Recent Changes for "Tipping" - Davis Wikihttp://daviswiki.org/TippingRecent Changes of the page "Tipping" on Davis Wiki.en-us Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2011-08-07 13:19:57NikhilDahalJust a few thoughts <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 70: </td> <td> Line 70: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ *I have a friend who is a delivery driver, and he says that anything over $5 is exceptional.</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 76: </td> <td> Line 77: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ *The Downtown Starbucks location does NOT have a 'tip' option when you pay by credit card, that really makes me mad, since I usually use a credit card. But if I have an extra few dollars I usually tip a dollar per drink.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2011-06-16 11:34:10JabberWokkyNot terribly worried; I routinely tip way above 20%, but I never thought of this <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 64: </td> <td> Line 64: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * Interesting. I always tip on the non-discounted value of the meal -- if I have a coupon or if the meal is free for some reason, I always tip as if I paid for the full price. Happy hour specials, however, I've always seen the same as lunch specials: the figure given is the stated menu price. Does anybody tip for a lunch special at the price for the full dinner entree?<br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2011-06-16 10:43:22CovertProfessor <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 79: </td> <td> Line 79: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * I have tipped owners before. I've never been turned down, and I've always been thanked. --["Users/CovertProfessor"]</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 84: </td> <td> Line 85: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * I always tip on tax, usually 15% or a little more. --["Users/CovertProfessor"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2011-06-16 09:49:09MattHhadding section on tipping on tax <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 82: </td> <td> Line 82: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ =Tipping on Tax=<br> + It is standard practice to not tip on tax. However, sometimes its just easiest to calculate the percentage of the total bill. Techniques like doubling the tax inherently are not tipping on the tax.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2011-06-08 17:05:17NikhilDahalAdded a comment to "tipping an owner" <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 78: </td> <td> Line 78: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- </span> </td> <td> <span>+ * I was talking with a friend the other day, and he is from Southern California and he works at a restaurant just like I do, and we were talking, and he was saying how his manager would wait tables etc. to help out the waiters/waitresses. -- ["Users/NikhilDahal"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2010-05-25 20:31:06WilliamLewis(quick edit) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 73: </td> <td> Line 73: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * [http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/cgi-bin/displaycode?section=lab&amp;group=00001-01000&amp;file=350-356 It is illegal for Safeway to take their employees' tips].</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2010-05-25 20:13:42MaxLucasSafeway baristas <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 72: </td> <td> Line 72: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * Baristas at Safeway Starbucks cafes are Safeway employees and are forbidden from accepting tips. If they are given tips, they are required to put the money into the cash register as property of Safeway. Pocketing tip money would get them fired. --["Users/MaxLucas"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2010-05-25 20:02:19hankim <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 79: </td> <td> Line 79: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * I usually leave a few dollars for the people cleaning up at a standard buffet (sort of different at the sushi buffets with the tip jars for those making rolls for you on demand though). I do not think it is standard to leave tips at most buffets though since I usually take a look around and nobody else leaves cash on the table. --["Users/hankim"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2008-07-20 02:00:04MaryLieth <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> '''[wiki:WikiPedia:Tipping]''' is an important part of ["restaurants" restaurant] etiquette and is certainly a sensitive topic. Tipping behavior can be confusing to recent immigrants and can be confusing to students who are just beginning to patronize ["upscale restaurants"] on their own or are going to ["bars"] for the first time. This page presents guidelines you can follow or ignore, but by reading it you will at least get the local business and consumer perspectives. Many <span>students</span> in Davis rely on tips for their livelihood, so you can think of tipping as supporting higher education. Note that this page is about gratuities. You may be looking for ["Cow Tipping"], as the rates at which bovines get tipped vary from region to region. Unlike humans, bovines prefer to get tipped 0%. </td> <td> <span>+</span> '''[wiki:WikiPedia:Tipping]''' is an important part of ["restaurants" restaurant] etiquette and is certainly a sensitive topic. Tipping behavior can be confusing to recent immigrants and can be confusing to students who are just beginning to patronize ["upscale restaurants"] on their own or are going to ["bars"] for the first time. This page presents guidelines you can follow or ignore, but by reading it you will at least get the local business and consumer perspectives. Many <span>["students"]</span> in Davis rely on tips for their livelihood, so you can think of tipping as supporting higher education. Note that this page is about gratuities. You may be looking for ["Cow Tipping"], as the rates at which bovines get tipped vary from region to region. Unlike humans, bovines prefer to get tipped 0%. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 6: </td> <td> Line 6: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> The rule-of-thumb is that one should give a ''minimum'' tip of 15%, which is approximately double the tax. Others feel it should be less for poor service and more for excellent service. In some countries, tipping is never done. Many establishments have all the workers pool their tips, and then divy them out again. Some industries have grown to expect tips (restaurants, hotel staff, etc.), yet other industries rarely get tips. Some think this is unfair. </td> <td> <span>+</span> The rule-of-thumb is that one should give a ''minimum'' tip of 15%, which is approximately double the tax. Others feel it should be less for poor service and more for excellent service. In some countries, tipping is never done. Many establishments have all the workers pool their tips, and then div<span>v</span>y them out again. Some industries have grown to expect tips (restaurants, hotel staff, etc.), yet other industries rarely get tips. Some think this is unfair. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 8: </td> <td> Line 8: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> The state of California is generally respectful of employees rights, and provides a number of tipping related [http://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/FAQ_TipsAndGratutities.htm legal guidelines]. Independent of tips, all workers must receive minimum wage. Many (especially those who work in service industries) like this system because some can make a substantial income from tips. </td> <td> <span>+</span> The state of <span>["</span>California<span>"]</span> is generally respectful of employees rights, and provides a number of tipping related [http://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/FAQ_TipsAndGratutities.htm legal guidelines]. Independent of tips, all workers must receive minimum wage. Many (especially those who work in service industries) like this system because some can make a substantial income from tips. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 14: </td> <td> Line 14: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * If the service is excellent (refills are assumed and brought out in new glasses before I'm done with the drink I'm working on, food arrives hot and fresh, server comes back to make sure everything is alright) then I tip 20-25%. If the service is truly exeptional (bringing extras without being asked, being extra on-the-ball) I have been known to tip between 75-100% because it is exceptionally rare. </td> <td> <span>+</span> * If the service is excellent (refills are assumed and brought out in new glasses before I'm done with the drink I'm working on, food arrives hot and fresh, server comes back to make sure everything is alright) then I tip 20-25%. If the service is truly ex<span>c</span>eptional (bringing extras without being asked, being extra on-the-ball) I have been known to tip between 75-100% because it is exceptionally rare. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 17: </td> <td> Line 17: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * If the service was just terrible (extra charges for things I feel should have been free - like water, takes a long time to get seated and a long time to get the order taken even when the rest<span>e</span>raunt is visibly slow, etc) I do not tip at all and I leave a note saying why if I didn't get a chance to tell the server in person. </td> <td> <span>+</span> * If the service was just terrible (extra charges for things I feel should have been free - like water, takes a long time to get seated and a long time to get the order taken even when the rest<span>a</span>raunt is visibly slow, etc) I do not tip at all and I leave a note saying why if I didn't get a chance to tell the server in person. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 21: </td> <td> Line 21: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> I consider the Tip to be a feedback mechanism. If I routinely tip the same amount, the server will never get any feedback. If I tip the same amount and give verbal feedback, the server will not listen because they know they get tipped the same amount anyway. Consequently, money speaks. --["DomenicSantangelo"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> I consider the Tip to be a feedback mechanism. If I routinely tip the same amount, the server will never get any feedback. If I tip the same amount and give verbal feedback, the server will not listen because they know they get tipped the same amount anyway. Consequently, money speaks. --["<span>Users/</span>DomenicSantangelo"] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 23: </td> <td> Line 23: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * Some of these things (such as extras, how refills are handled, and extra charges) may be restaurant policy rather than good or bad service on the part of the individual server. Do you take this into account when determining the tip? --["JessicaLuedtke"]<br> <span>-</span> * Policy is policy. I believe that it's the server's responsibility to make those policies as transparent to me as possible. You might notice as a worker (assume retail/service for the sake of discussion) that policies and procedures - P&amp;P to the initiated - are often on the forefront of your mind. But as a customer, what do you think when an employee tells you, "that's our policy"? I think, "I don't give a rat's ass WHAT your policies are. Take care of me however you have to and get me out of here." Thus, policy isn't as important as the way the server handles the situation. Take refills for example. My preference for a moderately priced restaurant is that the server refill soft drinks by bringing me a new one, in a new glass, before I finish the first one. Let's say policy dictates the the server has to give refills in the same glass (gross?). That's fine, just don't make me eat my ice before you come refill me! Extra charges -- as I said in my ["Mustard Seed"] comment, service was terrible there. Partly it's because she offered "ice water, sparkling water, or bottled water?" before we even sat. Sparkling sounded nice. It also cost like $9, a fact we hadn't been offered. I generally don't care what crap costs, just ''tell me''. Her service was just straight sleazy, right out of the car salesman's book. &lt;/rant&gt; --["DomenicSantangelo"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> * Some of these things (such as extras, how refills are handled, and extra charges) may be restaurant policy rather than good or bad service on the part of the individual server. Do you take this into account when determining the tip? --["<span>Users/</span>JessicaLuedtke"]<br> <span>+</span> * Policy is policy. I believe that it's the server's responsibility to make those policies as transparent to me as possible. You might notice as a worker (assume retail/service for the sake of discussion) that policies and procedures - P&amp;P to the initiated - are often on the forefront of your mind. But as a customer, what do you think when an employee tells you, "that's our policy"? I think, "I don't give a rat's ass WHAT your policies are. Take care of me however you have to and get me out of here." Thus, policy isn't as important as the way the server handles the situation. Take refills for example. My preference for a moderately priced restaurant is that the server refill soft drinks by bringing me a new one, in a new glass, before I finish the first one. Let's say policy dictates the the server has to give refills in the same glass (gross?). That's fine, just don't make me eat my ice before you come refill me! Extra charges -- as I said in my ["Mustard Seed"] comment, service was terrible there. Partly it's because she offered "ice water, sparkling water, or bottled water?" before we even sat. Sparkling sounded nice. It also cost like $9, a fact we hadn't been offered. I generally don't care what crap costs, just ''tell me''. Her service was just straight sleazy, right out of the car salesman's book. &lt;/rant&gt; --["<span>Users/</span>DomenicSantangelo"] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 26: </td> <td> Line 26: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ''2007-01-28 18:12:21'' [[nbsp]] I tip based on quality of service. I judge the quality to my personal standards and leave what I think is an accurate. Hell I tip on Shirley Temples, which is a soda with grenadine, it still comes from a bartender so I tip. I can't wait to go to a non tipping country and tip. --["StevenDaubert"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> ''2007-01-28 18:12:21'' [[nbsp]] I tip based on quality of service. I judge the quality to my personal standards and leave what I think is an accurate. Hell I tip on Shirley Temples, which is a soda with grenadine, it still comes from a bartender so I tip. I can't wait to go to a non tipping country and tip. --["<span>Users/</span>StevenDaubert"] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 30: </td> <td> Line 30: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> I have a handy card that shows 15% and 20% for all whole numbers between $1 and $100. I always tip 15%, but I'll sometimes give 20% on what looks like a really busy day, especially if the waiter handles the extra work relatively well. --["TerryCliff"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> I have a handy card that shows 15% and 20% for all whole numbers between $1 and $100. I always tip 15%, but I'll sometimes give 20% on what looks like a really busy day, especially if the waiter handles the extra work relatively well. --["<span>Users/</span>TerryCliff"] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 35: </td> <td> Line 35: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> I think this is a reasonable policy. First, 15% gratuity is the rockbottom minimum tip you should give provided the waitstaff doesn't majorly screw up. Second, most waitstaff get paid peanuts by the restaurant, and make their money primarily from tips. The 15% surcharge guarantees that the waitstaff get just compensation for a particularly heavy workload. If you disagree with these policies, you have these options (1) eat at McDonalds, (2) go to a foreign country where the waitstaff get decent salaries and never receive tips, (3) complain to restaurant owners and tell them to raise the salaries of the waitstaff-- by simply holding back a tip, you're focusing your annoyance at the wrong people. That is, you exploit workers who are already exploited by their management. As for the 15% gratuity charge, if you feel that your party of 8 or more has not received adequate service, you're well within your right to complain to the management. Any restaurant in their right mind will waive the charge. Remember, you're the consumer and a restaurant would rather calm an upset customer than have their reputation smeared. ["CraigBrozinsky"]<br> <span>-</span> * Yay! Well said. ["JeffSpeckles"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> I think this is a reasonable policy. First, 15% gratuity is the rockbottom minimum tip you should give provided the waitstaff doesn't majorly screw up. Second, most waitstaff get paid peanuts by the restaurant, and make their money primarily from tips. The 15% surcharge guarantees that the waitstaff get just compensation for a particularly heavy workload. If you disagree with these policies, you have these options (1) eat at McDonalds, (2) go to a foreign country where the waitstaff get decent salaries and never receive tips, (3) complain to restaurant owners and tell them to raise the salaries of the waitstaff-- by simply holding back a tip, you're focusing your annoyance at the wrong people. That is, you exploit workers who are already exploited by their management. As for the 15% gratuity charge, if you feel that your party of 8 or more has not received adequate service, you're well within your right to complain to the management. Any restaurant in their right mind will waive the charge. Remember, you're the consumer and a restaurant would rather calm an upset customer than have their reputation smeared. ["<span>Users/</span>CraigBrozinsky"]<br> <span>+</span> * Yay! Well said. ["<span>Users/</span>JeffSpeckles"] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 38: </td> <td> Line 38: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> If such policies were not in place the server would make less money than if the party weren't there. A big top takes more time to manage as a server, and the other tables in his/her section can suffer because of it, probably costing the server additional tips. Large groups are usually not paid for by a single individual, so in many groups there will usually be the one person in the group who will contribute less than their fair share. As a result a server would get a smaller tip because of the cheapskate in the group. A server is very likely to get more money off of 2 four tops than a single eight top. --["RogerClark"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> If such policies were not in place the server would make less money than if the party weren't there. A big top takes more time to manage as a server, and the other tables in his/her section can suffer because of it, probably costing the server additional tips. Large groups are usually not paid for by a single individual, so in many groups there will usually be the one person in the group who will contribute less than their fair share. As a result a server would get a smaller tip because of the cheapskate in the group. A server is very likely to get more money off of 2 four tops than a single eight top. --["<span>Users/</span>RogerClark"] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 40: </td> <td> Line 40: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> OK, my observation is on the poor comparison. A mechanic is paid for the parts AND the labor as 2 separate charges. At a restaurant food and service are combined into a single charge and are not as easy to separate. The other issue is that mechanics charge around $70-75/hr for labor. While that labor rate covers overhead as well as wages, I am sure a mechanic doesn't work for minimum wage. - ["RogerClark"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> OK, my observation is on the poor comparison. A mechanic is paid for the parts AND the labor as 2 separate charges. At a restaurant food and service are combined into a single charge and are not as easy to separate. The other issue is that mechanics charge around $70-75/hr for labor. While that labor rate covers overhead as well as wages, I am sure a mechanic doesn't work for minimum wage. - ["<span>Users/</span>RogerClark"] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 42: </td> <td> Line 42: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Fixed gratuities for parties of 8 or more are used because quite often a waiter will be servicing only one table if it is 8 or more. no tip or a small tip could mean thats all they get for the night. tips are often taken into account when calculating how much a waiter makes in salary. to the comment that they are already making a wad of money for having you eat there, the gratuity never goes to the restaurant but actually goes to the waiter. this practice usually is only reserved for upscale places. usually i tip well and if there is decent service 15% is less than what i give. my revenge is that if they put the charge I don't add the extra 3% i would normally give. -["MattHh"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> Fixed gratuities for parties