Recent Changes for "Tai Chi" - Davis Wikihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_ChiRecent Changes of the page "Tai Chi" on Davis Wiki.en-us Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2014-06-26 15:17:30DanielPfister <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 31: </td> <td> Line 31: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * [http://www.daviskungfu.com/ Davis Kung Fu] where instruction is given Shifu [Daniel Pfister] in Taijiquan (Tai Chi) as well as other Chinese ''internal'' boxing arts like xingyiquan and baguazhang. </td> <td> <span>+</span> * [http://www.daviskungfu.com/ Davis Kung Fu] where instruction is given Shifu [<span>"</span>Daniel Pfister<span>"</span>] in Taijiquan (Tai Chi) as well as other Chinese ''internal'' boxing arts like xingyiquan and baguazhang. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2014-06-26 15:16:58DanielPfister <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 31: </td> <td> Line 31: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * [http://www.daviskungfu.com/ Davis Kung Fu] where instruction is given in Taijiquan (Tai Chi) as well as other Chinese ''internal'' boxing arts like xingyiquan and baguazhang. </td> <td> <span>+</span> * [http://www.daviskungfu.com/ Davis Kung Fu] where instruction is given <span>Shifu [Daniel Pfister] </span>in Taijiquan (Tai Chi) as well as other Chinese ''internal'' boxing arts like xingyiquan and baguazhang. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2014-06-26 15:15:50DanielPfister <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 31: </td> <td> Line 31: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * [http://www.daviskungfu.com/ Davis Kung Fu] where instruction is given in Taijiquan (Tai Chi) as well as other Chinese ''internal'' boxing arts like xingyiquan and baguazhang.<br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2014-06-26 15:13:11DanielPfister <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 17: </td> <td> Line 17: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> *<span>&nbsp;through the</span> ["SPAC"] undergraduate and graduate student ["Tai Chi Club at UC Davis"];<br> <span>-</span> *<span>&nbsp;through the</span> ["Experimental College"] <span>(EC course #221-1a thru #221-1d, 223-1a, and 223-1b)</span> taught by ["Users/DanielPfister" Daniel Pfister] -- see the [https://ecollege.ucdavis.edu/classes/search?term=summer-2014-session-1&amp;group=&amp;instructor=100939&amp;q= Summer 2014 schedule]for details;<span><br> - * [and, there also used to be at the ["ARC"] through the ["ARC Martial Arts Program"] and the ["Wellness Center" ARC Wellness Program], but these unfortunately seem to have been discontinued, - better check their current catalog].</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> * ["SPAC"] undergraduate and graduate student ["Tai Chi Club at UC Davis"];<br> <span>+</span> * ["Experimental College"] <span>classes</span> taught by ["Users/DanielPfister" Daniel Pfister] -- see the [https://ecollege.ucdavis.edu/classes/search?term=summer-2014-session-1&amp;group=&amp;instructor=100939&amp;q= Summer 2014 schedule]<span>&nbsp;</span>for details; </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 21: </td> <td> Line 20: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- *For the Spring 2013 quarter at the ["Experimental College"], ["Users/DanielPfister" Daniel Pfister] will be offering a Sunday 9 am course in the 37 Posture Tai Chi form (EC course #221-1), as well as Friday and Saturday evening courses in two other internal martial arts Xingyiquan (Xingyi Boxing, EC course #222-1a) and Baguazhang (EC course #222-1b). See the [http://ecollege.ucdavis.edu/courses/catalog?term=__None&amp;group=130&amp;instructor=100306&amp;number=&amp;name= Spring 2013 schedule]<br> - <br> - These include a series of courses on the UC Davis ["campus"], led by Jim Clingingsmith (Quan Ping Style) and by Daniel Quincy (Yang Style):</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 31: </td> <td> Line 27: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- There sure are lots of opportunities to do great T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan) on the UC Davis campus! The ["Experimental College"] classes, by the way, are open to anyone; you do not have to be affiliated with the UC Davis community to enrole in them.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 34: </td> <td> Line 30: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2014-06-26 15:07:06DanielPfister <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 18: </td> <td> Line 18: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * through the ["Experimental College"] (EC course #221-1a thru #221-1d, 223-1a, and 223-1b) taught by ["Users/DanielPfister" Daniel Pfister] -- see the [http://ecollege.ucdavis.edu/c<span>ourses/catalog</span>?term=<span>__None</span>&amp;group=<span>1</span>3<span>0</span>&amp;<span>instructor=100306&amp;number&amp;name</span> Summer 201<span>3</span> schedule]<span>&nbsp;</span>for details; </td> <td> <span>+</span> * through the ["Experimental College"] (EC course #221-1a thru #221-1d, 223-1a, and 223-1b) taught by ["Users/DanielPfister" Daniel Pfister] -- see the [http<span>s</span>://ecollege.ucdavis.edu/c<span>lasses/search</span>?term=<span>summer-2014-session-1</span>&amp;group=<span>&amp;instructor=1009</span>3<span>9</span>&amp;<span>q=</span> Summer 201<span>4</span> schedule]for details; </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2014-04-03 10:18:33KimberlyD <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- </span> </td> <td> <span>+ ||[http://www.internationalhousedavis.org/programs/classes-and-workshops/dance-fitness/?preview=true&amp;preview_id=4166&amp;preview_nonce=e4f499ac94 International House Davis]||</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2014-01-17 14:30:42NidaAhmed <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 36: </td> <td> Line 36: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ *The ["International House Davis"] also offers Tai Chi classes Monday-Friday, taught by Michael Brown. The first session is 'Morning Meditation/Tai Chi' at 7:15am-8am and the 'Coaching Instruction' session is from 8am-8:30am. The class is free for International House members and $10 for non-members.<br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2013-06-22 11:05:32DanielPfister <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 18: </td> <td> Line 18: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * through the ["Experimental College"] (EC course #221-1, 223-1a, and 223-1b) taught by ["Users/DanielPfister" Daniel Pfister] -- see the [http://ecollege.ucdavis.edu/courses/catalog?term=__None&amp;group=130&amp;instructor=100306&amp;number<span>=&amp;name=</span> S<span>pring</span> 2013 schedule] for details; </td> <td> <span>+</span> * through the ["Experimental College"] (EC course #221-1<span>a thru #221-1d</span>, 223-1a, and 223-1b) taught by ["Users/DanielPfister" Daniel Pfister] -- see the [http://ecollege.ucdavis.edu/courses/catalog?term=__None&amp;group=130&amp;instructor=100306&amp;number<span>&amp;name</span> S<span>ummer</span> 2013 schedule] for details; </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2013-05-15 20:10:50DanielPfister <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 18: </td> <td> Line 18: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * through the ["Experimental College"] (EC course #221-1, 223-1a, and 223-1b) taught by ["Daniel<span>&nbsp;</span>Pfister"]-- see the [http://ecollege.ucdavis.edu/courses/catalog?term=__None&amp;group=130&amp;instructor=100306&amp;number=&amp;name= Spring 2013 schedule] for details; </td> <td> <span>+</span> * through the ["Experimental College"] (EC course #221-1, 223-1a, and 223-1b) taught by ["<span>Users/</span>DanielPfister"<span>&nbsp;Daniel Pfister</span>]<span>&nbsp;</span>-- see the [http://ecollege.ucdavis.edu/courses/catalog?term=__None&amp;group=130&amp;instructor=100306&amp;number=&amp;name= Spring 2013 schedule] for details; </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2013-05-15 20:09:03DanielPfister <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 18: </td> <td> Line 18: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * through the ["Experimental College"] (EC course #221-1, 223-1a, and 223-1b) -- see the [http://ecollege.ucdavis.edu/courses/catalog?term=__None&amp;group=130&amp;instructor=100306&amp;number=&amp;name= Spring 2013 schedule] for details; </td> <td> <span>+</span> * through the ["Experimental College"] (EC course #221-1, 223-1a, and 223-1b) <span>taught by ["Daniel Pfister"]</span>-- see the [http://ecollege.ucdavis.edu/courses/catalog?term=__None&amp;group=130&amp;instructor=100306&amp;number=&amp;name= Spring 2013 schedule] for details; </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2013-04-07 15:38:17DanielPfisteradded map <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- </span> </td> <td> <span>+ ||&lt;bgcolor='#E0E0FF'&gt;'''Location'''||<br> + ||[https://maps.google.com/maps/ms?msid=205434413420373353235.0004d9caedf9321915cb0&amp;msa=0&amp;ll=38.541872,-121.749501&amp;spn=0.01398,0.028389 Interactive Kung Fu and Tai Chi Map]||</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2013-04-07 14:42:36DanielPfister <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- [[address(https://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&amp;client=firefox-a&amp;hs=AzH&amp;rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&amp;q=South+Silo+UC+Davis&amp;bav=on.2,or.r_cp.r_qf.&amp;bvm=bv.44770516,d.cGE&amp;biw=1704&amp;bih=936&amp;um=1&amp;ie=UTF-8&amp;sa=N&amp;tab=wl)]]</span> </td> <td> <span>+ </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2013-04-07 14:42:02DanielPfister <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ [[address(https://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&amp;client=firefox-a&amp;hs=AzH&amp;rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&amp;q=South+Silo+UC+Davis&amp;bav=on.2,or.r_cp.r_qf.&amp;bvm=bv.44770516,d.cGE&amp;biw=1704&amp;bih=936&amp;um=1&amp;ie=UTF-8&amp;sa=N&amp;tab=wl)]]<br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2013-04-07 14:32:05DanielPfister <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 15: </td> <td> Line 15: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * through the ["Experimental College"] (EC course #221-1, 223-1a, and 223-1b) -- see the [http://ecollege.ucdavis.edu/courses/catalog?term=__None&amp;group=130&amp;instructor=100306&amp;number=&amp;name=] for details; </td> <td> <span>+</span> * through the ["Experimental College"] (EC course #221-1, 223-1a, and 223-1b) -- see the [http://ecollege.ucdavis.edu/courses/catalog?term=__None&amp;group=130&amp;instructor=100306&amp;number=&amp;name=<span>&nbsp;Spring 2013 schedule</span>] for details; </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2013-04-07 14:30:27DanielPfister <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 15: </td> <td> Line 15: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * through the ["Experimental College"] (EC course #221-1) -- see the [http<span>s</span>://<span>docs</span>.<span>google</span>.<span>com/</span>f<span>ile/d/0BxC-_QIQXAYuYlN2M3A4SnZoY00/edit EC catalog] f</span>or details; </td> <td> <span>+</span> * through the ["Experimental College"] (EC course #221-1<span>, 223-1a, and 223-1b</span>) -- see the [http://<span>ecollege</span>.<span>ucdavis</span>.<span>edu/courses/catalog?term=__None&amp;group=130&amp;instructor=100306&amp;number=&amp;name=] </span>for details; </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2013-03-30 11:38:52DanielPfister <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 18: </td> <td> Line 18: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> *For the <span>Winter</span> 2013 quarter at the ["Experimental College"], ["Users/DanielPfister" Daniel Pfister] will be offering a Sunday <span>8</span> am course in the 37 Posture Tai Chi form (EC course #221-1), as well as Saturday evening courses in two other internal martial arts Xingyiquan (Xingyi Boxing, EC course #222-1a) and Baguazhang (EC course #222-1b). </td> <td> <span>+</span> *For the <span>Spring</span> 2013 quarter at the ["Experimental College"], ["Users/DanielPfister" Daniel Pfister] will be offering a Sunday <span>9</span> am course in the 37 Posture Tai Chi form (EC course #221-1), as well as <span>Friday and </span>Saturday evening courses in two other internal martial arts Xingyiquan (Xingyi Boxing, EC course #222-1a) and Baguazhang (EC course #222-1b).