and the moral. Topics vary from quarter to quarter. May be repeated for credit when topic differs and with consent of instructor.—Dworkin, Rosati, Väyrynen<br> - <br> - 217. Political Philosophy (4)<br> - Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Advanced studies in political philosophy. Topics vary but may include distributive justice, enforcement of morality by the state, equality, obligation to obey the law, social contract theory. May be repeated for credit when topic differs and with consent of instructor.—Dworkin<br> - <br> - 237. Philosophy of Language (4)<br> - Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Study of philosophical issues raised by language, such as the nature of semantic content, proper semantics for verbs of propositional attitude, feasibility and limitations of formal semantics and pragmatics for natural languages. May be repeated for credit when topic differs and with consent of instructor.—King<br> - <br> - 261. Plato (4)<br> - Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite; graduate standing or consent of instructor. Advanced seminar designed for analysis of arguments, doctrines, and texts from Plato’s works. Methods of argumentation and interpretation are especially stressed. Topics vary according to instructor. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.—Wedin, Caston<br> - <br> - 262. Aristotle (4)<br> - Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Advanced seminar designed for analysis of arguments, doctrines, and texts from Aristotle’s works. Methods of argumentation and interpretation are especially stressed. Topics vary according to instructor. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.—Wedin, Caston<br> - <br> - 275. Kant (4)<br> - Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: graduate standing in philosophy or consent of instructor. Intensive study of a topic in the philosophy of Kant, in such areas as metaphysics, theory of knowledge, ethics. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.—Mattey<br> - <br> - 290. History of Philosophy (4)<br> - Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Topics in the history of philosophy. Topics vary according to instructor from quarter to quarter. May be repeated for credit when topic differs and with consent of instructor.—Wedin, Mattey, Wilson<br> - <br> - 298. Group Study (1-5)<br> - <br> - 299. Research (1-12)<br> - (S/U grading only.)<br> - <br> - <br> - ----<br> - ''I noticed that this is basically just the general catalog summarized. Maybe a link to the catalog online and then actual commentary would be more useful to people? I don't think anyone is helped by reading a replica of the G.C.?'' -["PhilipNeustrom"]</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Philosophyhttp://daviswiki.org/Philosophy2004-12-16 14:49:53PhilipNeustromquestion to philo students/people who made this page <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Philosophy<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 253: </td> <td> Line 253: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + <br> + ----<br> + ''I noticed that this is basically just the general catalog summarized. Maybe a link to the catalog online and then actual commentary would be more useful to people? I don't think anyone is helped by reading a replica of the G.C.?'' -["PhilipNeustrom"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Philosophyhttp://daviswiki.org/Philosophy2004-12-16 12:39:17RevChadnon-analytic classes <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Philosophy<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 14: </td> <td> Line 14: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> UC Davis's Philosophy department is composed <span>on</span>ly of [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Analytic_philosophy Analytic philosophers] <span>(as of Fall</span> 200<span>4</span>). </td> <td> <span>+</span> UC Davis's Philosophy department is composed <span>most</span>ly of [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Analytic_philosophy Analytic philosophers] <span>though there are such classes as 19th Century and 20th Century Philosophy, and Winter</span> 200<span>5 has a Religious Existentialism class (198A</span>). </td> </tr> </table> </div> Philosophyhttp://daviswiki.org/Philosophy2004-12-16 12:15:38AmeliaCarlsoncomment/question about 189I <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Philosophy<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 121: </td> <td> Line 121: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ''Take this class.'' -["AmeliaCarlson" aec]<br> + </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 190: </td> <td> Line 192: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ''I was really looking forward to 189I next quarter, does anyone know why it was cancelled?'' -["AmeliaCarlson" aec]<br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Philosophyhttp://daviswiki.org/Philosophy2004-12-16 12:02:13KenjiYamadacomment <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Philosophy<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 188: </td> <td> Line 188: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ''I took 189B without ever having taken any other Philosophy course before and it wasn't difficult at all.'' - ["KenjiYamada"]<br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Philosophyhttp://daviswiki.org/Philosophy2004-12-16 11:15:30AmeliaCarlsonis this unnecessary info? <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Philosophy<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 15: </td> <td> Line 15: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + <br> + = UCD Philosophy Courses =<br> + <br> + <br> + == Lower Division Courses ==<br> + 1. Introduction to Philosophy (4)<br> + Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Problems of philosophy through major writings from various periods. Problems are drawn from political, aesthetic, religious, metaphysical, and epistemological concerns of philosophy. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.—I, II, III. (I, II, III.) King, Cummins, Caston, Wedin<br> + <br> + 5. Critical Reasoning (4)<br> + Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Criteria of good reasoning in everyday life and in science. Topics to be covered may include basic principles of deduction and induction; fallacies in reasoning; techniques and aids to reasoning; principles of scientific investigation; aids to clarity. Not open to students who have completed course 6. GE credit: Wrt.<br> + <br> + 11. Philosophy East and West (4)<br> + Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Comparative treatment of select theories in Eastern and Western philosophy, e.g., of self, God, being, knowledge, enlightenment. Topics selected from the following philosophies: Eastern—Buddhist, Confucian, Hindu, Taoist; and Western—Platonist, Aristotelian, Medieval Christian, Modern Rationalist/Empiricist, Kantian, Hegelian, Existentialist. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt.<br> + <br> + 12. Introduction to Symbolic Logic (4)<br> + Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Sentence logic syntax and semantics. Truth tables. Transcription between sentence logic and English. Logical equivalence. Validity. Proof techniques.—I. (I.) Teller<br> + <br> + 13. Minds, Brains, and Computers (4)<br> + Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Contemporary theories of the nature of the mind. The mind as a brain process and as a computer process. Ways in which neuroscience, artificial intelligence and psychology seek to understand the mind. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SciEng or SocSci, Wrt.—Cummins<br> + <br> + 14. Ethical and Social Problems in Contemporary Society (4)<br> + Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Philosophical issues and positions involved in contemporary moral and social problems. Possible topics include civil disobedience and revolution, racial and sex discrimination, environment, population control, technology and human values, sexual morality, freedom in society. GE credit: ArtHum, Div, Wrt.—Rosati<br> + <br> + 15. Bioethics (4)<br> + Lecture—3 hours; discussion–1 hour. Critical analysis of normative issues raised by contemporary medicine and biology. Possible topics include euthanasia, abortion, reproductive technologies, genetic engineering, practitioner/patient relationships, allocation of medical resources, experimentation on human subjects. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.—Dworkin<br> + <br> + 21. History of Philosophy: Ancient (4)<br> + Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Survey of Greek philosophy with special attention to the Pre-Socratics, Plato, and Aristotle. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.—Wedin<br> + <br> + 22N. History of Philosophy: Early Modern (4)<br> + Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Survey of major figures in philosophy of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, with emphasis on Descartes, Hume, and Kant. Not open for credit to students who have completed former course 22 or 23. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.—Cummins, Mattey<br> + <br> + 24. Introduction to Ethics and Political Philosophy (4)<br> + Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Reading of historical and contemporary works highlighting central problems in ethical theory and political philosophy. Why should we be moral? What is moral behavior? What is justice, both for the individual and for society? Is there a right of rebellion? GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.—Väyrynen <br> + <br> + 30. Introduction to Philosophy of Science (4)<br> + Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Basic problems in the philosophy of science, common to the physical, biological, and social sciences. Analysis of explanation, confirmation theory, observational and theoretical terms, the nature of theories, operationalism and behaviorism, realism, reduction. Not open for credit to students who have taken course 104. GE credit: ArtHum or SciEng, Wrt.—Teller<br> + <br> + 31. Appraising Scientific Reasoning (4)<br> + Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Introduction to scientific hypotheses and the kinds of reasoning used to justify such hypotheses. Emphasis on adequate justification, criteria, and strategies for distinguishing scientific from pseudoscientific theories. Concrete historical and contemporary cases. GE credit: ArtHum or SciEng.—Griesemer<br> + <br> + 32. Understanding Scientific Change (4)<br> + Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Concepts of scientific change in historical and philosophical perspective. Survey of models of growth of knowledge, 17th century to present. Relationship between logic of theories and theory choice. Kuhn’s revolution model. Examples from various sciences. GE credit: ArtHum or SciEng, Wrt.—Griesemer<br> + <br> + 38. Introduction to Philosophy of Biology (4)<br> + Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Non-technical introduction to philosophical, social, and scientific ideas, methods and technologies in contemporary biological fields such as evolution, genetics, molecular biology, ecology, behavior. Philosophical consideration of determinism, reductionism, explanation, theory, modeling, observation, experimentation. Evaluation of scientific explanations of human nature. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.—Griesemer, Neander<br> + <br> + 98. Directed Group Study (1-5)<br> + Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (P/NP grading only.)<br> + <br> + 99. Special Study for Undergraduates (1-5)<br> + Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (P/NP grading only.)<br> + <br> + == Upper Division Courses ==<br> + (Certain upper division courses may not be offered every year.)<br> + <br> + 101. Metaphysics (4)<br> + Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy recommended. Theories of being. Such topics as reality, substance, universals, space, time, causality, becoming, body, experience, persons, freedom, and determinism. Views of the nature and method of metaphysics. Anti-metaphysical arguments. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.<br> + <br> + 102. Theory of Knowledge (4)<br> + Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing or discussion. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy. Analysis of the concept of knowledge. The relation between knowledge, belief and truth. Development of foundationalist, coherentist and externalist theories of justified belief. Examination of skepticism. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.—Mattey<br> + <br> + 103. Philosophy of Mind (4)<br> + Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. The relation between mind and body, our knowledge of other minds, and the explanation of mental acts. Discussion of such concepts as action, intention, and causation. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.—Cummins, Neander<br> + <br> + 105. Philosophy of Religion (4)<br> + Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy recommended. Logical, metaphysical, epistemological, and existential aspects of selected religious concepts and problems. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.<br> + <br> + 107. Philosophy of the Physical Sciences (4)<br> + Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: one philosophy course or a science background recommended. Nature of testability and confirmation of scientific hypotheses; nature of scientific laws, theories, explanations, and models. Problems of causality, determininism, induction, and probability; the structure of scientific revolutions. GE credit: ArtHum or SciEng, Wrt.—Teller<br> + <br> + 108. Philosophy of the Biological Sciences (4)<br> + Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: one course in biology or one course in philosophy. Scientific method in biology. Nature of biological theories, explanations, and models. Problems of evolutionary theory, ecology, genetics, and sociobiology. Science and human values. GE credit: ArtHum or SciEng, Wrt.—Griesemer<br> + <br> + 109. Philosophy of the Social Sciences (4)<br> + Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy or a social science recommended. The nature of the social sciences, their subject matter and methods. Similarities to and differences from natural and life sciences. Predicting and explaining human behavior. Behaviorism. Reduction, holism, and individualism. Related moral issues. The social sciences and philosophy. GE credit: ArtHum or SocSci, Wrt.—Neander, Teller<br> + <br> + 111. Philosophy of Space and Time (4)<br> + Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: one upper division philosophy course. Philosophical problems of space and time. The philosophical implications of space-time theories, such as those of Newton and Einstein. Topics may include the nature of geometry, conventionalism, absolutist versus relationist views of space and time, philosophical impact of relativity theory.—Teller<br> + <br> + 112. Intermediate Symbolic Logic (4)<br> + Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 12 or consent of instructor. Predicate logic syntax and semantics. Transcription between predicate logic and English. Proof techniques. Identity, functions, and definite descriptions. Introduction to concepts of metatheory.—II. (II.) Mattey<br> + <br> + 113. Advanced Logic (4)<br> + Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 112 or Mathematics 108 or the equivalent. Topics will vary between metalogic of First-Order logic through the Completeness and Löwenheim-Skolem theorems; and Zermelo-Fraenkel set theory typically axiomatized as a First-Order theory. May be repeated once when subject area differs.<br> + <br> + 114. History of Ethics (4)<br> + Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: one philosophy course. Study of some classic texts from the history of philosophical writing on central problems of ethics, taking the form either of a survey or concentrated examination of selected historical figures. Readings from such philosophers as Aristotle, Butler, Hume, Kant, Mill. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.<br> + <br> + 115. Problems in Normative Ethics (4)<br> + Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy. Moral philosophy studied through examination of moral problems and the moral principles and common sense intuitions that bear on them. Problems discussed may include: animal rights, fetal rights, euthanasia, justice and health care, war, nuclear deterrence, world hunger, environmental protection. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.<br> + <br> + 116. Ethical Theories (4)<br> + Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy; one course in ethics recommended. Study of fundamental concepts and problems in ethical theory through an examination of classical and contemporary philosophical theories of ethics. Among the theories that may be discussed are utilitarianism, virtue theory, theories of natural <br> + rights, Kantian ethical theory, and contractarianism.