of 8 or more are used because quite often a waiter will be servicing only one table if it is 8 or more. no tip or a small tip could mean thats all they get for the night. tips are often taken into account when calculating how much a waiter makes in salary. to the comment that they are already making a wad of money for having you eat there, the gratuity never goes to the restaurant but actually goes to the waiter. this practice usually is only reserved for upscale places. usually i tip well and if there is decent service 15% is less than what i give. my revenge is that if they put the charge I don't add the extra 3% i would normally give. -["<span>Users/</span>MattHh"] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 49: </td> <td> Line 49: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> I typically leave an extra buck per drink. depending upon the place and the service. if it is a really nice place, I typically leave less. Though when loaded I have left lots more. --["rocksanddirt"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> I typically leave an extra buck per drink. depending upon the place and the service. if it is a really nice place, I typically leave less. Though when loaded I have left lots more. --["<span>Users/</span>rocksanddirt"] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 53: </td> <td> Line 53: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> I understand that tipping is completely optional. I get the whole "we should be happy about getting any tip in the first place," logic. There are always going to be people that don't tip, its part of the industry. My suggestions above should generally get you standard service in most places. I always tip more than that,(usually a couple bucks a beer, and $3-$5 on the more intricate stuff) but I'm biased so I won't attempt to argue that this should be the standard. Although I, of course, think it should be. Whats unique about bars as opposed to other service industry occupations is that the tip doesn't usually end the experience. Most times you will be coming back up to bar for additional beverages. Consequently, your tipping is noticed whether it be bad or good. If good, the service gets quicker, the drinks get stronger, and sometimes free drinks "appear." If bad or nonexistent, it starts to take longer each time and you get looked over. As a matter of pride I never short-pour a drink (less booze) because of tipping, but it does happen. If you leave a waiter a bad tip, chances are you won't see them again for a while, but when you leave a bartender a bad one they see you again much sooner. You would be surprised how much quicker your getting served when your leaving 2 or more dollars a drink. My point is that tipping in a bar can be very beneficial to the customer. If your not a good tipper or don't believe in it thats fine, just don't be surprised about the level of service you receive. A convincing argument could be made that service should be standard whether you tip or not. But that will never be the case, its too uneconomical. Serve more people that tip, make more money. I'm not saying that the its justifiable for the level of service to drop drastically (it does happen) but there will always be a decline in service at a bar if your a bad tipper. Personal feelings on your rights to tip or not tip don't matter, your current economical situation doesn't matter, if you tip its rewarded if you don't things can take a turn for the worse. ["jarrettnoble"]<br> <span>-</span> * in general, it sounds like you always give more than 20% per drink. how do your tips work if a cocktail server takes your order, and does tipping the waitress mean the bartender doesn't get the tip, or is that usually split? ["CraigBrozinsky"]<br> <span>-</span> * Craig, cocktail servers (not always female) usually "tip out" the bartenders at the end of their shift. The exact amount varies, of course, but it is typically 10-15% of their tips. I usually sit at the bar proper to drink, or order myself, but if I were to have cocktail service I'd upgrade the tip accordingly. --["JeffSpeckles"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> I understand that tipping is completely optional. I get the whole "we should be happy about getting any tip in the first place," logic. There are always going to be people that don't tip, its part of the industry. My suggestions above should generally get you standard service in most places. I always tip more than that,(usually a couple bucks a beer, and $3-$5 on the more intricate stuff) but I'm biased so I won't attempt to argue that this should be the standard. Although I, of course, think it should be. Whats unique about bars as opposed to other service industry occupations is that the tip doesn't usually end the experience. Most times you will be coming back up to bar for additional beverages. Consequently, your tipping is noticed whether it be bad or good. If good, the service gets quicker, the drinks get stronger, and sometimes free drinks "appear." If bad or nonexistent, it starts to take longer each time and you get looked over. As a matter of pride I never short-pour a drink (less booze) because of tipping, but it does happen. If you leave a waiter a bad tip, chances are you won't see them again for a while, but when you leave a bartender a bad one they see you again much sooner. You would be surprised how much quicker your getting served when your leaving 2 or more dollars a drink. My point is that tipping in a bar can be very beneficial to the customer. If your not a good tipper or don't believe in it thats fine, just don't be surprised about the level of service you receive. A convincing argument could be made that service should be standard whether you tip or not. But that will never be the case, its too uneconomical. Serve more people that tip, make more money. I'm not saying that the its justifiable for the level of service to drop drastically (it does happen) but there will always be a decline in service at a bar if your a bad tipper. Personal feelings on your rights to tip or not tip don't matter, your current economical situation doesn't matter, if you tip its rewarded if you don't things can take a turn for the worse. ["<span>Users/</span>jarrettnoble"]<br> <span>+</span> * in general, it sounds like you always give more than 20% per drink. how do your tips work if a cocktail server takes your order, and does tipping the waitress mean the bartender doesn't get the tip, or is that usually split? ["<span>Users/</span>CraigBrozinsky"]<br> <span>+</span> * Craig, cocktail servers (not always female) usually "tip out" the bartenders at the end of their shift. The exact amount varies, of course, but it is typically 10-15% of their tips. I usually sit at the bar proper to drink, or order myself, but if I were to have cocktail service I'd upgrade the tip accordingly. --["<span>Users/</span>JeffSpeckles"] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 57: </td> <td> Line 57: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Thanks! Also, how much should you tip a server at a restaurant if you bought an expensive wine? For example, if you like to tip 20% for food, get $100 worth of food and two $50 bottles of wine ($200 bill). --["CraigBrozinsky"]<br> <span>-</span> * I worked for a few places in Napa a while back and usually most wait staff or bartenders expected the addition of wine to be incorporated into the total bill before gratuity percentage is calculated. I can understand how this can become very expensive and honestly its not a very hard task. From your example I would maybe tip 8-10% on the cost of the wine and probably end up leaving $30 total. But its not uncommon for people to leave a 5% tip on the alcohol. If you drank that much in cocktail's I would tip more because more work is involved. One thing to consider is when a server closes out at the end of a shift, total sales reflect alcohol as well. In some restaurants the servers tip out the hostess, busser, expo, bartender, and kitchen a percentage from sales as opposed to a percentage of total tips earned. Although we are able to split food and alcohol totals at Sophia's, some places don't do that. Therefore, the server could sometimes be tipping out more because their sales have been inflated by the alcohol cost. From a bartending perspective if I was tipped $10 on opening two bottles of wine I would be very happy. Its really up to you and how satisfied you are from spending $200 (hopefully you are for that much.) Some people tip the total bill, some people don't. I can understand both sides, but personally lean towards tipping more, but I am biased. ["jarrettnoble"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> Thanks! Also, how much should you tip a server at a restaurant if you bought an expensive wine? For example, if you like to tip 20% for food, get $100 worth of food and two $50 bottles of wine ($200 bill). --["<span>Users/</span>CraigBrozinsky"]<br> <span>+</span> * I worked for a few places in Napa a while back and usually most wait staff or bartenders expected the addition of wine to be incorporated into the total bill before gratuity percentage is calculated. I can understand how this can become very expensive and honestly its not a very hard task. From your example I would maybe tip 8-10% on the cost of the wine and probably end up leaving $30 total. But its not uncommon for people to leave a 5% tip on the alcohol. If you drank that much in cocktail's I would tip more because more work is involved. One thing to consider is when a server closes out at the end of a shift, total sales reflect alcohol as well. In some restaurants the servers tip out the hostess, busser, expo, bartender, and kitchen a percentage from sales as opposed to a percentage of total tips earned. Although we are able to split food and alcohol totals at Sophia's, some places don't do that. Therefore, the server could sometimes be tipping out more because their sales have been inflated by the alcohol cost. From a bartending perspective if I was tipped $10 on opening two bottles of wine I would be very happy. Its really up to you and how satisfied you are from spending $200 (hopefully you are for that much.) Some people tip the total bill, some people don't. I can understand both sides, but personally lean towards tipping more, but I am biased. ["<span>Users/</span>jarrettnoble"] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 66: </td> <td> Line 66: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * ''If there is a delivery charge already included, do you still tip?'' -- ["JoAnnaRich" JR] </td> <td> <span>+</span> * ''If there is a delivery charge already included, do you still tip?'' -- ["<span>Users/</span>JoAnnaRich" JR] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 70: </td> <td> Line 70: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Question: If you plan on tipping a barista with change, like $5 for a $4.50 mocha, should you wait