<span>&nbsp;See the [http://ecollege.ucdavis.edu/courses/catalog?term=__None&amp;group=130&amp;instructor=100306&amp;number=&amp;name= Spring 2013 schedule]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2012-12-17 11:24:04DanielPfister <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 18: </td> <td> Line 18: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> *For the Winter 2013 quarter at the ["Experimental College"], ["Daniel<span>&nbsp;</span>Pfister"] will be offering a Sunday 8 am course in the 37 Posture Tai Chi form (EC course #221-1), as well as Saturday evening courses in two other internal martial arts Xingyiquan (Xingyi Boxing, EC course #222-1a) and Baguazhang (EC course #222-1b). </td> <td> <span>+</span> *For the Winter 2013 quarter at the ["Experimental College"], ["<span>Users/</span>DanielPfister"<span>&nbsp;Daniel Pfister</span>] will be offering a Sunday 8 am course in the 37 Posture Tai Chi form (EC course #221-1), as well as Saturday evening courses in two other internal martial arts Xingyiquan (Xingyi Boxing, EC course #222-1a) and Baguazhang (EC course #222-1b). </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2012-12-17 11:18:28DanielPfister <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 17: </td> <td> Line 17: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + *For the Winter 2013 quarter at the ["Experimental College"], ["Daniel Pfister"] will be offering a Sunday 8 am course in the 37 Posture Tai Chi form (EC course #221-1), as well as Saturday evening courses in two other internal martial arts Xingyiquan (Xingyi Boxing, EC course #222-1a) and Baguazhang (EC course #222-1b).</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2012-12-17 10:55:58DanielPfisterUpdate for latest catalog information <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 15: </td> <td> Line 15: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * through the ["Experimental College"] (EC course<span>s</span> #2<span>0</span>1-1<span>, #201-2 &amp; #202</span>) -- see the [https://docs.google.com/file/d/0BxC-_QIQXAYuYlN2M3A4SnZoY00/edit EC catalog] for details; </td> <td> <span>+</span> * through the ["Experimental College"] (EC course #2<span>2</span>1-1) -- see the [https://docs.google.com/file/d/0BxC-_QIQXAYuYlN2M3A4SnZoY00/edit EC catalog] for details; </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2012-12-17 10:52:14DanielPfister <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 15: </td> <td> Line 15: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * through the ["Experimental College"] (EC courses #201-1, #201-2 &amp; #202) -- see the [http://<span>asu</span>c<span>d.ucdavi</span>s.ed<span>u/exper</span>i<span>men</span>t<span>alcollege/index.cfm</span> EC catalog] for details; </td> <td> <span>+</span> * through the ["Experimental College"] (EC courses #201-1, #201-2 &amp; #202) -- see the [http<span>s</span>://<span>do</span>cs.<span>google.com/file/d/0BxC-_QIQXAYuYlN2M3A4SnZoY00/</span>edit EC catalog] for details; </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2012-10-19 11:04:27DeniseLichtig <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 29: </td> <td> Line 29: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * Si<span>f</span>u ["Denise Platt Lichtig"] teaches Tai Chi Chuan and owns the Lien-Ying Tai-Chi Chuan Academy IV. She continues to teach in the tradition handed down to Master Kuo, with beginning and continuing classes at 1904 ["Humboldt Avenue"] Tuesday mornings at 7:00 am or Thursday evenings at 6:30 pm. [http://www.deniselichtig.com/tai-chi.htm] </td> <td> <span>+</span> * Si<span>m</span>u ["Denise Platt Lichtig"] teaches Tai Chi Chuan and owns the Lien-Ying Tai-Chi Chuan Academy IV. She continues to teach in the tradition handed down to Master Kuo, with beginning and continuing classes at 1904 ["Humboldt Avenue"] Tuesday mornings at 7:00 am or Thursday evenings at 6:30 pm. [http://www.deniselichtig.com/tai-chi.htm] </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2012-08-29 12:19:31DeniseLichtig <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 29: </td> <td> Line 29: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * Sifu ["Denise Platt Lichtig"] teaches Tai Chi Chuan and owns the Lien-Ying Tai-Chi Chuan Academy IV. She continues to teach in the tradition handed down to Master Kuo, with beginning and continuing classes at 1904 ["Humboldt Avenue"] Thursday evenings at 6:30 pm. [http://www.deniselichtig.com/tai-chi.htm] </td> <td> <span>+</span> * Sifu ["Denise Platt Lichtig"] teaches Tai Chi Chuan and owns the Lien-Ying Tai-Chi Chuan Academy IV. She continues to teach in the tradition handed down to Master Kuo, with beginning and continuing classes at 1904 ["Humboldt Avenue"] T<span>uesday mornings at 7:00 am or T</span>hursday evenings at 6:30 pm. [http://www.deniselichtig.com/tai-chi.htm] </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2012-07-20 13:16:28DeniseLichtig <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 29: </td> <td> Line 29: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * Sifu ["Denise Platt Lichtig"] teaches Tai Chi Chuan and owns the Lien-Ying Tai-Chi Chuan Academy IV. She continues to teach in the tradition handed down to Master Kuo, with beginning and continuing classes <span>in</span> ["<span>Westwood Park</span>"]<span>&nbsp;Tuesday mornings at 7 am and</span> Thursday evenings at 6:30 pm. [http://www.deniselichtig.com/tai-chi.htm] </td> <td> <span>+</span> * Sifu ["Denise Platt Lichtig"] teaches Tai Chi Chuan and owns the Lien-Ying Tai-Chi Chuan Academy IV. She continues to teach in the tradition handed down to Master Kuo, with beginning and continuing classes <span>at 1904</span> ["<span>Humboldt Avenue</span>"] Thursday evenings at 6:30 pm. [http://www.deniselichtig.com/tai-chi.htm] </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2012-06-07 14:43:48DeniseLichtig <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 29: </td> <td> Line 29: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * Sifu ["Denise Platt Lichtig"] teaches Tai Chi Chuan and owns the Lien-Ying Tai-Chi Chuan Academy IV. She continues to teach in the tradition handed down to Master Kuo, with beginning and continuing classes in ["Westwood Park"] Tuesday mornings at 7 am and Thursday evenings at 6:30 pm. </td> <td> <span>+</span> * Sifu ["Denise Platt Lichtig"] teaches Tai Chi Chuan and owns the Lien-Ying Tai-Chi Chuan Academy IV. She continues to teach in the tradition handed down to Master Kuo, with beginning and continuing classes in ["Westwood Park"] Tuesday mornings at 7 am and Thursday evenings at 6:30 pm.<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;[http://www.deniselichtig.com/tai-chi.htm]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2012-06-07 14:40:01DeniseLichtig <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 29: </td> <td> Line 29: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- * ["Denise Platt Lichtig"] - beginning and continuing classes in ["Westwood Park"]</span> </td> <td> <span>+ * Sifu ["Denise Platt Lichtig"] teaches Tai Chi Chuan and owns the Lien-Ying Tai-Chi Chuan Academy IV. She continues to teach in the tradition handed down to Master Kuo, with beginning and continuing classes in ["Westwood Park"] Tuesday mornings at 7 am and Thursday evenings at 6:30 pm.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2012-02-19 23:30:00KeithGrzelak <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 33: </td> <td> Line 33: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Private lessons in the arts of Tai Chi and Xing YI are <span>availa</span>b<span>le</span> <span>through ["</span>Keith Grzelak<span>'s</span> <span>Body</span>wor<span>k &amp; I</span>nt<span>ernal Arts</span>"]. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Private lessons in the arts of Tai Chi and Xing YI are <span>offered </span>b<span>y</span> Keith Grzelak w<span>ith ["F</span>or<span>m-Mi</span>n<span>d-Spiri</span>t"]. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2012-02-07 21:20:09KeithGrzelak <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 33: </td> <td> Line 33: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ Private lessons in the arts of Tai Chi and Xing YI are available through ["Keith Grzelak's Bodywork &amp; Internal Arts"].<br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2011-08-18 15:12:21TomGarberson <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 28: </td> <td> Line 28: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ There are classes not affiliated with UCD, as well, including:<br> + * ["Denise Platt Lichtig"] - beginning and continuing classes in ["Westwood Park"]<br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2009-12-16 00:55:45WilliamLewisRevert to version 24 (restoring to the correct format used by the university.). <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 23: </td> <td> Line 23: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * at Noon ~ 12:40-12:55 P.M. (Tues in the "Half-Circle/Triangle" between ["Sciences Laboratory Building" SciLab] &amp; ["Briggs Hall" Briggs], and Thurs on the lawn or the patio East of ["<span>Chem </span>194"]); </td> <td> <span>+</span> * at Noon ~ 12:40-12:55 P.M. (Tues in the "Half-Circle/Triangle" between ["Sciences Laboratory Building" SciLab] &amp; ["Briggs Hall" Briggs], and Thurs on the lawn or the patio East of ["194<span>&nbsp;Chem</span>"]); </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2009-12-16 00:42:42PhilipNeustromRevert to version 23. <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 23: </td> <td> Line 23: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * at Noon ~ 12:40-12:55 P.M. (Tues in the "Half-Circle/Triangle" between ["Sciences Laboratory Building" SciLab] &amp; ["Briggs Hall" Briggs], and Thurs on the lawn or the patio East of ["194<span>&nbsp;Chem</span>"]); </td> <td> <span>+</span> * at Noon ~ 12:40-12:55 P.M. (Tues in the "Half-Circle/Triangle" between ["Sciences Laboratory Building" SciLab] &amp; ["Briggs Hall" Briggs], and Thurs on the lawn or the patio East of ["<span>Chem </span>194"]); </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2009-12-15 23:34:29WilliamLewis(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 23: </td> <td> Line 23: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * at Noon ~ 12:40-12:55 P.M. (Tues in the "Half-Circle/Triangle" between ["Sciences Laboratory Building" SciLab] &amp; ["Briggs Hall" Briggs], and Thurs on the lawn or the patio East of ["<span>Chem </span>194"]); </td> <td> <span>+</span> * at Noon ~ 12:40-12:55 P.M. (Tues in the "Half-Circle/Triangle" between ["Sciences Laboratory Building" SciLab] &amp; ["Briggs Hall" Briggs], and Thurs on the lawn or the patio East of ["194<span>&nbsp;Chem</span>"]); </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2009-03-13 21:53:01JasonAller(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 21: </td> <td> Line 21: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * at Sunrise ~ 7:30 A.M. (Tues &amp; Thurs, at the ["Eucalyptus Grove"], North of ["Mann Laboratory"]; and Weds, on the North-East terrace/patio of the Carlson ["Health Science Library"], -- check with Sifu Quincy for exact "sunrise t'ai-chi" times during the current season of the year!); </td> <td> <span>+</span> * at Sunrise ~ 7:30 A.M. (Tues &amp; Thurs, at the ["Eucalyptus Grove"], North of ["Mann Laboratory"]; and Weds, on the North-East terrace/patio of the Carlson ["Health Science<span>s</span> Library"], -- check with Sifu Quincy for exact "sunrise t'ai-chi" times