Summer in Davis

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==Daytime Wet Tower==
You can also use a wet towel during the day. Wet a towel and wrap yourself with it. The cooling effect is actually quite decent if you are stuck without air conditioning.

Like it or not, Davis is essentially a company town, that company being UC Davis. With the end of spring comes the end of the quarter, finals and graduation wrapping up, the town undergoes some changes because many students leave town for the season. They return in fall along with a new crop of freshmen.

  1. Pros and Cons
    1. Pros
    2. Cons
    3. Pros or Cons, depending on how you look at them
  2. Tips for Surviving the Oppressive Heat
    1. Summer-proof Your Windows
    2. Ice-Water Humidifier
    3. Fan Chain
    4. Apartment Hunting: Choose Wisely
    5. Bicycle Air Conditioning
    6. Schedule Your Day Around the Sun
    7. Cool Shower before Sleeping
    8. Kiddie Pool!!
    9. Homebrew A/C
    10. Don't Waste the Cool Times of Day
    11. Exercise at Cooler Hours, in Shady Places
    12. Freeze Your Clothes
    13. Drink Cold Fluids
    14. Sleeping Cooler
    15. Daytime Wet Tower
    16. Summer Session Classes are Air-Conditioned
  3. Resources

Pros and Cons

What are the pros and cons about Davis during the Summer?

Pros

Cons

Pros or Cons, depending on how you look at them

Tips for Surviving the Oppressive Heat

The hot weather combined with the empty town can be troublesome for long-term residents and students alike.

Find, use, and abuse as much free air conditioning as you possibly can. Get wet in a local swimming pool. Drink lots of cold water and eat ice cream for every meal (but don't forget to eat fruits and vegetables too).

Summer-proof Your Windows

A MUST to survive: Mess with the windows! I live at Anderson Place in a room that's roughly 9'x10'. I have a window that is 3'x7'. My apartment faces west, and there is no tree in front of my window. My room is a freaking oven. Against apartment policy to "install" stuff on the inside or outside. Go buy shadecloth at the local hardware store, nursery, or [WWW]Home Depot. I'm using two layers. One between the blinds and the window itself, and another on the outside of the blinds. Don't get black shadecloth!!! Get the tan, or smoke blue. Helps reflect the light. It really does help keep the room cooler if you close the blinds and have that double layer. Usually my room becomes 400 degrees by 4 pm. Now it's delayed til about 6.

Ice-Water Humidifier

Fill a humidifier (or vaporizer) with ice water and enjoy the cool mist. Note that this won't do much damage to the heat in a large room, and it's best if you are close enough that the mist falls on you.

Fan Chain

Also: A Fan chain. Really inefficient, but we only have 1 ac in the living room that doesn't reach into the hooked hallway towards the bedrooms. We end up turning it on high, and using 4 or 5 fans. One in living room to fan cool air into hallway, one in hallway to push it down, one in front of each bedroom doorway. It helps, but it's probably a ridiculous waste of power. But when it reaches those hot temperatures, anything helps.

Apartment Hunting: Choose Wisely

Best tip is think of the summer before you pick your apartment. And preferably get a lower level. Don't think "Oh this one is closest to the bus stop, so convenient" THINK OF THE SUMMER SUN! AHhahahah hhurgh.

Bicycle Air Conditioning

Ride your bike. Exercising may seem counterintuitive, but if you can stick to mainly flat, shady streets, the airflow over the skin helps a lot. Dampening your shirt beforehand helps even more. Or just buy a fan.

Schedule Your Day Around the Sun

Starting very early in the morning, open all your doors. This will allow cool morning air in. Bugs don't fly about much in the morning, so this is a good time to do this. By about 8 to 8:30 or so, you'll want to close your door. At this point, keep all the doors closed, windows closed, blinds down. This will trap the cool air (unless you live in one of those poorly designed apartments with just one window at each end and no cross-ventilation. Then you're outta luck and it's A/C time). About 7:30 to 8 p.m., when the sun's gone down or just about to set, try to check the temperature inside as compared with outside. Once the inside temperature is equal or less than outside, raise your shades, blinds, whatever, and open the windows. This will allow cool(er) air to circulate.

Cool Shower before Sleeping

Right before you go to bed, take a cool shower. This will help, especially if you have the privacy and can sleep in the buff. Your body will feel somewhat cooler and it'll be easier to get comfortable and try to sleep.

Kiddie Pool!!

Get a kiddie pool and while it's filling with water, get a cooler of drink and your phone or a good mag, then park your butt for the afternoon. Now head over to the hammock and air dry, then repeat. Summer's way more fun without air conditioning!