till she gives you the change and put it in the cup, or tell her to keep the change? --["ApolloStumpy"]<br> <span>-</span> * I wouldn't say "keep the change" unless I'm paying with a $20 or something. I think it sounds kind of mean to say "keep the change" to $0.50. I usually just take the change and dump it in the tipjar, or hand them the money and walk away if I'm leaving the change as a tip. --["DomenicSantangelo"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> Question: If you plan on tipping a barista with change, like $5 for a $4.50 mocha, should you wait till she gives you the change and put it in the cup, or tell her to keep the change? --["<span>Users/</span>ApolloStumpy"]<br> <span>+</span> * I wouldn't say "keep the change" unless I'm paying with a $20 or something. I think it sounds kind of mean to say "keep the change" to $0.50. I usually just take the change and dump it in the tipjar, or hand them the money and walk away if I'm leaving the change as a tip. --["<span>Users/</span>DomenicSantangelo"] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 74: </td> <td> Line 74: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * What if the person serving you IS the owner? For example, the ["University Haircutters" barber in the basement], John Salido -- he's a very nice man and an excellent barber, but I feel weird tipping him because he's the owner and thus all the money goes to him anyway.. and I probably need the money more than him. -["KrisFricke"]<br> <span>-</span> *It's a bad assumption to say that because someone owns a business, they are well off. Also, most of the companies fixed costs (ie. rent, utilities, equipment, supplies) are still present despite lack of employees. So to say that "all of the money goes to him anyway" is far from the truth. I think if you're pleased with your service from a business owner, that's all the more reason to tip, because they are solely responsible for your good experience, and they work hard to give it. -- ["PeterAnselmo"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> * What if the person serving you IS the owner? For example, the ["University Haircutters" barber in the basement], John Salido -- he's a very nice man and an excellent barber, but I feel weird tipping him because he's the owner and thus all the money goes to him anyway.. and I probably need the money more than him. -["<span>Users/</span>KrisFricke"]<br> <span>+</span> *It's a bad assumption to say that because someone owns a business, they are well off. Also, most of the companies fixed costs (ie. rent, utilities, equipment, supplies) are still present despite lack of employees. So to say that "all of the money goes to him anyway" is far from the truth. I think if you're pleased with your service from a business owner, that's all the more reason to tip, because they are solely responsible for your good experience, and they work hard to give it. -- ["<span>Users/</span>PeterAnselmo"] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 78: </td> <td> Line 78: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * What is the standard tipping practice during a buffet? Dim sum service? or other non-traditional sit down meals? I assume a buffet would be less, because there is less service. Dim sum might be somewhere in between the standard service and the buffet. What are people's thoughts? --["MattHh"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> * What is the standard tipping practice during a buffet? Dim sum service? or other non-traditional sit down meals? I assume a buffet would be less, because there is less service. Dim sum might be somewhere in between the standard service and the buffet. What are people's thoughts? --["<span>Users/</span>MattHh"] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 86: </td> <td> Line 86: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> The wikizens are merely trying to create a forum for the eternal question on when a tip (if any) is appropriate and at what percentage that tip should be. As long as people tip in Davis and there are people to receive these tips there will be relevance to tipping in the community. ["jarrettnoble"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> The wikizens are merely trying to create a forum for the eternal question on when a tip (if any) is appropriate and at what percentage that tip should be. As long as people tip in Davis and there are people to receive these tips there will be relevance to tipping in the community. ["<span>Users/</span>jarrettnoble"] </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2008-02-03 21:10:54MattHh <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 77: </td> <td> Line 77: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> =Tipping During a<span>t</span> Non-Traditional Meal Service<span>s</span>= </td> <td> <span>+</span> =Tipping During a Non-Traditional Meal Service= </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2008-02-03 21:10:20MattHhtipping during a buffet? <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 77: </td> <td> Line 77: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ =Tipping During at Non-Traditional Meal Services=<br> + * What is the standard tipping practice during a buffet? Dim sum service? or other non-traditional sit down meals? I assume a buffet would be less, because there is less service. Dim sum might be somewhere in between the standard service and the buffet. What are people's thoughts? --["MattHh"]<br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2008-02-03 20:32:58TerryCliff <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 29: </td> <td> Line 29: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ------<br> + I have a handy card that shows 15% and 20% for all whole numbers between $1 and $100. I always tip 15%, but I'll sometimes give 20% on what looks like a really busy day, especially if the waiter handles the extra work relatively well. --["TerryCliff"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-12-23 20:56:15JasonAllerSpelling <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 14: </td> <td> Line 14: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> *If the service is excellent (refills are assumed and brought out in new glasses before I'm done with the drink I'm working on, food arrives hot and fresh, server comes back to make sure everything is alright) then I tip 20-25%. If the service is truly exeptional (bringing extras without being asked, being extra on-the-ball) I have been known to tip between 75-100% because it is exceptionally rare.<br> <span>-</span> *If I have no complaints about service (everything came out in a timely manner, server asked to refill drinks appropriately) then I double the tax and round up.<br> <span>-</span> *If the service was bad (no drink refills, no 'how is everything?', food comes out slowly with no update from the server), I drop the tip WAY down, usually to about 5%.<br> - <span>&nbsp;*If the service was just terrible (extra charges for things I feel should have been free - </span>like water, takes a long time to get seated and a long time to get the order taken even when the resteraunt is visibly slow, etc) I do not tip at all and I leave a note saying why if I didn't get a chance to tell the server in person. </td> <td> <span>+</span> *<span>&nbsp;</span>If the service is excellent (refills are assumed and brought out in new glasses before I'm done with the drink I'm working on, food arrives hot and fresh, server comes back to make sure everything is alright) then I tip 20-25%. If the service is truly exeptional (bringing extras without being asked, being extra on-the-ball) I have been known to tip between 75-100% because it is exceptionally rare.<br> <span>+</span> *<span>&nbsp;</span>If I have no complaints about service (everything came out in a timely manner, server asked to refill drinks appropriately) then I double the tax and round up.<br> <span>+</span> *<span>&nbsp;</span>If the service was bad (no drink refills, no 'how is everything?', food comes out slowly with no update from the server), I drop the tip WAY down, usually to about 5%.<br> <span>+ * If the service was just terrible (extra charges for things I feel should have been free </span>- like water, takes a long time to get seated and a long time to get the order taken even when the resteraunt is visibly slow, etc) I do not tip at all and I leave a note saying why if I didn't get a chance to tell the server in person. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 26: </td> <td> Line 26: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ''2007-01-28 18:12:21'' [[nbsp]] I tip based on quality of service. I judge the quality to my personal standards and leave what I think is an accurate. Hell I tip on Shirly Temples, which is a soda with grenadine, it still comes from a bartender so I tip. I can't wait to go to a non tipping country and tip. --["StevenDaubert"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> ''2007-01-28 18:12:21'' [[nbsp]] I tip based on quality of service. I judge the quality to my personal standards and leave what I think is an accurate. Hell I tip on Shirl<span>e</span>y Temples, which is a soda with grenadine, it still comes from a bartender so I tip. I can't wait to go to a non tipping country and tip. --["StevenDaubert"] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 33: </td> <td> Line 33: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> I think this is a reasonable policy. First, 15% gratuity is the rockbottom minimum tip you should give provided the waitstaff doesn't majorly screw up. Second, most waitstaff get paid peanuts by the restaurant, and make their money primarily from tips. The 15% surcharge guarantees that the waitstaff get just compensation for a particularly heavy workload. If you disagree with these policies, you have these options (1) eat at McDonalds, (2) go to a foreign country where the waitstaff get decent salaries and never rec<span>ie</span>ve tips, (3) complain to restaurant owners and tell them to raise the salaries of the waitstaff-- by simply holding back a tip, you're focus<span>s</span>ing your annoyance at the wrong people. That is, you exploit workers who are already exploited by their management. As for the 15% gratuity charge, if you feel that your party of 8 or more has not received adequate service, you're well within your right to complain to the management. Any restaurant in their right mind will waive the charge. Remember, you're the consumer and a restaurant would rather calm an upset customer than have their reputation smeared. ["CraigBrozinsky"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> I think this is a reasonable policy. First, 15% gratuity is the rockbottom minimum tip you should give provided the waitstaff doesn't majorly screw up. Second, most waitstaff get paid peanuts by the restaurant, and make their money primarily from tips. The 15% surcharge guarantees