during the current season of the year!); </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2007-01-31 10:40:31JimmyPan <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 33: </td> <td> Line 33: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- * ''I would highly recommend against taking Tai Chi from Daniel Quincy. He is a squatter that refuses to pay rent or leave the house, and is unreasonable when it comes to addressing any house issues, or fulfilling any responsibilities. I personally cannot believe the man is a Martial Art instructor, but if thats fine with you, then by all means take his classes." ["JimmyPan" JimmyPan]</span> </td> <td> <span>+ * ''I would highly recommend against taking Tai Chi from Daniel Quincy. I personally cannot believe the man is a Martial Art instructor. [edit]Despite his being very behind on a lot of rent/utility payments, I changed what I wrote, so that the guy wouldn't attempt to sue me for "defamatory comments" [/edit]" ["JimmyPan" JimmyPan]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2007-01-12 22:58:17JimmyPan <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 31: </td> <td> Line 31: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ -------<br> + <br> + * ''I would highly recommend against taking Tai Chi from Daniel Quincy. He is a squatter that refuses to pay rent or leave the house, and is unreasonable when it comes to addressing any house issues, or fulfilling any responsibilities. I personally cannot believe the man is a Martial Art instructor, but if thats fine with you, then by all means take his classes." ["JimmyPan" JimmyPan]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2006-11-06 16:55:49JimmyPan <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 31: </td> <td> Line 31: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- <br> - <br> - -------------<br> - I know Sifu (and Dr.) Daniel Quincy will probably attempt to erase this comment for the sake of objectivity on this page, but I thought I'd vouch for him if anyone is interested in taking Tai Chi at all. I live with him, and he is a very intelligent, knowledgable, and heartful guy. He has been doing Tai Chi for a very long time, and I hear him on the phone all the time with his students. If you are remotely curious about Tai Chi at all, or just need some advice, give him a call and I'm sure he'd be more than glad to help. -JimmyPan (apologies for not having a proper comment section)</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2006-10-17 11:04:33DanielQuincyoooopses <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 21: </td> <td> Line 21: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * at Sunrise ~ 7:30 A.M. (Tues &amp; Thurs, at the ["Eucalyptus Grove"], North of ["Mann Laboratory"]; and Weds, on the North-East terrace/patio of the <span>["</span>Carlson <span>Medical</span> Science Library"<span>&nbsp;Medical Science Library</span>], -- check with Sifu Quincy for exact "sunrise t'ai-chi" times during the current season of the year!);<br> <span>-</span> * mornings ~ 11-11:50 A.M. (Tues &amp; Thurs) under the ["Mullberry Tree"] in the ["Young Hall<span>&nbsp;Courtyard" Young]</span>; </td> <td> <span>+</span> * at Sunrise ~ 7:30 A.M. (Tues &amp; Thurs, at the ["Eucalyptus Grove"], North of ["Mann Laboratory"]; and Weds, on the North-East terrace/patio of the Carlson <span>["Health</span> Science Library"], -- check with Sifu Quincy for exact "sunrise t'ai-chi" times during the current season of the year!);<br> <span>+</span> * mornings ~ 11-11:50 A.M. (Tues &amp; Thurs) under the ["Mullberry Tree"] in the ["Young Hall<span>"] courtyard</span>; </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 24: </td> <td> Line 24: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * afternoons (3:20-4:50 P.M., Tues &amp; Weds at the ["ARC"] in the ["ARC Martial Arts Room"] -- but not Fall Quarter!); and, </td> <td> <span>+</span> * afternoons (<span>~ </span>3:20-4:50 P.M., Tues &amp; Weds at the ["ARC"] in the ["ARC Martial Arts Room"] -- but not Fall Quarter!); and, </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2006-10-17 10:51:32DanielQuincymostly updates &amp; minor corrections <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 14: </td> <td> Line 14: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * through the ["SPAC"] undergraduate and graduate student ["Tai Chi Club at UC Davis"]<span>,</span><br> <span>- * at the ["ARC"] through the ["ARC Martial Arts Program"] and the ["Wellness Center" ARC Wellness Program],<br> -</span> * through the ["Experimental College"] (EC courses #201 &amp; #202) - see the [http://asucd.ucdavis.edu/experimentalcollege/index.cfm EC catalog] for details. </td> <td> <span>+</span> * through the ["SPAC"] undergraduate and graduate student ["Tai Chi Club at UC Davis"]<span>;</span><br> <span>+</span> * through the ["Experimental College"] (EC courses #201<span>-1, #201-2</span> &amp; #202) -<span>-</span> see the [http://asucd.ucdavis.edu/experimentalcollege/index.cfm EC catalog] for details<span>;<br> + * [and, there also used to be at the ["ARC"] through the ["ARC Martial Arts Program"] and the ["Wellness Center" ARC Wellness Program], but these unfortunately seem to have been discontinued, - better check their current catalog]</span>. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 20: </td> <td> Line 20: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * Sifu Daniel Quincy's [wiki:WikiPedia:Yang_style_Tai_Chi_Chuan Yang Style] courses (EC#201-1,..., and others) are taught at various times of the day, -- including:<br> <span>-</span> * at Sunrise ~ 7 A.M. (Tues<span>.</span> &amp; Thurs, at the ["Eucalyptus Grove"], North of ["Mann Laboratory"]; and Weds, <span>at the ["Intra</span>m<span>ural (IM) Field"] by 'A' &amp; 3rd Streets</span>);<br> <span>-</span> * mornings 11-1<span>2</span> A.M. (Tues &amp; Thurs) <span>at the ["AR</span>C<span>"] in the ["ARC Group Exercise Room"</span>];<br> <span>-</span> * at Noon <span>(</span>12:<span>1</span>0-12:5<span>0</span> P.M., <span>on</span> T<span>ues in the ["Sciences Laboratory Building" SciLab] &amp; ["Briggs Hall" Briggs] "Triangle", and on Thurs in the area</span> East of ["Chem 194"]);<br> <span>-</span> * afternoons (3:20-4:50 P.M., Tues &amp; Weds at the ["ARC"] in the ["ARC Martial Arts Room"]); and,<br> <span>-</span> * evenings (5:20-6:30 P.M. <span>Tues &amp; Weds,</span> &amp; 7:30-8:50 P.M. T<span>ues,</span> by the ["Surge IV"] Buildings, -- in Fall &amp; Winter on the ["Surge IV"] central deck area, in Spring &amp; Summer on the field So. of ["Surge IV"]; <span>and also some Fridays </span>6:30<span>-</span>7:50 P.M. at the ["ARC"] in the ["ARC Martial Arts Room"]).<br> <span>-</span> There sure are lots of opportunities to do great T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan) on the UC Davis campus! The ["Experimental College"] classes, by the way, are open to anyone; you do not have to be a<span>&nbsp;member o</span>f the UC Davis community to enrole in them. </td> <td> <span>+</span> * Sifu Daniel Quincy's [wiki:WikiPedia:Yang_style_Tai_Chi_Chuan Yang Style] courses (EC#201-1,<span>&nbsp;#201-2,</span>..., and others) are taught at various times of the day, -- including:<br> <span>+</span> * at Sunrise ~ 7<span>:30</span> A.M. (Tues &amp; Thurs, at the ["Eucalyptus Grove"], North of ["Mann Laboratory"]; and Weds, <span>on the North-East terrace/patio of the ["Carlson Medical Science Library" Medical Science Library], -- check with Sifu Quincy for exact "sunrise t'ai-chi" ti</span>m<span>es during the current season of the year!</span>);<br> <span>+</span> * mornings<span>&nbsp;~</span> 11-1<span>1:50</span> A.M. (Tues &amp; Thurs) <span>under the ["Mullberry Tree"] in the ["Young Hall </span>C<span>ourtyard" Young</span>];<br> <span>+</span> * at Noon <span>~ </span>12:<span>4</span>0-12:5<span>5</span> P.M.<span>&nbsp;(Tues in the "Half-Circle/Triangle" between ["Sciences Laboratory Building" SciLab] &amp; ["Briggs Hall" Briggs]</span>, <span>and</span> T<span>hurs on the lawn or the patio</span> East of ["Chem 194"]);<br> <span>+</span> * afternoons (3:20-4:50 P.M., Tues &amp; Weds at the ["ARC"] in the ["ARC Martial Arts Room"]<span>&nbsp;-- but not Fall Quarter!</span>); and,<br> <span>+</span> * evenings (<span>Tues </span>5:20-6:30 P.M. <span>(Ch'uan (quan) solo Form)</span> &amp; 7:30-8:50 P.M. <span>(</span>T<span>'ui Shou &amp; San Shou martial play)</span> by the ["Surge IV"] Buildings, -- in Fall &amp; Winter on the ["Surge IV"] central deck area, in Spring &amp; Summer on the field So. of ["Surge IV"]; <span>Weds 5:20-</span>6:30<span>&nbsp;P.M. (Gan/pole, Dao/sabre, Jian/sword) by ["East Quad Drive"] on the ["Quad"]; and also some Fridays ~ </span>7<span>:00-8</span>:50 P.M. at the ["ARC"] in the ["ARC Martial Arts Room"]).<br> <span>+</span> There sure are lots of opportunities to do great T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan) on the UC Davis campus! The ["Experimental College"] classes, by the way, are open to anyone; you do not have to be af<span>filiated with</span> the UC Davis community to enrole in them. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 28: </td> <td> Line 28: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Downtown in the City of Davis, California instruction is available through the ["Aikido Institute Davis"]. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Downtown in the City of Davis, California instruction is available through the ["Aikido Institute Davis"]<span>, the ["Davis Art Center"], the ["Davis Senior Center"], and the ["Davis Senior High School"]</span>. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2006-09-06 20:35:11JimmyPan <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 33: </td> <td> Line 33: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- _________________________</span> </td> <td> <span>+ -------------</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2006-09-06 20:34:36JimmyPan <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 13: </td> <td> Line 13: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> At UC Davis there are many opportunities for obtaining quality instruction, including<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><br> <span>-</span> * through the ["SPAC"] undergraduate and graduate student ["Tai Chi Club at UC Davis"],<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><br> <span>-</span> * at the ["ARC"] through the ["ARC Martial Arts Program"] and the ["Wellness Center" ARC Wellness Program],<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> At UC Davis there are many opportunities for obtaining quality instruction, including<br> <span>+</span> * through the ["SPAC"] undergraduate and graduate student ["Tai Chi Club at UC Davis"],<br> <span>+</span> * at the ["ARC"] through the ["ARC Martial Arts Program"] and the ["Wellness Center" ARC Wellness Program], </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 18: </td> <td> Line 18: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> These include a series of courses on the UC Davis ["campus"], led by Jim Clingingsmith (Quan Ping Style) and by Daniel Quincy (Yang Style):<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><br> <span>-</span> * Sifu Jim Clingingsmith's Quan Ping Style course (EC#202) runs every weekday at the rear of the ["Silo"] Building, near the ["Craft Center"], at 06:00 A.M. - he's a good master and always welcoming to new students.