—Väyrynen <br> + <br> + 117. Foundations of Ethics (4)<br> + Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: one of courses 114, 115, 116, 101, or 137. Advanced investigation of questions about the nature and foundations of morality. Among the topics that may be discussed are moral realism and anti-realism, cognitivism and non-cognitivism, types of relativism, moral skepticism, normative language and normative belief.—Rosati<br> + <br> + 118. Political Philosophy (4)<br> + Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy. Intensive examination of some central concepts of political thought such as the state, sovereignty, rights, obligation, freedom, law, authority, and responsibility. GE credit: SocSci, Div, Wrt.—Rosati<br> + <br> + 119. Philosophy of Law (4)<br> + Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy or consent of instructor. Philosophical theories of the nature of law, legal obligation, the relation of law and morals. Problems for law involving liberty and justice: freedom of expression, privacy, rights, discrimination and fairness, responsibility, and punishment. GE credit: SocSci, Div, Wrt.—Rosati<br> + <br> + 123. Aesthetics (4)<br> + Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy recommended. Nature of art, of artistic creation, of the work of art, and of aesthetic experience; nature and validity of criticism; relations of art to its environment. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.—Wilson<br> + <br> + 125. Theory of Action (4)<br> + Lecture—3 hours; extensive writing or discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: one course in Philosophy. Survey of prominent contemporary approaches to leading problems in action theory. Problems include issues about the nature of intentional action and the conceptual character of explanations of actions in terms of the agent’s reasons. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.—Wilson<br> + <br> + 127. Film Theory (4)<br> + Lecture/discussion—3 hours; film viewing—3 hours. Prerequisite: Film Studies 1 or consent of instructor. Survey of the conceptual frameworks used to study film (including semiotics, psychoanalysis, spectatorship, auteur, genre and narrative theories). Historical survey of major film theorists. (Same course as Film Studies 127.) GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.—Wilson<br> + <br> + 128. Rationality (4)<br> + Lecture/discussion—3 hours; extensive writing. Prerequisite: at least one course in philosophy. Philosophical issues concerning rationality in its various forms. Focus is on theoretical and practical reasoning and conditions for rational belief, choice, and action. Possible additional topics include rationality and human limitations; paradoxes of rationality; varieties of irrationality; rationality and objectivity.—Väyrynen<br> + <br> + 131. Philosophy of Logic and Mathematics (4)<br> + Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 12 or one course for credit in mathematics. Nature of formal systems and mathematical theories. Selected topics include logical and semantical paradoxes; foundations of mathematics; set theory, type theory, and intuitionistic theory; philosophy of geometry; philosophical implications of Gödel’s incompleteness results.<br> + <br> + 134. Modal Logic (4)<br> + Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 112 or Mathematics 108 or the equivalent. Survey of the main systems of modal logic, including Lewis systems S4 and S5. “Possible worlds” semantics and formal proofs. Applications to epistemology, ethics, or temporality.—King, Mattey<br> + <br> + 135. Alternative Logics (4)<br> + Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 12, Mathematics 108, or the equivalent. Alternatives to standard truth-functional logic, including many-valued logics, intuitionist logics, relevance logics, and non-monotonic logics.—Mattey<br> + <br> + 137. Philosophy of Language (4)<br> + Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy or linguistics. Discussion of philosophical theories of how languages work and philosophical problems arising from thinking about language. Emphasis on modern (1879–present) philosophical views on language.—Wilson, King<br> + <br> + 143. Hellenistic and Neo-Platonic Philosophy (4)<br> + Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 21. Greek philosophy after Aristotle, including Epicureanism, Stoicism, Skepticism and Neo-Platonism. GE: ArtHum, Wrt.—Caston<br> + <br> + 145. Medieval Philosophy (4)<br> + Lecture/discussion—3 hours; written reports. Prerequisite: course 21. Study of major philosophers in the medieval period. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.—Caston<br> + <br> + 151. Nineteenth Century European Philosophy (4)<br> + Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 22N. Survey of the main movements in nineteenth century philosophy on the European continent. Idealism in Schopenhauer and Hegel, dialectical materialism in Marx, irrationalism in Kierkegaard, Nietzsche and Dostoevsky. Not offered every year. GE credit; ArtHum.—Mattey<br> + <br> + 156. Contemporary Analytic Philosophy (4)<br> + Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy. Consideration of central issues such as meaning/reference, analytic/<br> + synthetic, reductionism, formal and ordinary language, essential properties, ontological commitment, possible world semantics; influential works by philosophers such as Russell, Moore, Wittgenstein, Austin, Carnap, Quine, Putnam, Kripke, van Fraassen.