that the waitstaff get just compensation for a particularly heavy workload. If you disagree with these policies, you have these options (1) eat at McDonalds, (2) go to a foreign country where the waitstaff get decent salaries and never rec<span>ei</span>ve tips, (3) complain to restaurant owners and tell them to raise the salaries of the waitstaff-- by simply holding back a tip, you're focusing your annoyance at the wrong people. That is, you exploit workers who are already exploited by their management. As for the 15% gratuity charge, if you feel that your party of 8 or more has not received adequate service, you're well within your right to complain to the management. Any restaurant in their right mind will waive the charge. Remember, you're the consumer and a restaurant would rather calm an upset customer than have their reputation smeared. ["CraigBrozinsky"] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 40: </td> <td> Line 40: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Fixed gratuities for parties of 8 or more are used because quite often a waiter will be servicing only one table if it is 8 or more. no tip or a small tip could mean thats all they get for the night. tips are often taken into account when calculating how much a waiter makes in salary. to the comment that they are al<span>l</span>ready making a wad of money for having you eat there, the gratuity never goes to the rest<span>rau</span>nt but actually goes to the waiter. this practice usually is only reserved for upscale places. usually i tip well and if there is de<span>s</span>ent service 15% is less than what i give. <span>&nbsp;my revenge is that if they put the charge i dont a</span>d the extra 3% i would normally give. -["MattHh"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> Fixed gratuities for parties of 8 or more are used because quite often a waiter will be servicing only one table if it is 8 or more. no tip or a small tip could mean thats all they get for the night. tips are often taken into account when calculating how much a waiter makes in salary. to the comment that they are already making a wad of money for having you eat there, the gratuity never goes to the rest<span>aura</span>nt but actually goes to the waiter. this practice usually is only reserved for upscale places. usually i tip well and if there is de<span>c</span>ent service 15% is less than what i give. <span>my revenge is that if they put the charge I don't ad</span>d the extra 3% i would normally give. -["MattHh"] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 51: </td> <td> Line 51: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> I understand that tipping is completely optional. I get the whole "we should be happy about getting any tip in the first place," logic. There are always going to be people that don't tip, its part of the industry. My suggestions above should generally get you standard service in most places. I always tip more than that,(usually a couple bucks a beer, and $3-$5 on the more intricate stuff) but I'm biased so I won't attempt to argue that this should be the standard. Although I, of course, think it should be. Whats unique about bars as opposed to other service industry occupations is that the tip doesn't usually end the experience. Most times you will be coming back up to bar for additional beverages. Consequently, your tipping is noticed whether it be bad or good. If good, the service gets quicker, the drinks get stronger, and sometimes free drinks "appear." If bad or nonexistent, it starts to take longer each time and you get looked over. As a matter of pride I never short-pour a drink (less booze) because of tipping, but it does happen. If you leave a waiter a bad tip, chances are you won't see them again for a while, but when you leave a bartender a bad one they see you again much sooner. You would be suprised how much quicker your getting served when your leaving 2 or more dollars a drink. My point is that tipping in a bar can be very beneficial to the customer. If your not a good tipper or don't believe in it thats fine, just don't be su<span>prised about the level of service you recie</span>ve. A convincing argument could be made that service should be standard whether you tip or not. But that will never be the case, its too uneconomical. Serve more people that tip, make more money. I'm not saying that the its justifiable for the level of service to drop drastically (it does happen) but there will always be a decline in service at a bar if your a bad tipper. Personal feelings on your rights to tip or not tip don't matter, your current economical situation doesn't matter, if you tip its rewarded if you don't things can take a turn for the worse. ["jarrettnoble"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> I understand that tipping is completely optional. I get the whole "we should be happy about getting any tip in the first place," logic. There are always going to be people that don't tip, its part of the industry. My suggestions above should generally get you standard service in most places. I always tip more than that,(usually a couple bucks a beer, and $3-$5 on the more intricate stuff) but I'm biased so I won't attempt to argue that this should be the standard. Although I, of course, think it should be. Whats unique about bars as opposed to other service industry occupations is that the tip doesn't usually end the experience. Most times you will be coming back up to bar for additional beverages. Consequently, your tipping is noticed whether it be bad or good. If good, the service gets quicker, the drinks get stronger, and sometimes free drinks "appear." If bad or nonexistent, it starts to take longer each time and you get looked over. As a matter of pride I never short-pour a drink (less booze) because of tipping, but it does happen. If you leave a waiter a bad tip, chances are you won't see them again for a while, but when you leave a bartender a bad one they see you again much sooner. You would be su<span>r</span>prised how much quicker your getting served when your leaving 2 or more dollars a drink. My point is that tipping in a bar can be very beneficial to the customer. If your not a good tipper or don't believe in it thats fine, just don't be su<span>rprised about the level of service you recei</span>ve. A convincing argument could be made that service should be standard whether you tip or not. But that will never be the case, its too uneconomical. Serve more people that tip, make more money. I'm not saying that the its justifiable for the level of service to drop drastically (it does happen) but there will always be a decline in service at a bar if your a bad tipper. Personal feelings on your rights to tip or not tip don't matter, your current economical situation doesn't matter, if you tip its rewarded if you don't things can take a turn for the worse. ["jarrettnoble"] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 77: </td> <td> Line 77: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> This page does have relevance to the community. Many <span>d</span>avis residents work in service industry jobs where tipping is involved. Furthermore, I would venture a guess that about 99% of the <span>davis community are involved in interactions where tipping would be approp</span>iate. Relevance measures a document's applicability to a given subject or query. </td> <td> <span>+</span> This page does have relevance to the community. Many <span>D</span>avis residents work in service industry jobs where tipping is involved. Furthermore, I would venture a guess that about 99% of the <span>Davis community are involved in interactions where tipping would be appropr</span>iate. Relevance measures a document's applicability to a given subject or query. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 79: </td> <td> Line 79: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> - Any community members inquiry on tipping in relation to other objects within the community creates applicablity </td> <td> <span>+</span> - Any community members inquiry on tipping in relation to other objects within the community creates applicab<span>i</span>lity </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 81: </td> <td> Line 81: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> The wikizens are merely trying to create a forum for the e<span>n</span>ternal question on when a tip (if any) is appropiate and at what percentage that tip should be. As long as people tip in d<span>avis and there are people to recie</span>ve these tips there will be relevance to tipping in the community. ["jarrettnoble"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> The wikizens are merely trying to create a forum for the eternal question on when a tip (if any) is approp<span>r</span>iate and at what percentage that tip should be. As long as people tip in <span>Davis an</span>d<span>&nbsp;there are people to recei</span>ve these tips there will be relevance to tipping in the community. ["jarrettnoble"] </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-07-19 23:45:39CharlesMcLaughlincomment <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- <br> - </span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 21: </td> <td> Line 19: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ------<br> + </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 27: </td> <td> Line 27: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ------<br> + I heard that the IRS taxes servers based on the assumption they're tipped 10%. So if you don't leave at least 10%, the server could actually lose money by waiting on you. In my opinion, you should always tip at least 15%. --["Users/CharlesMcLaughlin"]<br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-03-20 13:36:47JarrettNobleI figured after the editing and reorg, we could take the relevance accusation of <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- [[include(Relevance)]]</span> </td> <td> <span>+ </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-03-09 14:43:13KaiTingRevert to version 78 (delivery charge != tipping, should be (and is) mentoned on restaurant page). <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 63: </td> <td> Line 63: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- '''Places that have Delivery Charges'''<br> - * ["House of Chang"]</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-03-09 14:17:04JoAnnaRichwe should list places that have a delivery charge =) <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 63: </td> <td> Line 63: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ '''Places that have Delivery Charges'''<br> + * ["House of Chang"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-03-09 12:04:14KaiTing <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 14: </td> <td> Line 14: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- </span> </td> <td> <span>+ ------</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 