<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><br> <span>-</span> * Sifu Daniel Quincy's [wiki:WikiPedia:Yang_style_Tai_Chi_Chuan Yang Style] courses (EC#201-1,..., and others) are taught at various times of the day, -- including:<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><br> <span>-</span> * at Sunrise ~ 7 A.M. (Tues. &amp; Thurs, at the ["Eucalyptus Grove"], North of ["Mann Laboratory"]; and Weds, at the ["Intramural (IM) Field"] by 'A' &amp; 3rd Streets);<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><br> <span>-</span> * mornings 11-12 A.M. (Tues &amp; Thurs) at the ["ARC"] in the ["ARC Group Exercise Room"];<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><br> <span>-</span> * at Noon (12:10-12:50 P.M., on Tues in the ["Sciences Laboratory Building" SciLab] &amp; ["Briggs Hall" Briggs] "Triangle", and on Thurs in the area East of ["Chem 194"]);<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><br> <span>-</span> * afternoons (3:20-4:50 P.M., Tues &amp; Weds at the ["ARC"] in the ["ARC Martial Arts Room"]); and,<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><br> <span>-</span> * evenings (5:20-6:30 P.M. Tues &amp; Weds, &amp; 7:30-8:50 P.M. Tues, by the ["Surge IV"] Buildings, -- in Fall &amp; Winter on the ["Surge IV"] central deck area, in Spring &amp; Summer on the field So. of ["Surge IV"]; and also some Fridays 6:30-7:50 P.M. at the ["ARC"] in the ["ARC Martial Arts Room"]).<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> These include a series of courses on the UC Davis ["campus"], led by Jim Clingingsmith (Quan Ping Style) and by Daniel Quincy (Yang Style):<br> <span>+</span> * Sifu Jim Clingingsmith's Quan Ping Style course (EC#202) runs every weekday at the rear of the ["Silo"] Building, near the ["Craft Center"], at 06:00 A.M. - he's a good master and always welcoming to new students.<br> <span>+</span> * Sifu Daniel Quincy's [wiki:WikiPedia:Yang_style_Tai_Chi_Chuan Yang Style] courses (EC#201-1,..., and others) are taught at various times of the day, -- including:<br> <span>+</span> * at Sunrise ~ 7 A.M. (Tues. &amp; Thurs, at the ["Eucalyptus Grove"], North of ["Mann Laboratory"]; and Weds, at the ["Intramural (IM) Field"] by 'A' &amp; 3rd Streets);<br> <span>+</span> * mornings 11-12 A.M. (Tues &amp; Thurs) at the ["ARC"] in the ["ARC Group Exercise Room"];<br> <span>+</span> * at Noon (12:10-12:50 P.M., on Tues in the ["Sciences Laboratory Building" SciLab] &amp; ["Briggs Hall" Briggs] "Triangle", and on Thurs in the area East of ["Chem 194"]);<br> <span>+</span> * afternoons (3:20-4:50 P.M., Tues &amp; Weds at the ["ARC"] in the ["ARC Martial Arts Room"]); and,<br> <span>+</span> * evenings (5:20-6:30 P.M. Tues &amp; Weds, &amp; 7:30-8:50 P.M. Tues, by the ["Surge IV"] Buildings, -- in Fall &amp; Winter on the ["Surge IV"] central deck area, in Spring &amp; Summer on the field So. of ["Surge IV"]; and also some Fridays 6:30-7:50 P.M. at the ["ARC"] in the ["ARC Martial Arts Room"]). </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 32: </td> <td> Line 32: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + _________________________<br> + I know Sifu (and Dr.) Daniel Quincy will probably attempt to erase this comment for the sake of objectivity on this page, but I thought I'd vouch for him if anyone is interested in taking Tai Chi at all. I live with him, and he is a very intelligent, knowledgable, and heartful guy. He has been doing Tai Chi for a very long time, and I hear him on the phone all the time with his students. If you are remotely curious about Tai Chi at all, or just need some advice, give him a call and I'm sure he'd be more than glad to help. -JimmyPan (apologies for not having a proper comment section)</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2006-02-08 13:37:55DanielQuincyPeople new to the area might not realize that the EC Courses are open to to all. <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 26: </td> <td> Line 26: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- There sure are lots of opportunities to do great T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan) on the UC Davis campus! </span> </td> <td> <span>+ There sure are lots of opportunities to do great T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan) on the UC Davis campus! The ["Experimental College"] classes, by the way, are open to anyone; you do not have to be a member of the UC Davis community to enrole in them.</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 30: </td> <td> Line 30: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> In the above comments regarding the use of the term "Tai Chi" the following words are in the standard English written Romanization transliteration of the Mandarin Chinese words (i.e. the [wiki:WikiPedia:Wade_Giles Wade-Giles system"]): <span><br> -</span> "chi", "ch'i", "ch'i kung", "T'ai-Chi", "T'ai-Chi Ch'uan", "Taoism"; <span><br> -</span> and the equivalent words in the standard mainland Chinese Mandarin Romanization transliteration of the Mandarin Chinese (i.e. the [wiki:WikiPedia:Pin_yin Pin-Yin system]) are:<span><br> -</span> "ji", "qi", "qigong", "Taiji", "Taijiquan", "Daoism". </td> <td> <span>+</span> In the above comments regarding the use of the term "Tai Chi" the following words are in the standard English written Romanization transliteration of the Mandarin Chinese words (i.e. the [wiki:WikiPedia:Wade_Giles Wade-Giles system"]): "chi", "ch'i", "ch'i kung", "T'ai-Chi", "T'ai-Chi Ch'uan", "Taoism"; and the equivalent words in the standard mainland Chinese Mandarin Romanization transliteration of the Mandarin Chinese (i.e. the [wiki:WikiPedia:Pin_yin Pin-Yin system]) are: "ji", "qi", "qigong", "Taiji", "Taijiquan", "Daoism". </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2005-12-05 13:54:30EdwinSaadafew more link fixes, lottsa wiki:wiki <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 15: </td> <td> Line 15: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * at the ["ARC"] through the ["ARC Martial Arts Program"] and the ["ARC Wellness Program<span>"</span>], </td> <td> <span>+</span> * at the ["ARC"] through the ["ARC Martial Arts Program"] and the ["<span>Wellness Center" </span>ARC Wellness Program], </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 20: </td> <td> Line 20: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * Sifu Daniel Quincy's [<span>"</span>Yang Style<span>"</span>] courses (EC#201-1,..., and others) are taught at various times of the day, -- including: <br> <span>-</span> * at Sunrise ~ 7 A.M. (Tues. &amp; Thurs, at the ["Eucalyptus Grove"], North of ["Mann Lab"]; and Weds, at the ["Intramural (IM) Field"] by 'A' &amp; 3rd Streets); </td> <td> <span>+</span> * Sifu Daniel Quincy's [<span>wiki:WikiPedia:</span>Yang<span>_style_Tai_Chi_Chuan Yang</span> Style] courses (EC#201-1,..., and others) are taught at various times of the day, -- including: <br> <span>+</span> * at Sunrise ~ 7 A.M. (Tues. &amp; Thurs, at the ["Eucalyptus Grove"], North of ["Mann Lab<span>oratory</span>"]; and Weds, at the ["Intramural (IM) Field"] by 'A' &amp; 3rd Streets); </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 30: </td> <td> Line 30: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> In the above comments regarding the use of the term "Tai Chi" the following words are in the standard English written Romanization transliteration of the Mandarin Chinese words (i.e. the [<span>"</span>Wade-Giles system"]): </td> <td> <span>+</span> In the above comments regarding the use of the term "Tai Chi" the following words are in the standard English written Romanization transliteration of the Mandarin Chinese words (i.e. the [<span>wiki:WikiPedia:Wade_Giles </span>Wade-Giles system"]): </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 32: </td> <td> Line 32: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> and the equivalent words in the standard mainland Chinese Mandarin Romanization transliteration of the Mandarin Chinese (i.e. the [<span>"</span>Pin-Yin system<span>"</span>]) are: </td> <td> <span>+</span> and the equivalent words in the standard mainland Chinese Mandarin Romanization transliteration of the Mandarin Chinese (i.e. the [<span>wiki:WikiPedia:Pin_yin </span>Pin-Yin system]) are: </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2005-11-29 23:18:19DanielQuincyPatched up logical holes left following the recent extensive editings. <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 5: </td> <td> Line 5: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Usually, "Tai Chi" is used when actually only some particular aspect of "T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)", -- the highly disciplined, extensive and varied, so called "internal" martial practices are meant, or when only one of the various specific "Styles" of the Martial Arts that go by that name are meant. Some of the most common "Family Styles" of "T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)" are "Chen Style", "Yang Style" (pronounced with a short "aa" sound; and where "Yang" here has nothing to do with the "Yang" in the "Yin/Yang Symbol"), "Wu Style", and "Sun Style" (pronounced with a short "uu" sound). </td> <td> <span>+</span> Usually, "Tai Chi" is used when actually only some particular aspect of "T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)", -- the highly disciplined, extensive and varied, so called "internal" martial practices are meant, or when only one of the various specific "Styles" of the Martial Arts that go by that name are meant. Some of the most common "Family Styles" of "T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)" are "Chen Style", "Yang Style" (pronounced with a short "aa" sound; and where "Yang" here has nothing to do with the "Yang" in the "Yin/Yang Symbol"), "Wu Style", and "Sun Style" (pronounced with a short "uu" sound).<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;All these "internal" Martial Art styles which fall under the heading of "T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)" are of relatively recent Chinese origin, seven-hundred-and-fifty years or less. The Wikipedia article on [wiki:WikiPedia:Tai_Chi_Chuan Tai Chi Chuan] is definitely worthy of a read.</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 7: </td> <td> Line 7: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- If you are interested in learning more, look to the sources of the philosophy, at the least as refered to in [wiki:WikiPedia:Tao_Te_Ching Tao Te Ching] and the [wiki:WikiPedia:I_Ching I Ching], both of which are connected with Taoism (Daoism), a Chinese philosophical system.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ When "Tai Chi" is used to mean "T'ai-Chi (Taiji)", this refers to the Taoist (Daoist) symbol, or what in American English is often called the "Yin/Yang" symbol. This symbol refers to an ancient philosophical concept regarding the nature of what "is" actual reality, and dates back possibly two thousand years or more. If you are interested in learning more about this Chinese philosophical system, look to the sources of Taoist (Daoist) philosophy, at the least as refered to in [wiki:WikiPedia:Tao_Te_Ching Tao Te Ching] and the [wiki:WikiPedia:I_Ching I Ching].</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 9: </td> <td> Line 9: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- There are several major "Styles" and many schools of "T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)", and many methods ("forms") of practicing it. The Wikipedia article on [wiki:WikiPedia:Tai_Chi_Chuan Tai Chi Chuan] is definitely worthy of a read.<br> - <br> - == T'ai-Chi Ch'uan in Davis, California ==</span> </td> <td> <span>+ == T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan) in Davis, California ==</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 18: </td> <td> Line 16: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * through the ["Experimental College"] (EC courses #201 &amp; #202) - see the [http://asucd.ucdavis.edu/experimentalcollege/index.cfm EC catalog<span>ue</span>] for details. </td> <td> <span>+</span> * through the ["Experimental College"] (EC courses #201 &amp; #202) - see the [http://asucd.ucdavis.edu/experimentalcollege/index.cfm EC catalog] for details. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 33: </td> <td> Line 31: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> "chi", "ch'i", "ch'i kung", "T'ai-Chi", "T'ai-Chi Ch'uan"; </td> <td> <span>+</span> "chi", "ch'i", "ch'i kung", "T'ai-Chi", "T'ai-Chi Ch'uan"<span>, "Taoism"</span>; </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 35: </td> <td> Line 33: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> "ji", "qi", "qigong", "Taiji", "Taijiquan". </td> <td> <span>+</span> "ji", "qi", "qigong", "Taiji", "Taijiquan"<span>, "Daoism"</span>. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2005-11-19 16:53:25KateWatermanfix link <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 25: </td> <td> Line 25: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * at Noon (12:10-12:50 P.M., on Tues in the ["Sciences Laboratory Building" SciLab] &amp; ["Briggs Hall" Briggs] "Triangle", and on Thurs in the area East of ["Chem<span>.</span>194"]); </td> <td> <span>+</span> * at Noon (12:10-12:50 P.M., on Tues in the ["Sciences Laboratory Building" SciLab] &amp; ["Briggs Hall" Briggs] "Triangle", and on Thurs in the area East of ["Chem<span>&nbsp;</span>194"]); </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2005-11-18 07:19:09KevinWeedonTidying some of those superflous links, restored links to EC website. <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 6: </td> <td> Line 6: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- </span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 10: </td> <td> Line 9: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> -<span>&nbsp;There are several ma</span>j<span>or "Styles" and many schools of "["T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taij</span>iquan)<span>"]</span>", and many methods ("forms") of practicing it. The Wikipedia article on [wiki:WikiPedia:Tai_Chi_Chuan Tai Chi Chuan] is definitely worthy of a read. </td> <td> <span>+ There are several major "Styles" and many schools of "T'ai</span>-<span>Chi Ch'uan (Tai</span>jiquan)", and many methods ("forms") of practicing it. The Wikipedia article on [wiki:WikiPedia:Tai_Chi_Chuan Tai Chi Chuan] is definitely worthy of a read. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 14: </td> <td> Line 13: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- "["T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)"]" is(are) a Martial Art(s) and system of exercises and practices done by many throughout the World, usually under the guidance of an experienced and knowledgable teacher, or master of that art. </span> In Davis, there are quite a few teachers and groups offering classes, courses and guidance, both on the University of California (UC) Davis campus, a<span>s well as</span> in the City<span>&nbsp;of Davis</span>. </td> <td> <span>+</span> In Davis, there are quite a few teachers and groups offering classes, courses and guidance, both on the University of California (UC) Davis campus, a<span>nd</span> in the City. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 19: </td> <td> Line 18: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * through the ["Experimental College"] (EC courses #201 &amp; #202).<br> <span>-</span> These include a series of courses on the UC Davis ["campus"], led by Jim Clingingsmith (<span>["</span>Quan Ping Style<span>"]</span>) and by Daniel Quincy (<span>["</span>Yang Style<span>"]</span>): <br> <span>-</span> * Sifu Jim Clingingsmith's <span>["</span>Quan Ping Style<span>"]</span> course (EC#202) runs every weekday at the rear of the ["Silo"] Building, near the ["Craft Center"], at 06:00 A.M. - he's a good master and always welcoming to new students. </td> <td> <span>+</span> * through the ["Experimental College"] (EC courses #201 &amp; #202)<span>&nbsp;- see the [http://asucd.ucdavis.edu/experimentalcollege/index.cfm EC catalogue] for details</span>.<br> <span>+ <br> +</span> These include a series of courses on the UC Davis ["campus"], led by Jim Clingingsmith (Quan Ping Style) and by Daniel Quincy (Yang Style): <br> <span>+</span> * Sifu Jim Clingingsmith's Quan Ping Style course (EC#202) runs every weekday at the rear of the ["Silo"] Building, near the ["Craft Center"], at 06:00 A.M. - he's a good master and always welcoming to new students. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 28: </td> <td> Line 28: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> There sure are lots of opportunities to do great <span>["</span>T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)<span>"]</span> on the UC Davis campus! </td> <td> <span>+</span> There sure are lots of opportunities to do great T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan) on the UC Davis campus! </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 37: </td> <td> Line 37: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- ''A questions about this page: 1) Can we break it down anymore? It's kind of a lot of information to read at once 2) Should the page be named ["T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)"]? ["Tai Chi"] can redirect here, and anyone searching for "Tai Chi" will end up here.'' -- ["arlenabraham" arlen]<br> - <br> - <br> - ''arlen, I agree - there is too much technical information for the casual reader - that belongs in wikipedia, it's not Davis-specific'' -- wertperch</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2005-11-16 16:23:54KevinWeedonToo much "technical" information. <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> By use of the words "Tai Chi", most people actually mean "<span>["</span>T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)"<span>]"</span>, or possibly <span>"[</span>"T'ai-Chi (Taiji)"<span>]"</span>. </td> <td> <span>+</span> By use of the words "Tai Chi", most people actually mean "T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)", or possibly "T'ai-Chi (Taiji)". </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 5: </td> <td> Line 5: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- "Tai Chi" is an unfortunate, "lazy", common vernacular English usage. It is meant as a Romanization (i.e. using the common modern English alphabet that is derived from the Latin language or Roman alphabet), -- as a transliteration from the Mandarin Chinese language into English writing. But, to undiscriminatingly just write "Tai Chi" can lead to significant and unnecessary confusion. Unfortunately, unknowingly, whole books have been published in English incorporating this confusion!</span> </td> <td> <span>+ Usually, "Tai Chi" is used when actually only some particular aspect of "T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)", -- the highly disciplined, extensive and varied, so called "internal" martial practices are meant, or when only one of the various specific "Styles" of the Martial Arts that go by that name are meant. Some of the most common "Family Styles" of "T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)" are "Chen Style", "Yang Style" (pronounced with a short "aa" sound; and where "Yang" here has nothing to do with the "Yang" in the "Yin/Yang Symbol"), "Wu Style", and "Sun Style" (pronounced with a short "uu" sound).<br> + </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 7: </td> <td> Line 8: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- Usually, "Tai Chi" is used when actually only some particular aspect of "["T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)"]", -- the highly disciplined, extensive and varied, so called "internal" martial practices are meant, or when only one of the various specific "Styles" of the Martial Arts that go by that name are meant. Some of the most common "Family Styles" of "["T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)"]" are "["Chen Style"]", "["Yang Style"]" (pronounced with a short "aa" sound; and where "Yang" here has nothing to do with the "Yang" in the "["Yin/Yang Symbol"]"), "["Wu Style"]", and "["Sun Style"]" (pronounced with a short "uu" sound).<br> - Sometimes, though rarely, "Tai Chi" is used when actually "["T'ai-Chi (Taiji)"]", -- the Taoist (Daoist) symbol is meant (what in English is usually referred to as the "Yin/Yang" Symbol, -- which also is not quite correct usage, as it is misleading as to the actual conceptual Taoist meaning for that symbol). <br> - <br> - Why is it misleading to use the term written as just "Tai Chi" instead of "["T'ai-Chi (Taiji)"]"? Because it leads to misunderstanding and confusion, as it inadvertantly "fuses" the notion of "["chi(ji)"]" with the notion of "["ch'i(qi)"]". In this context, by "["chi(ji)"]" is meant the notion what "ultimately actually" occurs, as opposed to what might have been pre-conceived as eventually occuring, or as opposed to what might be remembered as having already occured, -- that is, it refers to the actual reality of an event, not the pre-conception or remembrance. Whereas, with "ch'i(qi)" one is possibly refering to "air", or "wind", or "ambiance", or "energy", or "vital energy", -- depending on the context of use of that word. They, "["chi(ji)"]" versus "["ch'i(qi)"]", literaly have nothing to do with each other; they are unrelated. These two Chinese "words", or really parts of "words", are totally unrelated to each other, both as to their meaning as much as they are totally unrelated as to their Chinese calligraphy. <br> - <br> - The "confusion" between "["chi(ji)"]" and "["ch'i(qi)"]" only arises out of a copy-cat "laziness" (i.e someone unknowingly drops that little apostrophe " ' ", or also the dash " - " in "T'ai-Chi", and everyone else copies this), as if they were not there for a reason! Or, more likely, the "confusion" arises simply out of an understandable ignorance of the actual original Chinese words, and/or possibly out of a lack of understanding of what that little apostrophe " ' " is for (it prescribes an "unvoiced" or plosive versus a "voiced" sound), combined with the uninformed presumption that things that look somewhat similar are actually meant to be the same!<br> - <br> - The truth of the matter is that "chi(ji)" and "ch'i(qi)" are not one and the same, -- not in their meaning, not in their calligraphy, not in their phonetics, not even in their tones ["chi(ji)", rising tone; "ch'i(qi)", dropping tone], -- and they ought to not be so confused! Yet they are, even by educated people that ought to know better. For example, published in the United States, ... even published by reputable publishers, ... there is more than one book written about "Tai Chi" where quite clearly the author knows not that the "Chi" in "Tai Chi" [T'ai-Chi (Taiji)] is not at all "exactly" the same as the "chi" in "chi kung" [ch'i kung (qigong)]! That is sadly misleading. <br> - <br> - So, it is "["T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)"]" that we ought to be writing about: that is any one of a variety of styles of Chinese "internal" Martial Arts that go by that name, ... that is about any of their various disciplined and varied practices, -- that is for example a meditation, or a meditation "in motion", or yet more importantly a meditation "on function", -- and, it si "["T'ai-Chi (Taiji)"]" which is regarded by some as a way of life, and possibly by some as an "ultimate" way of life.<br> - <br> - There is not enough space on this page to give a full background, so the genuine seeker will look to the sources of the philosophy, at the least as refered to in [wiki:WikiPedia:Tao_Te_Ching Tao Te Ching] and the [wiki:WikiPedia:I_Ching I Ching], both of which are connected with Taoism (Daoism), a Chinese philosophical system.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ If you are interested in learning more, look to the sources of the philosophy, at the least as refered to in [wiki:WikiPedia:Tao_Te_Ching Tao Te Ching] and the [wiki:WikiPedia:I_Ching I Ching], both of which are connected with Taoism (Daoism), a Chinese philosophical system.