—King, Cummins<br> + <br> + 157. Twentieth Century European Philosophy (4)<br> + Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: one course in Philosophy. Survey of the main movements in twentieth century philosophy on the European continent, including phenomenology, existentialism, structuralism and post-modernism. Philosophers covered include Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, Levi-Strauss, Foucault. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: ArtHum, Wrt.—Mattey<br> + <br> + 160. Pre-Socratics (4)<br> + Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 21. Study of the metaphysical views of such pre-Socratic figures as the Milesians, the Pythagoreans, Heracleitus, Parmenides, Empedocles, Anaxagoras, and the atomists.—Wedin<br> + <br> + 161. Plato (4)<br> + Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 21. Examines Plato’s most important contributions in metaphysics, epistemology, psychology, cosmology, ethics and political philosophy. Dialogues will be selected from Plato’s middle and later writings. Offered in alternate years.—Wedin, Caston<br> + <br> + 162. Aristotle (4)<br> + Lecture/discussion—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 21. An overview of Aristotle’s most central and influential writings. Topics selected from fields such as metaphysics, physics, ethics, logic, and psychology. Offered in alternate years.—Wedin, Caston<br> + <br> + 168. Descartes (4)<br> + Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 22N. The philosophical writings of Renè Descartes. Topics include the refutation of skepticism, the nature and existence of mind and body, the existence of God, and the foundations of science. Not offered every year.—Mattey<br> + <br> + 170. Leibniz (4)<br> + Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 22N. Survey of the philosophical writings of Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz. Topics include Leibniz’s logic, the existence of God, human freedom, substance, and the relation between science and metaphysics. Not offered every year.—Mattey<br> + <br> + 172. Locke and Berkeley (4)<br> + Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 22N. Principal metaphysical works of John Locke and George Berkeley. Topics include abstract ideas, existence of matter, primary and secondary qualities, essence, substance, the existence of God, and the nature of scientific knowledge. May be repeated for credit. Not offered every year.—Cummins<br> + <br> + 174. Hume (4)<br> + Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 22N. David Hume’s Treatise of Human Nature and related writings. Topics include empiricism, space, causality, belief, skepticism, the passions, and morality. Not offered every year.—Mattey<br> + <br> + 175. Kant (4)<br> + Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 22N. Immanuel Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason and related writings. Topics include the nature of human cognition, space and time, a priori concepts, substance, causality, human freedom, and the existence of God. Not offered every year.—Mattey<br> + <br> + 189A-K. Special Topics in Philosophy (4)<br> + Lecture/discussion—3 hours; extensive writing. Prerequisite: one course in the area of the special topic. Special topics in (A) History of Philosophy, (B) Metaphysics, (C) Theory of Knowledge, (D) Ethics, (E) Political Philosophy, (F) Philosophy of Law, (G) Aesthetics, (H) Philosophy of Mind, (I) Philosophy of Science, (J) Philosophy of Language, (K) Logic. May be repeated up to 8 units of credit. Not offered every year.<br> + <br> + 194HA-194HB. Honors Research Project (4-4)<br> + Tutoring—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: consent of instructor; open to students who are members of the honors program in Philosophy. Completion of honors research project under direction of an instructor. Consult departmental major adviser for list of instructors available in a given quarter.<br> + <br> + 198. Directed Group Study (1-5)<br> + (P/NP grading only.)<br> + <br> + 199. Special Study for Advanced Undergraduates (1-5)<br> + Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (P/NP grading only.)<br> + <br> + == Graduate Courses ==<br> + 201. Metaphysics (4)<br> + Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Topics vary from quarter to quarter and may include the following: What are things? Do names refer to things? If so, how? Do things have essential properties? What is the nature of necessity? May be repeated for credit when topic differs and with consent of instructor.<br> + <br> + 202. Theory of Knowledge (4)<br> + Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: graduate standing in philosophy or consent of instructor. Topics vary from quarter to quarter. Sample topics include belief, skepticism, justification, externalism, naturalized epistemology. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.—Mattey<br> + <br> + 203. Philosophy of Mind (4)<br> + Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Topics in the philosophy of mind such as the mind-body problem, mental representation, consciousness, intentionality. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.—Cummins<br> + <br> + 203P. Philosophy of Mind Practicum (4)<br> + Practicum—12 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Specific research conducted and prepared for publication by advanced students in a team setting. Topics include knowledge representation and learning in neural networks, the nature and formal properties of mental representation. May be repeated for credit when topic differs and with consent of instructor. (S/U grading only.)