25: </td> <td> Line 25: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ------<br> + ''2007-01-28 18:12:21'' [[nbsp]] I tip based on quality of service. I judge the quality to my personal standards and leave what I think is an accurate. Hell I tip on Shirly Temples, which is a soda with grenadine, it still comes from a bartender so I tip. I can't wait to go to a non tipping country and tip. --["StevenDaubert"]</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 29: </td> <td> Line 31: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> <span><br> -</span> Yay! Well said. ["JeffSpeckles"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> <span>&nbsp;*</span> Yay! Well said. ["JeffSpeckles"] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 37: </td> <td> Line 38: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ------</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 40: </td> <td> Line 42: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> =Tipping <span>F</span>or Drinks= </td> <td> <span>+</span> =Tipping <span>f</span>or Drinks= </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 43: </td> <td> Line 45: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- </span> </td> <td> <span>+ ------</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 48: </td> <td> Line 50: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- --</span>Craig, cocktail servers (not always female) usually "tip out" the bartenders at the end of their shift. The exact amount varies, of course, but it is typically 10-15% of their tips. I usually sit at the bar proper to drink, or order myself, but if I were to have cocktail service I'd upgrade the tip accordingly. --["JeffSpeckles"]<br> <span>- *</span> Thanks! Also, how much should you tip a server at a restaurant if you bought an expensive wine? For example, if you like to tip 20% for food, get $100 worth of food and two $50 bottles of wine ($200 bill). --["CraigBrozinsky"] </td> <td> <span>+ * </span>Craig, cocktail servers (not always female) usually "tip out" the bartenders at the end of their shift. The exact amount varies, of course, but it is typically 10-15% of their tips. I usually sit at the bar proper to drink, or order myself, but if I were to have cocktail service I'd upgrade the tip accordingly. --["JeffSpeckles"]<br> <span>+ ------<br> +</span> Thanks! Also, how much should you tip a server at a restaurant if you bought an expensive wine? For example, if you like to tip 20% for food, get $100 worth of food and two $50 bottles of wine ($200 bill). --["CraigBrozinsky"] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 52: </td> <td> Line 55: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> =Tipping <span>O</span>n Discounted Items= </td> <td> <span>+</span> =Tipping <span>o</span>n Discounted Items= </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 58: </td> <td> Line 61: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * ''If there is a delivery charge already included, do you still tip?'' -- ["JoAnnaRich" JR]<br> <span>-</span> * Back when I worked at a pizza place, the buck they charged for delivery was to pay for the driver's gas expenses. So I guess it technically went to the driver, but only to offset the huge cost of driving around town in his own car. The expected tip in that situation was your standard 15%. Off of most pizza orders, that's only gonna be two to four bucks. It may be a bummer to shell out the extra cash, but at least you don't have to leave the house. </td> <td> <span>+ </span> * ''If there is a delivery charge already included, do you still tip?'' -- ["JoAnnaRich" JR]<br> <span>+ </span> * Back when I worked at a pizza place, the buck they charged for delivery was to pay for the driver's gas expenses. So I guess it technically went to the driver, but only to offset the huge cost of driving around town in his own car. The expected tip in that situation was your standard 15%. Off of most pizza orders, that's only gonna be two to four bucks. It may be a bummer to shell out the extra cash, but at least you don't have to leave the house. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 61: </td> <td> Line 64: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> =Tipping a <span>b</span>arista= </td> <td> <span>+</span> =Tipping a <span>B</span>arista= </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 65: </td> <td> Line 68: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> =Tipping an <span>o</span>wner= </td> <td> <span>+</span> =Tipping an <span>O</span>wner= </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 70: </td> <td> Line 73: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- ------<br> - ''2007-01-28 18:12:21'' [[nbsp]] I tip based on quality of service. I judge the quality to my personal standards and leave what I think is an accurate. Hell I tip on Shirly Temples, which is a soda with grenadine, it still comes from a bartender so I tip. I can't wait to go to a non tipping country and tip. --["StevenDaubert"]<br> - ------<br> - ''2007-03-08 13:24:42'' [[nbsp]] Steven dop some research before tipping in a non-tipping country in some places and in some respects tipping in a country where it is not the norm can be percieved as an insult. It makes little sense to me but its true --["JarrettNoble"]<br> - ------<br> - ''2007-03-08 13:57:28'' [[nbsp]] Steven dop some research before tipping in a non-tipping country in some places and in some respects tipping in a country where it is not the norm can be percieved as an insult. It makes little sense to me but its true --["JarrettNoble"]<br> - * Perhaps this entry can be davisified by noting usual tipping habits around town, where are there tip jars, and about college students tipping habits? I mean, this is a pretty viable topic, it just shouldn't be a discussion about tipping in general, anyone want to rewrite? ~["DavePoole"]<br> - ------<br> - ''2007-03-08 14:37:51'' [[nbsp]] Half of this entry does cover that subject, it just occurs about midway through the page. I'd be happy to reorganize it and restructure some of the sentences. As amusing as it is the movie dialogue should go. --["JarrettNoble"]</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 85: </td> <td> Line 79: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- ------<br> - ''2007-03-08 16:17:51'' [[nbsp]] I tip the standard but I tip cows much more. --["GregWebb"]</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-03-09 11:51:22CraigBrozinskymore cleaning <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 25: </td> <td> Line 25: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- ----<br> - Question: If you plan on tipping a barista with change, like $5 for a $4.50 mocha, should you wait till she gives you the change and put it in the cup, or tell her to keep the change? --["ApolloStumpy"]<br> - * I wouldn't say "keep the change" unless I'm paying with a $20 or something. I think it sounds kind of mean to say "keep the change" to $0.50. I usually just take the change and dump it in the tipjar, or hand them the money and walk away if I'm leaving the change as a tip. --["DomenicSantangelo"]</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 44: </td> <td> Line 41: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- <br> - How much do you guys typically tip for drinks?</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 64: </td> <td> Line 59: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- * That's a really good question, and is one of the reasons I don't like getting things delivered. My guess is that the delivery fee goes to the owners, not to the delivery person. If that's true, you should tip. ["CraigBrozinsky"]</span> </td> <td> <span>+ * Back when I worked at a pizza place, the buck they charged for delivery was to pay for the driver's gas expenses. So I guess it technically went to the driver, but only to offset the huge cost of driving around town in his own car. The expected tip in that situation was your standard 15%. Off of most pizza orders, that's only gonna be two to four bucks. It may be a bummer to shell out the extra cash, but at least you don't have to leave the house.</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 66: </td> <td> Line 61: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- * Back when I worked at a pizza place, the buck they charged for delivery was to pay for the driver's gas expenses. So I guess it technically went to the driver, but only to offset the huge cost of driving around town in his own car. The expected tip in that situation was your standard 15%. Off of most pizza orders, that's only gonna be two to four bucks. It may be a bummer to shell out the extra cash, but at least you don't have to leave the house.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ =Tipping a barista=<br> + Question: If you plan on tipping a barista with change, like $5 for a $4.50 mocha, should you wait till she gives you the change and put it in the cup, or tell her to keep the change? --["ApolloStumpy"]<br> + * I wouldn't say "keep the change" unless I'm paying with a $20 or something. I think it sounds kind of mean to say "keep the change" to $0.50. I usually just take the change and dump it in the tipjar, or hand them the money and walk away if I'm leaving the change as a tip. --["DomenicSantangelo"]<br> + <br> + =Tipping an owner=</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-03-09 11:12:01KaiTingminor <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 28: </td> <td> Line 28: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- ----</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 61: </td> <td> Line 60: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- ----</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-03-09 11:09:11KaiTingpruned some of the stuff that REALLY isn't Davis-centric <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> '''Tipping''' is an important part of ["restaurants" restaurant] etiquette<span>, and certainly a contro</span>ve<span>rsial</span> topic. Tipping behavior can be confusing to recent immigrants<span>, and can also</span> be confusing to students who are just beginning to patronize ["upscale restaurants"] on their own or are going to ["bars"] for the first time. This page presents guidelines you can follow or ignore, but by reading it you will at least get the local business and consumer perspectives. Note that this page is about gratuities. You may be looking for ["Cow Tipping"]<span>&nbsp;as the rates</span> bovines get tipped <span>at </span>vary from region to region. <span>Occasionally they prefer 3</span>0%<span>, but others find that 0% is fine</span>. </td> <td> <span>+</span> '''<span>[wiki:WikiPedia:</span>Tipping<span>]</span>''' is an important part of ["restaurants" restaurant] etiquette<span>&nbsp;and is certainly a sensiti</span>ve topic. Tipping behavior can be confusing to recent immigrants<span>&nbsp;and can</span> be confusing to students who are just beginning to patronize ["upscale restaurants"] on their own or are going to ["bars"] for the first time. This page presents guidelines you can follow or ignore, but by reading it you will at least get the local business and consumer perspectives<span>. Many students in Davis rely on tips for their livelihood, so you can think of tipping as supporting higher education</span>. Note that this page is about gratuities. You may be looking for ["Cow Tipping"]<span>, as the rates at which</span> bovines get tipped vary from region to region. <span>Unlike humans, bovines prefer to get tipped </span>0%. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 8: </td> <td> Line 8: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> The rule-of-thumb is that one should give a ''minimum'' <span>[wiki:WikiPedia:Tipping tip]</span> of 15%. Others feel it should be less for poor service<span>,</span> and more for excellent service. In some countries, tipping is never done. Many establishments have all the workers pool their tips, and then divy them out again. Some industries have grown to expect tips (restaurants, hotel staff, etc.), yet others rarely get tips. Some think this is unfair.<span>&nbsp;Why give $5 to a person just to deliver carry a plate 15 feet, when the mechanic who struggled (and cursed) for 30 minutes to replace your water pump doesn't get one? (Not to mention the homeless guy standing outside the door who would love to make $5 for carrying your plate 15 feet...) Have you bent over backwards for some customers, but received no tip, because you weren't in a "tipping business"? Better that the business pay the waiter (or whomever) the proper wages, charge the proper prices, and have all tips be entirely voluntary, like the tips jar at the cafe. If people didn't tip, the employers would ''have'' to raise wages due to market forces.</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> The rule-of-thumb is that one should give a ''minimum'' <span>tip</span> of 15%<span>, which is approximately double the tax</span>. Others feel it should be less for poor service and more for excellent service. In some countries, tipping is never done. Many establishments have all the workers pool their tips, and then divy them out again. Some industries have grown to expect tips (restaurants, hotel staff, etc.), yet other<span>&nbsp;industrie</span>s rarely get tips. Some think this is unfair. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 10: </td> <td> Line 10: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> The state of California is generally respectful of employees rights, and provides a number of tipping related [http://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/FAQ_TipsAndGratutities.htm legal guidelines]. Independent of tips, all workers must <span>ser</span>ve<span>rs recei</span>v<span>e minimum wage. Many (especially those who wor</span>k<span>&nbsp;in service industries) li</span>ke <span>this system </span>b<span>ecause some can make a substantial income from tips.</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> The state of California is generally respectful of employees rights, and provides a number of tipping related [http://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/FAQ_TipsAndGratutities.htm legal guidelines]. Independent of tips, all workers must <span>recei</span>ve<span>&nbsp;minimum wage. Many (especially those who work in ser</span>v<span>ice industries) li</span>k<span>e this system because some can ma</span>ke <span>a su</span>b<span>stantial income from tips.</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 12: </td> <td> Line 12: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- ==Commentary==<br> - * This is a complete misunderstanding of the economics involved. Restaurants would not raise their wages. They can't afford it. Compare the number of employees at a nice restaurant to, say, Jack in the Box. You'll have 2 or 3 times as many people (labor costs) serving the same number of customers on average. Average nice restaurant spends 10-15% of its gross on labor costs, so imagine doubling or tripling that to compete with a tipped position. Take away tips and you would lose the good employees that are in demand of a higher paying job and gain the types of folks who work for minimum wage. End tips, end good service. Simple as that. Or the restaurant could just raise their prices and pass the price right back to you.["JeffSpeckles"]<br> - * See Michael Lynn's 2000 paper "Gratitude and Gratuity: a meta-analysis of research on the service-tipping relationship" in ''Journal of Socio-Economics''—the relationship between tipping and quality of service is pretty weak. -["RaghavKrishnapriyan"]<br> - * I don't need to read some PhD's opinion to know that is a load of bull. Service sucks in countries with no tipping. Likewise, go to a fast food restaurant where tipping doesn't exist. Again, service sucks in comparison. Americans are happy being waited on hand and foot, and are happy to pay extra for it too. If they weren't, customary tipping would end tommorrow. Until that changes, 'meta-analyses' mean jack squat. -["JeffSpeckles"]<br> - * Having lived in and gone on extended visits to several countries without tipping (Japan? Singapore?), I can't agree. If you'd read the article, you'd see that he looks at tipping and service charges across countries; they're more correlated with things like unease about inequality than with quality of service. (I'd encourage you not to ignore it just because it disagrees with you, BTW.) As for fast-food restaurants, I don't see how that proves causation at all. In any case, anecdotal evidence tends to be pretty suspect with issues like this. Don't get me wrong: I tip, and I have no problem with the custom. I just don't think it's a very strong determinant of service (see [[http://www.news.cornell.edu/Chronicle/00/8.17.00/Lynn-tipping.html 1]] [[https://registration.ft.com/registration/barrier?referer=http://www.marginalrevolution.com/marginalrevolution/2005/04/what_do_we_know.html&amp;location=http%3A//news.ft.com/cms/s/be390fbe-a893-11d9-87a9-00000e2511c8.html 2]] [[http://www.hotelschool.cornell.edu/chr/research/inbrief/gratuity.html 3]].) -["RaghavKrishnapriyan" RK]<br> - * Thank you for the links. I haven't read them yet, but will. Bottom line is that my initial comment regarding the original post is still valid. Employers can't just raise wages. The money has to come from somewhere. Typical labor costs for a profitable restaurant can be as much as 25% of the gross. Likewise, a good server's tips might be double or triple the employer's wages. To compensate that.....well, do the math. It's impossible without the generosity of tipping. -["JeffSpeckles"]<br> - * After having read the links I fail to see how they are even relevant to what we are discussing. I thought we were discussing tipping vs. not tipping and service. Those links are to an article and an abstract, which describe a study of real customer satisfaction over a range of tip values......but they are all from tipping restaurants. There's no 'non-tipped' control to account for what we're talking about, unless I'm missing it. -["JeffSpeckles"]<br> - <br> - =To tip flat 15% or according to service quality=</span> </td> <td> <span>+ =Flat 15% vs. Service Quality=</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 38: </td> <td> Line 30: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> =Mandatory <span>s</span>ervice <span>c</span>harges <span>f</span>or <span>l</span>arge <span>g</span>roups= </td> <td> <span>+</span> =Mandatory <span>S</span>ervice <span>C</span>harges <span>F</span>or <span>L</span>arge <span>G</span>roups= </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 52: </td> <td> Line 44: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> =Tipping <span>f</span>or Drinks= </td> <td> <span>+</span> =Tipping <span>F</span>or Drinks=<span><br> + </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 65: </td> <td> Line 58: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> =Tipping <span>o</span>n <span>d</span>iscounted <span>i</span>tems= </td> <td> <span>+</span> =Tipping <span>O</span>n <span>D</span>iscounted <span>I</span>tems=<span><br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-03-09 09:42:45CraigBrozinskyslight reorganization b/c i don't want to edit this anymore <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 7: </td> <td> Line 7: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> <span>=</span>=General principles=<span>=</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> =General principles= </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 10: </td> <td> Line 10: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> *This is a complete misunderstanding of the economics involved. Restaurants would not raise their wages. They can't afford it. Compare the number of employees at a nice restaurant to, say, Jack in the Box. You'll have 2 or 3 times as many people (labor costs) serving the same number of customers on average. Average nice restaurant spends 10-15% of its gross on labor costs, so imagine doubling or tripling that to compete with a tipped position. Take away tips and you would lose the good employees that are in demand of a higher paying job and gain the types of folks who work for minimum wage. End tips, end good service. Simple as that. Or the restaurant could just raise their prices and pass the price right back to you.["JeffSpeckles"] </td> <td> <span>+ The state of California is generally respectful of employees rights, and provides a number of tipping related [http://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/FAQ_TipsAndGratutities.htm legal guidelines]. Independent of tips, all workers must servers receive minimum wage. Many (especially those who work in service industries) like this system because some can make a substantial income from tips.<br> + <br> + ==Commentary==<br> +</span> *<span>&nbsp;</span>This is a complete misunderstanding of the economics involved. Restaurants would not raise their wages. They can't afford it. Compare the number of employees at a nice restaurant to, say, Jack in the Box. You'll have 2 or 3 times as many people (labor costs) serving the same number of customers on average. Average nice restaurant spends 10-15% of its gross on labor costs, so imagine doubling or tripling that to compete with a tipped position. Take away tips and you would lose the good employees that are in demand of a higher paying job and gain the types of folks who work for minimum wage. End tips, end good service. Simple as that. Or the restaurant could just raise their prices and pass the price right back to you.