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2005-11-16 05:56:08KevinWeedon <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 48: </td> <td> Line 48: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + <br> + ''arlen, I agree - there is too much technical information for the casual reader - that belongs in wikipedia, it's not Davis-specific'' -- wertperch</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2005-11-12 13:11:03DanielQuincy <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 5: </td> <td> Line 5: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> "Tai Chi" is an unfortunate, "lazy", common vernacular English usage. It is meant as a Romanization (i.e. using the common modern English alphabet that is derived from the Latin language or Roman alphabet), -- as a transliteration from the Mandarin Chinese language. But, to undiscriminatingly just write "Tai Chi" can lead to significant and unnecessary confusion. Unfortunately, unknowingly, whole books have been published in English incorporating this confusion! </td> <td> <span>+</span> "Tai Chi" is an unfortunate, "lazy", common vernacular English usage. It is meant as a Romanization (i.e. using the common modern English alphabet that is derived from the Latin language or Roman alphabet), -- as a transliteration from the Mandarin Chinese language<span>&nbsp;into English writing</span>. But, to undiscriminatingly just write "Tai Chi" can lead to significant and unnecessary confusion. Unfortunately, unknowingly, whole books have been published in English incorporating this confusion! </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2005-11-12 13:09:24DanielQuincy <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 10: </td> <td> Line 10: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Why is it misleading to use the term written as just "Tai Chi" instead of "["T'ai-Chi (Taiji)"]"? Because it leads to misunderstanding and confusion, as it inadvertantly "fuses" the notion of "["chi(ji)"]" with the notion of "["ch'i(qi)"]". In this context, by "["chi(ji)"]" is meant the notion what "ultimately actually" occurs, as opposed to what might have been pre-conceived as eventually occuring, or as opposed to what might be remembered as having already occured, -- that is, it refers to the actual reality of an event, not the pre-conception or remembrance. Whereas, with "ch'i(qi)" one is possibly refering to <span>air, or wind, or </span>ambiance<span>, or energy, or </span>vital energy, -- depending on the context of use of that word. They<span>&nbsp;literaly ha</span>ve nothing to do with each other; they are unrelated. These two Chinese "words", or really parts of "words", are totally unrelated to each other, both as to their meaning as much as they are totally unrelated as to their Chinese calligraphy. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Why is it misleading to use the term written as just "Tai Chi" instead of "["T'ai-Chi (Taiji)"]"? Because it leads to misunderstanding and confusion, as it inadvertantly "fuses" the notion of "["chi(ji)"]" with the notion of "["ch'i(qi)"]". In this context, by "["chi(ji)"]" is meant the notion what "ultimately actually" occurs, as opposed to what might have been pre-conceived as eventually occuring, or as opposed to what might be remembered as having already occured, -- that is, it refers to the actual reality of an event, not the pre-conception or remembrance. Whereas, with "ch'i(qi)" one is possibly refering to <span>"air", or "wind", or "</span>ambiance<span>", or "energy", or "</span>vital energy<span>"</span>, -- depending on the context of use of that word. They<span>, "["chi(ji)"]" </span>ve<span>rsus "["ch'i(qi)"]", literaly have</span> nothing to do with each other; they are unrelated. These two Chinese "words", or really parts of "words", are totally unrelated to each other, both as to their meaning as much as they are totally unrelated as to their Chinese calligraphy. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2005-11-12 13:03:21DanielQuincy <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 40: </td> <td> Line 40: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ Downtown in the City of Davis, California instruction is available through the ["Aikido Institute Davis"].<br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2005-11-12 12:57:59DanielQuincy <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- "Tai Chi" is an unfortunate, "lazy", common vernacular English transliteration from the Chinese language, one that can lead to significant and unnecessary confusion (whole books have been published incorporating this confusion!).</span> </td> <td> <span>+ By use of the words "Tai Chi", most people actually mean "["T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)"]", or possibly "["T'ai-Chi (Taiji)"]".</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 5: </td> <td> Line 5: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- Usually, "Tai Chi" is used when actually some aspect of "["T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)"]", -- the highly disciplined "internal" martial practices are meant, or when one of the various "Styles" of Martial Art that go by that name are meant.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ "Tai Chi" is an unfortunate, "lazy", common vernacular English usage. It is meant as a Romanization (i.e. using the common modern English alphabet that is derived from the Latin language or Roman alphabet), -- as a transliteration from the Mandarin Chinese language. But, to undiscriminatingly just write "Tai Chi" can lead to significant and unnecessary confusion. Unfortunately, unknowingly, whole books have been published in English incorporating this confusion!</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 7: </td> <td> Line 7: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- Sometimes, though rarely, "Tai Chi" is used when "["T'ai-Chi (Taiji)"]", -- the Taoist (Daoist) symbol is meant (what in English is usually referred to as the "Yin/Yang" Symbol, -- which also is not quite correct usage, as it is misleading as to the actual conceptual Taoist meaning for that symbol). </span> </td> <td> <span>+ Usually, "Tai Chi" is used when actually only some particular aspect of "["T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)"]", -- the highly disciplined, extensive and varied, so called "internal" martial practices are meant, or when only one of the various specific "Styles" of the Martial Arts that go by that name are meant. Some of the most common "Family Styles" of "["T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)"]" are "["Chen Style"]", "["Yang Style"]" (pronounced with a short "aa" sound; and where "Yang" here has nothing to do with the "Yang" in the "["Yin/Yang Symbol"]"), "["Wu Style"]", and "["Sun Style"]" (pronounced with a short "uu" sound).<br> + Sometimes, though rarely, "Tai Chi" is used when actually "["T'ai-Chi (Taiji)"]", -- the Taoist (Daoist) symbol is meant (what in English is usually referred to as the "Yin/Yang" Symbol, -- which also is not quite correct usage, as it is misleading as to the actual conceptual Taoist meaning for that symbol). </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 9: </td> <td> Line 10: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- "Tai Chi" is unfortunate usage because it leads to misunderstanding and confusion, as it inadvertantly "fuses" the notion of "chi(ji)" (what "ultimately actually" occurs, as opposed to what might have been pre-conceived, or as opposed to what might be remembered) with the notion of "ch'i(qi)" (air, wind, ambiance, energy, vital energy, -- depending on the context), -- which Chinese words are totally unrelated to each other, both as to their meaning as much as they are totally unrelated as to their Chinese calligraphy. The "confusion" arises out of a copy-cat "laziness" (i.e dropping that little apostrophe " ' ", or the dash " - ", as if they were not there for a reason), or more likely simply out of an understandable ignorance of the actual original Chinese words, and possibly out of the uninformed presumption that things that look somewhat similar are actually meant to be the same!</span> </td> <td> <span>+ Why is it misleading to use the term written as just "Tai Chi" instead of "["T'ai-Chi (Taiji)"]"? Because it leads to misunderstanding and confusion, as it inadvertantly "fuses" the notion of "["chi(ji)"]" with the notion of "["ch'i(qi)"]". In this context, by "["chi(ji)"]" is meant the notion what "ultimately actually" occurs, as opposed to what might have been pre-conceived as eventually occuring, or as opposed to what might be remembered as having already occured, -- that is, it refers to the actual reality of an event, not the pre-conception or remembrance. Whereas, with "ch'i(qi)" one is possibly refering to air, or wind, or ambiance, or energy, or vital energy, -- depending on the context of use of that word. They literaly have nothing to do with each other; they are unrelated. These two Chinese "words", or really parts of "words", are totally unrelated to each other, both as to their meaning as much as they are totally unrelated as to their Chinese calligraphy. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 11: </td> <td> Line 12: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- The truth of the matter is that "chi(ji)" and "ch'i(qi)" are not one and the same, -- not in their meaning, not in their calligraphy, not in their phonetics, not even in their tones ["chi(ji)", rising tone; "ch'i(qi)", dropping tone], -- and they ought to not be so confused! Yet, published in the United States, ... published by reputable publishers, ... there is more than one book written about "Tai Chi" where quite clearly the author knows not that the "Chi" in "Tai Chi" [T'ai-Chi (Taiji)] is not at all "exactly" the same as the "chi" in "chi kung" [ch'i kung (qigong)].</span> </td> <td> <span>+ The "confusion" between "["chi(ji)"]" and "["ch'i(qi)"]" only arises out of a copy-cat "laziness" (i.e someone unknowingly drops that little apostrophe " ' ", or also the dash " - " in "T'ai-Chi", and everyone else copies this), as if they were not there for a reason! Or, more likely, the "confusion" arises simply out of an understandable ignorance of the actual original Chinese words, and/or possibly out of a lack of understanding of what that little apostrophe " ' " is for (it prescribes an "unvoiced" or plosive versus a "voiced" sound), combined with the uninformed presumption that things that look somewhat similar are actually meant to be the same!</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 13: </td> <td> Line 14: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- So, it is "["T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)"]" that is any one of a variety of styles of Chinese "internal" Martial Arts that go by that name, that is about any of their various disciplined practices, -- that is for example a meditation, a meditation "in motion", but more importantly a meditation "on function", -- and, which is regarded by some as a way of life, and possibly by some as an "ultimate" way of life.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ The truth of the matter is that "chi(ji)" and "ch'i(qi)" are not one and the same, -- not in their meaning, not in their calligraphy, not in their phonetics, not even in their tones ["chi(ji)", rising tone; "ch'i(qi)", dropping tone], -- and they ought to not be so confused! Yet they are, even by educated people that ought to know better. For example, published in the United States, ... even published by reputable publishers, ... there is more than one book written about "Tai Chi" where quite clearly the author knows not that the "Chi" in "Tai Chi" [T'ai-Chi (Taiji)] is not at all "exactly" the same as the "chi" in "chi kung" [ch'i kung (qigong)]! That is sadly misleading. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 15: </td> <td> Line 16: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- Because there is clearly not enough space here to give a deal of background, the genuine seeker will look to the sources of the philosophy, namely the [wiki:WikiPedia:Tao_Te_Ching Tao Te Ching] and the [wiki:WikiPedia:I_Ching I Ching], both of which are connected with Taoism, a Chinese philosophical system.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ So, it is "["T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)"]" that we ought to be writing about: that is any one of a variety of styles of Chinese "internal" Martial Arts that go by that name, ... that is about any of their various disciplined and varied practices, -- that is for example a meditation, or a meditation "in motion", or yet more importantly a meditation "on function", -- and, it si "["T'ai-Chi (Taiji)"]" which is regarded by some as a way of life, and possibly by some as an "ultimate" way of life.