Homebrew A/C

Build a [WWW]Homebrew Air Conditioning System.

Don't Waste the Cool Times of Day

Don't sleep in. On broiling hot days, mornings and evenings (after the sun goes down, anyways) tend to be very pleasant. Do as much as possible before about 10:00AM or after about 7:00PM, and then as little as possible during the middle of the day.

Exercise at Cooler Hours, in Shady Places

You can still walk, jog or run. Just do so in the morning before 8 a.m. or 9 a.m.—depending on the predicted temperature for the day—in a shaded area. My favorite spot is the tree-lined path along Russell Boulevard, aka the Avenue of Trees, just west of Highway 113. (Or buy an ARC membership during the summer if you are not enrolled at UC Davis during the summer.)

Freeze Your Clothes

You can freeze a t-shirt nicely in the freezer and then put it on for a rush of cold. Works well if the shirt isn't too wet, just a bit.

Drink Cold Fluids

Chill some water bottles and take them with you when you go out, and remember to refill and replace them in the refrigerator when they are empty. If you are really hot and you need to cool off fast, try drinking liquids that contain sugar and other dissolved solutes, such as Lemonade. The sugar lowers the freezing point of the drink so when you add ice, the Lemonade, for example, actually gets colder than plain ice water ever can. It should cool you off faster.

Sleeping Cooler

Use a wet towel as your blanket. The water will evaporate and it will cool you down. The cool towel makes a huge difference.

Daytime Wet Tower

You can also use a wet towel during the day. Wet a towel and wrap yourself with it. The cooling effect is actually quite decent if you are stuck without air conditioning.

Summer Session Classes are Air-Conditioned

If you're taking Summer Sessions, have your classes in the afternoon and early evening. You sit and learn in a nice, cool, air-conditioned classroom.

Resources

see also Fall in Davis

Comments:

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2005-06-17 14:51:42   This is a disambiguation page. You might also be looking for Summer in Davis. —CarlMcCabe


2005-06-17 16:51:06   I moved here at the beginning of the summer and was so surprised when everyone came back and the town changed practically overnight! —SummerSong


2005-06-23 19:26:00   A note about cons - I don't agreee with point three- I'm happy when your friends have gone home for the summer. More parking for me and my friends. OMGLOL —MarieBoisvert


2006-03-30 19:42:28   Summer in davis is surviveable, just annoying. Strategically placed fans in your dwelling can fix the problem of expensive AC. Oh, and leaving windows open during the night can help keep the house cool during the day. It might also help that my entire house is tiled. It keeps things nice and cold. —JulienBiewerElstob


2006-06-03 20:39:54   Go see movies mid-afternoon during the hottest time of the day. It's cheaper anyway. Bring a sweater or long sleeve shirt because the theater is feels very cold. Save precious cooler evening hours for outdoor activities.

Try to wear as little as possible and as loose as possible. Buy comfortable sunglasses and wearing a hat can prevent headaches from squinting. Get used to carrying a water bottle and keep it filled. —SharlaDaly


2006-06-27 13:35:56   Is it just me or are Summer Sessions freakishly more busy than in previous years? This is my third summer session at Davis and I've never seen so many freaking people! I used to like it more because I felt like I owned campus. —SS


2006-06-28 02:03:28   I love taking classes in summer session. The classes are nice and small, the campus is nice and empty and quiet. I'm active during the normal school year and am a social person, but it's really quite a relief in the summers. I always feel a little claustrophobic when campus explodes in the fall —AlvinTsao


2006-07-25 16:34:19   Given the power situation in California right now, I recommend that people try to reduce the usage of AC during peak hours. A lot of California is experiencing this extraordinary heat right now, and there could be rolling blackouts. Run your AC at night or early morning to cool it off, and close your blinds to keep heat from getting in - that should help keep the temperature down while reducing strain on energy supplies. —KarlMogel


2006-08-29 11:16:13   I take back my previous comment, mostly 'cause summer sessions 2 is really f-ing boring. —SS


2007-10-15 23:01:07   I <3 Summer Session. The only thing i disliked was roasting on my way to class. Campus is quiet, the library reserves let you keep books over Saturdays, and best of all - No bike circle accidents FTW. —RobertSooHoo


2008-02-25 22:40:59   Pros: "Townies get their town back for 3 months"

If the townies only have Davis for 3 months, is it really their town? Or does it belong to the students, who "get" Davis for 9 months? —MikeTahani


2008-06-14 00:12:21   Heat sucks. Go home if you can. —BreeButler

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