—Cummins<br> + <br> + 207. Philosophy of Physics (4)<br> + Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: graduate standing in Philosophy or consent of instructor. Intensive treatment of one (or more) topic(s) in the philosophy of physics, such as foundations of spacetime theories, the interpretation of quantum mechanics, or foundations of statistical mechanics. May be repeated for credit when topic differs and with consent of instructor.—Teller<br> + <br> + 208. Philosophy of Biology (4)<br> + Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Intensive treatment of one (or more) topic(s) in the philosophy of biology, such as foundations of evolutionary theories, reductionism in biology, sociobiology and cultural evolution. May be repeated for credit when topic differs and with consent of instructor.—Griesemer<br> + <br> + 210. Philosophy of Science (4)<br> + Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Treatment of one or more general topics of current interest in philosophy of science. Topics may include scientific explanation, theories of confirmation, scientific realism, reduction in physics and biology. May be repeated for credit when topic differs and with consent of instructor.—Teller<br> + <br> + 212. Philosophy of Logic and Mathematics (4)<br> + Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: course 112 or 113 or Mathematics 108 or 125 or the equivalent. Philosophical issues in logic and math. Topics may include nature of logical and mathematical truth or knowledge, correctness of logical systems, foundations of mathematics, metaphysical and epistemological presuppositions, applications to philosophical problems and formalization of philosophical theories. May be repeated for credit when topic differs and with consent of instructor.—King<br> + <br> + 214. Ethics (4)<br> + Seminar—3 hours; term paper Prerequisite: graduate standing in philosophy or consent of instructor. Topics may include morality and motivation, objectivity in ethics, the relationship between the factual and the moral. Topics vary from quarter to quarter. May be repeated for credit when topic differs and with consent of instructor.—Dworkin, Rosati, Väyrynen<br> + <br> + 217. Political Philosophy (4)<br> + Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Advanced studies in political philosophy. Topics vary but may include distributive justice, enforcement of morality by the state, equality, obligation to obey the law, social contract theory. May be repeated for credit when topic differs and with consent of instructor.—Dworkin<br> + <br> + 237. Philosophy of Language (4)<br> + Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Study of philosophical issues raised by language, such as the nature of semantic content, proper semantics for verbs of propositional attitude, feasibility and limitations of formal semantics and pragmatics for natural languages. May be repeated for credit when topic differs and with consent of instructor.—King<br> + <br> + 261. Plato (4)<br> + Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite; graduate standing or consent of instructor. Advanced seminar designed for analysis of arguments, doctrines, and texts from Plato’s works. Methods of argumentation and interpretation are especially stressed. Topics vary according to instructor. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.—Wedin, Caston<br> + <br> + 262. Aristotle (4)<br> + Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Advanced seminar designed for analysis of arguments, doctrines, and texts from Aristotle’s works. Methods of argumentation and interpretation are especially stressed. Topics vary according to instructor. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.—Wedin, Caston<br> + <br> + 275. Kant (4)<br> + Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: graduate standing in philosophy or consent of instructor. Intensive study of a topic in the philosophy of Kant, in such areas as metaphysics, theory of knowledge, ethics. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.—Mattey<br> + <br> + 290. History of Philosophy (4)<br> + Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Topics in the history of philosophy. Topics vary according to instructor from quarter to quarter. May be repeated for credit when topic differs and with consent of instructor.—Wedin, Mattey, Wilson<br> + <br> + 298. Group Study (1-5)<br> + <br> + 299. Research (1-12)<br> + (S/U grading only.)</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Philosophyhttp://daviswiki.org/Philosophy2004-12-10 18:13:11PhilipNeustromnote on type of philosophy practiced <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Philosophy<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 13: </td> <td> Line 13: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + UC Davis's Philosophy department is composed only of [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Analytic_philosophy Analytic philosophers] (as of Fall 2004).</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Philosophyhttp://daviswiki.org/Philosophy2004-12-10 16:57:08AmeliaCarlson <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Philosophy<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ||&lt;bgcolor='#E0E0FF'&gt;'''Location'''||<br> + ||1328 Social Sciences &amp; Humanities (aka the ["Death Star"])||<br> + ||&lt;bgcolor='#E0E0FF'&gt;'''Hours'''||<br> + || ||<br> + ||&lt;bgcolor='#E0E0FF'&gt;'''Phone'''||<br> + ||phone (530)752-0607||<br> + ||fax (530)752-8964||<br> + ||&lt;bgcolor='#E0E0FF'&gt;'''Website'''||<br> + ||[http://www-philosophy.ucdavis.edu/]||<br> + <br> + <br> + One of the many majors at ["Campus" UC Davis] is philosophy. Many rude things have been said by and about philosophers.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div>