<br> + <br> + There is not enough space on this page to give a full background, so the genuine seeker will look to the sources of the philosophy, at the least as refered to in [wiki:WikiPedia:Tao_Te_Ching Tao Te Ching] and the [wiki:WikiPedia:I_Ching I Ching], both of which are connected with Taoism (Daoism), a Chinese philosophical system.</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 19: </td> <td> Line 22: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> == T'ai-Chi Ch'uan in Davis == </td> <td> <span>+</span> == T'ai-Chi Ch'uan in Davis<span>, California</span> == </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 21: </td> <td> Line 24: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> "["T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)"]" is(are) a Martial Art(s) and system of exercises and practices done by many throughout the World, <span>norm</span>ally under the guidance of a<span>&nbsp;master.</span> In Davis, there are a few groups offering <span>guidance, including the</span> undergraduate and graduate student ["Tai Chi Club at UC Davis"], the ["ARC<span>&nbsp;Martial Arts Program"],</span> the ["ARC Wellness Program"], the ["Experimental College"] (EC courses #201 &amp; #202)<span>&nbsp;and the ["Aikido Institute</span> Davis<span>"] - these include a series o</span>f<span>&nbsp;courses on the UC Davis ["campus"], led by</span> Jim Clingingsmith<span>&nbsp;and by Daniel </span>Qu<span>incy: <br> - *</span> S<span>ifu Jim Clingingsmith's</span> course (EC#202) runs every weekday at the rear of the ["Silo"] Building, near the ["Craft Center"], at 06:00 A.M. - he's a good master and always welcoming to new students. <br> <span>-</span> * Sifu Daniel Quincy's courses (EC#201-1,..., and others) are taught at various times of the day, -- including: <br> <span>-</span> * at Sunrise ~ 7 A.M. (Tues. &amp; Thurs, at the Eucalyptus Grove, North of ["Mann Lab"]; and Weds, at the Intramural Field by 'A' &amp; 3rd Streets); <br> <span>-</span> * mornings 11 A.M. (Tues &amp; Thurs) <span>in</span> the ["ARC" Group Exercise Room; <br> <span>-</span> * at Noon (12:10-12:50 P.M., Tues in the ["Sciences Laboratory Building" SciLab] &amp; ["Briggs Hall" Briggs] "Triangle", and Thurs in the area East of Chem.194); <br> <span>-</span> * afternoons (3:20-4:50 P.M., Tues &amp; Weds <span>in</span> the ["ARC Martial Arts Room"]); and, <br> <span>-</span> * evenings (5:20-6:30 P.M. Tues &amp; Weds, &amp; 7:30-8:50 P.M. Tues, by the ["Surge IV"] Buildings, -- in Fall &amp; Winter on the Surge IV central deck area, in Spring &amp; Summer on the field So. of Surge IV; and also some Fridays 6:30-7:50 P.M. <span>in</span> the ["ARC Martial Arts Room"]). </td> <td> <span>+</span> "["T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)"]" is(are) a Martial Art(s) and system of exercises and practices done by many throughout the World, <span>usu</span>ally under the guidance of a<span>n experienced and knowledgable teacher, or master of that art. </span> In Davis, there are <span>quite </span>a few<span>&nbsp;teachers and</span> groups offering <span>classes, courses and guidance, both on the University of California (UC) Davis campus, as well as in the City of Davis.<br> + <br> + At UC Davis there are many opportunities for obtaining quality instruction, including <br> + * through the ["SPAC"]</span> undergraduate and graduate student ["Tai Chi Club at UC Davis"],<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;+ * at</span> the ["ARC<span>"] through</span> the ["ARC <span>Martial Arts Program"] and the ["ARC </span>Wellness Program"],<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;+ * through</span> the ["Experimental College"] (EC courses #201 &amp; #202)<span>.<br> + These include a series of courses on the UC</span> Davis<span>&nbsp;["campus"], led by Jim Clingingsmith (["Quan Ping Style"]) and by Daniel Quincy (["Yang Style"]): <br> + * Si</span>f<span>u</span> Jim Clingingsmith<span>'s ["</span>Qu<span>an Ping</span> S<span>tyle"]</span> course (EC#202) runs every weekday at the rear of the ["Silo"] Building, near the ["Craft Center"], at 06:00 A.M. - he's a good master and always welcoming to new students. <br> <span>+</span> * Sifu Daniel Quincy's<span>&nbsp;["Yang Style"]</span> courses (EC#201-1,..., and others) are taught at various times of the day, -- including: <br> <span>+</span> * at Sunrise ~ 7 A.M. (Tues. &amp; Thurs, at the <span>["</span>Eucalyptus Grove<span>"]</span>, North of ["Mann Lab"]; and Weds, at the <span>["</span>Intramural <span>(IM) </span>Field<span>"]</span> by 'A' &amp; 3rd Streets); <br> <span>+</span> * mornings 11<span>-12</span> A.M. (Tues &amp; Thurs) <span>at</span> the ["ARC"<span>] in the ["ARC</span> Group Exercise Room<span>"]</span>; <br> <span>+</span> * at Noon (12:10-12:50 P.M., <span>on </span>Tues in the ["Sciences Laboratory Building" SciLab] &amp; ["Briggs Hall" Briggs] "Triangle", and <span>on </span>Thurs in the area East of <span>["</span>Chem.194<span>"]</span>); <br> <span>+</span> * afternoons (3:20-4:50 P.M., Tues &amp; Weds <span>at</span> the ["ARC<span>"] in the ["ARC</span> Martial Arts Room"]); and, <br> <span>+</span> * evenings (5:20-6:30 P.M. Tues &amp; Weds, &amp; 7:30-8:50 P.M. Tues, by the ["Surge IV"] Buildings, -- in Fall &amp; Winter on the <span>["</span>Surge IV<span>"]</span> central deck area, in Spring &amp; Summer on the field So. of <span>["</span>Surge IV<span>"]</span>; and also some Fridays 6:30-7:50 P.M. <span>at</span> the ["ARC<span>"] in the ["ARC</span> Martial Arts Room"]). </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2005-11-12 10:17:58ArlenAbrahamcleanup, question <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> "Tai Chi" is an unfortunate, "lazy", common vernacular English transliteration from the Chinese language, one that can lead to significant and unnecessary confusion (whole books have been published incorporating this confusion!).<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><br> <span>-</span> Usually, "Tai Chi" is used when actually some aspect of "["T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)"]", -- the highly disciplined "internal" martial practices are meant, or when one of the various "Styles" of Martial Art that go by that name are meant.<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span> </td> <td> <span>+ == Background ==<br> + <br> +</span> "Tai Chi" is an unfortunate, "lazy", common vernacular English transliteration from the Chinese language, one that can lead to significant and unnecessary confusion (whole books have been published incorporating this confusion!).<br> <span>+ <br> +</span> Usually, "Tai Chi" is used when actually some aspect of "["T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)"]", -- the highly disciplined "internal" martial practices are meant, or when one of the various "Styles" of Martial Art that go by that name are meant.<span><br> + </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 5: </td> <td> Line 9: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> "Tai Chi" is unfortunate usage because it leads to misunderstanding and confusion, as it inadvertantly "fuses" the notion of "chi(ji)" (what "ultimately actually" occurs, as opposed to what might have been pre-conceived, or as opposed to what might be remembered) with the notion of "ch'i(qi)" (air, wind, ambiance, energy, vital energy, -- depending on the context), -- <span>&nbsp;</span>which Chinese words are totally unrelated to each other, both as to their meaning as much as they are totally unrelated as to their Chinese calligraphy. The "confusion" arises out of a copy-cat "laziness" (i.e dropping that little apostrophe " ' ", or the dash " - ", as if they were not there for a reason), or more likely simply out of an understandable ignorance of the actual original Chinese words, and possibly out of the uninformed presumption that things that look somewhat similar are actually meant to be the same!<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> "Tai Chi" is unfortunate usage because it leads to misunderstanding and confusion, as it inadvertantly "fuses" the notion of "chi(ji)" (what "ultimately actually" occurs, as opposed to what might have been pre-conceived, or as opposed to what might be remembered) with the notion of "ch'i(qi)" (air, wind, ambiance, energy, vital energy, -- depending on the context), -- which Chinese words are totally unrelated to each other, both as to their meaning as much as they are totally unrelated as to their Chinese calligraphy. The "confusion" arises out of a copy-cat "laziness" (i.e dropping that little apostrophe " ' ", or the dash " - ", as if they were not there for a reason), or more likely simply out of an understandable ignorance of the actual original Chinese words, and possibly out of the uninformed presumption that things that look somewhat similar are actually meant to be the same! </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 11: </td> <td> Line 15: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Because there is clearly not enough space here to give a deal of background, the genuine seeker will look to the sources of the philosophy, namely the [<span>http</span>:<span>//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/</span>Tao_Te_Ching Tao Te Ching] and the [<span>http</span>:<span>//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/</span>I_Ching I Ching], both of which are connected with Taoism, a Chinese philosophical system. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Because there is clearly not enough space here to give a deal of background, the genuine seeker will look to the sources of the philosophy, namely the [<span>wiki</span>:<span>WikiPedia:</span>Tao_Te_Ching Tao Te Ching] and the [<span>wiki</span>:<span>WikiPedia:</span>I_Ching I Ching], both of which are connected with Taoism, a Chinese philosophical system. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 13: </td> <td> Line 17: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- There are several major "Styles" and many schools of "["T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)"]", and many methods ("forms") of practicing it. The Wikipedia article on [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tai_Chi_Chuan Tai Chi Chuan] is definitely worthy of a read.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ There are several major "Styles" and many schools of "["T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)"]", and many methods ("forms") of practicing it. The Wikipedia article on [wiki:WikiPedia:Tai_Chi_Chuan Tai Chi Chuan] is definitely worthy of a read.</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 15: </td> <td> Line 19: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> - "["T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)"]" is(are) a Martial Art(s) and system of exercises and practices done by many throughout the World, normally under the guidance of a master. In Davis, there are a few groups offering guidance, including the undergraduate and graduate student ["Tai Chi Club at UC Davis"], the ["ARC Martial Arts Program"], the ["ARC Wellness Program"], the ["Experimental College"] (EC courses #201 &amp; #202) and the ["Aikido Institute Davis"] - these include a series of courses on the UC Davis campus, led by Jim Clingingsmith and by Daniel Quincy: <br> <span>- **</span>* Sifu Jim Clingingsmith's course (EC#202) runs every weekday at the rear of the Silo Building, near the Craft Center, at 06:00 A.M. - he's a good master and always welcoming to new students. <br> <span>- **</span>* Sifu Daniel Quincy's courses (EC#201-1,..., and others) are taught at various times of the day, -- including: <br> <span>-</span> * at Sunrise ~ 7 A.M. (Tues. &amp; Thurs, at the Eucalyptus Grove, North of Mann Lab; and Weds, at the Intramural Field by 'A' &amp; 3rd Streets); <br> <span>-</span> * mornings 11 A.M. (Tues &amp; Thurs) in the ARC Group Exercise Room; <br> <span>-</span> * at Noon (12:10-12:50 P.M., Tues in the SciLab &amp; Briggs "Triangle", and Thurs in the area East of Chem.194); </td> <td> <span>+ == T'ai</span>-<span>Chi Ch'uan in Davis ==<br> + <br> +</span> "["T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)"]" is(are) a Martial Art(s) and system of exercises and practices done by many throughout the World, normally under the guidance of a master. In Davis, there are a few groups offering guidance, including the undergraduate and graduate student ["Tai Chi Club at UC Davis"], the ["ARC Martial Arts Program"], the ["ARC Wellness Program"], the ["Experimental College"] (EC courses #201 &amp; #202) and the ["Aikido Institute Davis"] - these include a series of courses on the UC Davis <span>["</span>campus<span>"]</span>, led by Jim Clingingsmith and by Daniel Quincy: <br> <span>+ </span>* Sifu Jim Clingingsmith's course (EC#202) runs every weekday at the rear of the <span>["</span>Silo<span>"]</span> Building, near the <span>["</span>Craft Center<span>"]</span>, at 06:00 A.M. - he's a good master and always welcoming to new students. <br> <span>+ </span>* Sifu Daniel Quincy's courses (EC#201-1,..., and others) are taught at various times of the day, -- including: <br> <span>+</span> * at Sunrise ~ 7 A.M. (Tues. &amp; Thurs, at the Eucalyptus Grove, North of <span>["</span>Mann Lab<span>"]</span>; and Weds, at the Intramural Field by 'A' &amp; 3rd Streets); <br> <span>+</span> * mornings 11 A.M. (Tues &amp; Thurs) in the <span>["</span>ARC<span>"</span> Group Exercise Room; <br> <span>+</span> * at Noon (12:10-12:50 P.M., Tues in the <span>["</span>Sci<span>ences </span>Lab<span>oratory Building" SciLab]</span> &amp; <span>["</span>Briggs<span>&nbsp;Hall" Briggs]</span> "Triangle", and Thurs in the area East of Chem.194); </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 22: </td> <td> Line 28: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * evenings (5:20-6:30 P.M. Tues &amp; Weds, &amp; 7:30-8:50 P.M. Tues, by the Surge IV Buildings, -- in Fall &amp; Winter on the Surge IV central deck area, in Spring &amp; Summer on the field So. of Surge IV; and also some Fridays 6:30-7:50 P.M. in the ["ARC Martial Arts Room"]). </td> <td> <span>+</span> * evenings (5:20-6:30 P.M. Tues &amp; Weds, &amp; 7:30-8:50 P.M. Tues, by the <span>["</span>Surge IV<span>"]</span> Buildings, -- in Fall &amp; Winter on the Surge IV central deck area, in Spring &amp; Summer on the field So. of Surge IV; and also some Fridays 6:30-7:50 P.M. in the ["ARC Martial Arts Room"]). </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 29: </td> <td> Line 35: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + ''A questions about this page: 1) Can we break it down anymore? It's kind of a lot of information to read at once 2) Should the page be named ["T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)"]? ["Tai Chi"] can redirect here, and anyone searching for "Tai Chi" will end up here.'' -- ["arlenabraham" arlen]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2005-11-12 08:42:26DanielQuincy <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- Tai Chi is a martial art, a meditation and a way of life.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ "Tai Chi" is an unfortunate, "lazy", common vernacular English transliteration from the Chinese language, one that can lead to significant and unnecessary confusion (whole books have been published incorporating this confusion!). <br> + Usually, "Tai Chi" is used when actually some aspect of "["T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)"]", -- the highly disciplined "internal" martial practices are meant, or when one of the various "Styles" of Martial Art that go by that name are meant. <br> + Sometimes, though rarely, "Tai Chi" is used when "["T'ai-Chi (Taiji)"]", -- the Taoist (Daoist) symbol is meant (what in English is usually referred to as the "Yin/Yang" Symbol, -- which also is not quite correct usage, as it is misleading as to the actual conceptual Taoist meaning for that symbol). <br> + <br> + "Tai Chi" is unfortunate usage because it leads to misunderstanding and confusion, as it inadvertantly "fuses" the notion of "chi(ji)" (what "ultimately actually" occurs, as opposed to what might have been pre-conceived, or as opposed to what might be remembered) with the notion of "ch'i(qi)" (air, wind, ambiance, energy, vital energy, -- depending on the context), -- which Chinese words are totally unrelated to each other, both as to their meaning as much as they are totally unrelated as to their Chinese calligraphy. The "confusion" arises out of a copy-cat "laziness" (i.e dropping that little apostrophe " ' ", or the dash " - ", as if they were not there for a reason), or more likely simply out of an understandable ignorance of the actual original Chinese words, and possibly out of the uninformed presumption that things that look somewhat similar are actually meant to be the same! <br> + <br> + The truth of the matter is that "chi(ji)" and "ch'i(qi)" are not one and the same, -- not in their meaning, not in their calligraphy, not in their phonetics, not even in their tones ["chi(ji)", rising tone; "ch'i(qi)", dropping tone], -- and they ought to not be so confused! Yet, published in the United States, ... published by reputable publishers, ... there is more than one book written about "Tai Chi" where quite clearly the author knows not that the "Chi" in "Tai Chi" [T'ai-Chi (Taiji)] is not at all "exactly" the same as the "chi" in "chi kung" [ch'i kung (qigong)].<br> + <br> + So, it is "["T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)"]" that is any one of a variety of styles of Chinese "internal" Martial Arts that go by that name, that is about any of their various disciplined practices, -- that is for example a meditation, a meditation "in motion", but more importantly a meditation "on function", -- and, which is regarded by some as a way of life, and possibly by some as an "ultimate" way of life.</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 5: </td> <td> Line 13: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> -<span>&nbsp;There are several schools of Tai Chi</span>, and many methods ("forms") of practicing it. The Wikipedia article on [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tai_Chi_Chuan Tai Chi Chuan] is definitely worthy of a read. </td> <td> <span>+ There are several major "Styles" and many schools of "["T'ai</span>-<span>Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)"]"</span>, and many methods ("forms") of practicing it. <span>&nbsp;</span>The Wikipedia article on [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tai_Chi_Chuan Tai Chi Chuan] is definitely worthy of a read. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 7: </td> <td> Line 15: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- Tai Chi as an art and exercise form is practiced by many, normally under the guidance of a master. In Davis, there are a few groups offering guidance, including the ["Experimental College"] and the ["Aikido Institute Davis"] - there are two courses, led by Jim Clingingsmith and Daniel Quincy. Jim's runs every weekday at the rear of the Silo, near the Craft Center, at 0600 - he's a good master and always welcoming to new students.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ "["T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)"]" is(are) a Martial Art(s) and system of exercises and practices done by many throughout the World, normally under the guidance of a master. In Davis, there are a few groups offering guidance, including the undergraduate and graduate student ["Tai Chi Club at UC Davis"], the ["ARC Martial Arts Program"], the ["ARC Wellness Program"], the ["Experimental College"] (EC courses #201 &amp; #202) and the ["Aikido Institute Davis"] - these include a series of courses on the UC Davis campus, led by Jim Clingingsmith and by Daniel Quincy: <br> + *** Sifu Jim Clingingsmith's course (EC#202) runs every weekday at the rear of the Silo Building, near the Craft Center, at 06:00 A.M. - he's a good master and always welcoming to new students. <br> + *** Sifu Daniel Quincy's courses (EC#201-1,..., and others) are taught at various times of the day, -- including: <br> + * at Sunrise ~ 7 A.M. (Tues. &amp; Thurs, at the Eucalyptus Grove, North of Mann Lab; and Weds, at the Intramural Field by 'A' &amp; 3rd Streets); <br> + * mornings 11 A.M. (Tues &amp; Thurs) in the ARC Group Exercise Room; <br> + * at Noon (12:10-12:50 P.M., Tues in the SciLab &amp; Briggs "Triangle", and Thurs in the area East of Chem.194); <br> + * afternoons (3:20-4:50 P.M., Tues &amp; Weds in the ["ARC Martial Arts Room"]); and, <br> + * evenings (5:20-6:30 P.M. Tues &amp; Weds, &amp; 7:30-8:50 P.M. Tues, by the Surge IV Buildings, -- in Fall &amp; Winter on the Surge IV central deck area, in Spring &amp; Summer on the field So. of Surge IV; and also some Fridays 6:30-7:50 P.M. in the ["ARC Martial Arts Room"]). <br> + There sure are lots of opportunities to do great ["T'ai-Chi Ch'uan (Taijiquan)"] on the UC Davis campus! <br> + <br> + In the above comments regarding the use of the term "Tai Chi" the following words are in the standard English written Romanization transliteration of the Mandarin Chinese words (i.e. the ["Wade-Giles system"]): <br> + "chi", "ch'i", "ch'i kung", "T'ai-Chi", "T'ai-Chi Ch'uan"; <br> + and the equivalent words in the standard mainland Chinese Mandarin Romanization transliteration of the Mandarin Chinese (i.e. the ["Pin-Yin system"]) are:<br> + "ji", "qi", "qigong", "Taiji", "Taijiquan".</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2005-11-09 15:11:02KevinWeedon <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 7: </td> <td> Line 7: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Tai Chi as an art and exercise form is practiced by many, normally under the guidance of a master. In Davis, there are a few groups offering guidance, including the ["Experimental College"] and the ["Aikido Institute Davis"] - there are two courses, led by Jim Clingingsmith and Daniel Quincy<span>&nbsp;Sifu</span>. Jim's runs every weekday at the rear of the Silo, near the Craft Center, at 0600. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Tai Chi as an art and exercise form is practiced by many, normally under the guidance of a master. In Davis, there are a few groups offering guidance, including the ["Experimental College"] and the ["Aikido Institute Davis"] - there are two courses, led by Jim Clingingsmith and Daniel Quincy. Jim's runs every weekday at the rear of the Silo, near the Craft Center, at 0600<span>&nbsp;- he's a good master and always welcoming to new students</span>. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tai Chihttp://daviswiki.org/Tai_Chi2005-11-03 20:00:12KevinWeedon <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tai Chi<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ Tai Chi is a martial art, a meditation and a way of life.<br> + <br> + Because there is clearly not enough space here to give a deal of background, the genuine seeker will look to the sources of the philosophy, namely the [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tao_Te_Ching Tao Te Ching] and the [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I_Ching I Ching], both of which are connected with Taoism, a Chinese philosophical system.<br> + <br> + There are several schools of Tai Chi, and many methods ("forms") of practicing it. The Wikipedia article on [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tai_Chi_Chuan Tai Chi Chuan] is definitely worthy of a read.<br> + <br> + Tai Chi as an art and exercise form is practiced by many, normally under the guidance of a master. In Davis, there are a few groups offering guidance, including the ["Experimental College"] and the ["Aikido Institute Davis"] - there are two courses, led by Jim Clingingsmith and Daniel Quincy Sifu. Jim's runs every weekday at the rear of the Silo, near the Craft Center, at 0600.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div>