["JeffSpeckles"] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 15: </td> <td> Line 18: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * After having read the links I fail to see how they are even relevant to what we are discussing. I thought we were discussing tipping vs. not tipping and service. Those links are to an article and an abstract, which describe a study of real customer satisfaction over a range of tip values......but they are all from tipping restaurants. There's no 'non-tipped' control to account for what we're talking about, unless I'm missing it. -["JeffSpeckles"]</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 16: </td> <td> Line 20: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- * After having read the links I fail to see how they are even relevant to what we are discussing. I thought we were discussing tipping vs. not tipping and service. Those links are to an article and an abstract, which describe a study of real customer satisfaction over a range of tip values......but they are all from tipping restaurants. There's no 'non-tipped' control to account for what we're talking about, unless I'm missing it. -["JeffSpeckles"]<br> - <br> - The state of California is generally respectful of employees rights, and provides a number of tipping related [http://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/FAQ_TipsAndGratutities.htm legal guidelines]. Independent of tips, all workers must servers receive minimum wage. Many (especially those who work in service industries) like this system because some can make a substantial income from tips.<br> - <br> - ''If there is a delivery charge already included, do you still tip?'' -- ["JoAnnaRich" JR]<br> - * That's a really good question, and is one of the reasons I don't like getting things delivered. My guess is that the delivery fee goes to the owners, not to the delivery person. If that's true, you should tip. ["CraigBrozinsky"]<br> - <br> - <br> - == Mandatory service charges for large groups ==<br> - <br> - I think this is a reasonable policy. First, 15% gratuity is the rockbottom minimum tip you should give provided the waitstaff doesn't majorly screw up. Second, most waitstaff get paid peanuts by the restaurant, and make their money primarily from tips. The 15% surcharge guarantees that the waitstaff get just compensation for a particularly heavy workload. If you disagree with these policies, you have these options (1) eat at McDonalds, (2) go to a foreign country where the waitstaff get decent salaries and never recieve tips, (3) complain to restaurant owners and tell them to raise the salaries of the waitstaff-- by simply holding back a tip, you're focussing your annoyance at the wrong people. That is, you exploit workers who are already exploited by their management. As for the 15% gratuity charge, if you feel that your party of 8 or more has not received adequate service, you're well within your right to complain to the management. Any restaurant in their right mind will waive the charge. Remember, you're the consumer and a restaurant would rather calm an upset customer than have their reputation smeared. ["CraigBrozinsky"]<br> - <br> - Yay! Well said. ["JeffSpeckles"]<br> - ------<br> - If such policies were not in place the server would make less money than if the party weren't there. A big top takes more time to manage as a server, and the other tables in his/her section can suffer because of it, probably costing the server additional tips. Large groups are usually not paid for by a single individual, so in many groups there will usually be the one person in the group who will contribute less than their fair share. As a result a server would get a smaller tip because of the cheapskate in the group. A server is very likely to get more money off of 2 four tops than a single eight top. --["RogerClark"]<br> - ------<br> - OK, my observation is on the poor comparison. A mechanic is paid for the parts AND the labor as 2 separate charges. At a restaurant food and service are combined into a single charge and are not as easy to separate. The other issue is that mechanics charge around $70-75/hr for labor. While that labor rate covers overhead as well as wages, I am sure a mechanic doesn't work for minimum wage. - ["RogerClark"]<br> - ------<br> - Fixed gratuities for parties of 8 or more are used because quite often a waiter will be servicing only one table if it is 8 or more. no tip or a small tip could mean thats all they get for the night. tips are often taken into account when calculating how much a waiter makes in salary. to the comment that they are allready making a wad of money for having you eat there, the gratuity never goes to the restraunt but actually goes to the waiter. this practice usually is only reserved for upscale places. usually i tip well and if there is desent service 15% is less than what i give. my revenge is that if they put the charge i dont ad the extra 3% i would normally give. -["MattHh"]<br> - <br> - [http://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/FAQ_TipsAndGratutities.htm Note (6)] that these are considered the employer's property and not the employee's property. The employer may give the workers 10%, 5%, or nothing at all if they choose.<br> - <br> - == To tip flat 15% or according to service quality ==</span> </td> <td> <span>+ =To tip flat 15% or according to service quality=</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 56: </td> <td> Line 38: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- == Tipping for Drinks ==</span> </td> <td> <span>+ =Mandatory service charges for large groups=<br> + <br> + I think this is a reasonable policy. First, 15% gratuity is the rockbottom minimum tip you should give provided the waitstaff doesn't majorly screw up. Second, most waitstaff get paid peanuts by the restaurant, and make their money primarily from tips. The 15% surcharge guarantees that the waitstaff get just compensation for a particularly heavy workload. If you disagree with these policies, you have these options (1) eat at McDonalds, (2) go to a foreign country where the waitstaff get decent salaries and never recieve tips, (3) complain to restaurant owners and tell them to raise the salaries of the waitstaff-- by simply holding back a tip, you're focussing your annoyance at the wrong people. That is, you exploit workers who are already exploited by their management. As for the 15% gratuity charge, if you feel that your party of 8 or more has not received adequate service, you're well within your right to complain to the management. Any restaurant in their right mind will waive the charge. Remember, you're the consumer and a restaurant would rather calm an upset customer than have their reputation smeared. ["CraigBrozinsky"]<br> + <br> + Yay! Well said. ["JeffSpeckles"]<br> + ------<br> + If such policies were not in place the server would make less money than if the party weren't there. A big top takes more time to manage as a server, and the other tables in his/her section can suffer because of it, probably costing the server additional tips. Large groups are usually not paid for by a single individual, so in many groups there will usually be the one person in the group who will contribute less than their fair share. As a result a server would get a smaller tip because of the cheapskate in the group. A server is very likely to get more money off of 2 four tops than a single eight top. --["RogerClark"]<br> + ------<br> + OK, my observation is on the poor comparison. A mechanic is paid for the parts AND the labor as 2 separate charges. At a restaurant food and service are combined into a single charge and are not as easy to separate. The other issue is that mechanics charge around $70-75/hr for labor. While that labor rate covers overhead as well as wages, I am sure a mechanic doesn't work for minimum wage. - ["RogerClark"]<br> + ------<br> + Fixed gratuities for parties of 8 or more are used because quite often a waiter will be servicing only one table if it is 8 or more. no tip or a small tip could mean thats all they get for the night. tips are often taken into account when calculating how much a waiter makes in salary. to the comment that they are allready making a wad of money for having you eat there, the gratuity never goes to the restraunt but actually goes to the waiter. this practice usually is only reserved for upscale places. usually i tip well and if there is desent service 15% is less than what i give. my revenge is that if they put the charge i dont ad the extra 3% i would normally give. -["MattHh"]<br> + <br> + [http://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/FAQ_TipsAndGratutities.htm Note (6)] that these are considered the employer's property and not the employee's property. The employer may give the workers 10%, 5%, or nothing at all if they choose.<br> + <br> + =Tipping for Drinks=</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 69: </td> <td> Line 65: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> =<span>= </span>Tipping on discounted items<span>&nbsp;</span>=<span>=</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> =Tipping on discounted items= </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 73: </td> <td> Line 69: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> =<span>= </span>Tipping for Delivered Food<span>&nbsp;</span>=<span>=</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> =Tipping for Delivered Food= </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 75: </td> <td> Line 71: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- You order food for delivery and you're told that you'll be charged $1 or $2 for delivery. When the food guy/girl shows up, do you still tip them? By how much do you tip in this situation? How much do you tip when your not charged for delivery?</span> </td> <td> <span>+ * ''If there is a delivery charge already included, do you still tip?'' -- ["JoAnnaRich" JR]<br> + * That's a really good question, and is one of the reasons I don't like getting things delivered. My guess is that the delivery fee goes to the owners, not to the delivery person. If that's true, you should tip. ["CraigBrozinsky"]</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 77: </td> <td> Line 74: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Back when I worked at a pizza place, the buck they charged for delivery was to pay for the driver's gas expenses. So I guess it technically went to the driver, but only to offset the huge cost of driving around town in his own car. The expected tip in that situation was your standard 15%. Off of most pizza orders, that's only gonna be two to four bucks. It may be a bummer to shell out the extra cash, but at least you don't have to leave the house.<br> <span>- <br> - ----<br> - <br> -</span> What if the person serving you IS the owner? For example, the ["University Haircutters" barber in the basement], John Salido -- he's a very nice man and an excellent barber, but I feel weird tipping him because he's the owner and thus all the money goes to him anyway.. and I probably need the money more than him. -["KrisFricke"]<br> <span>- <br> -</span> *It's a bad assumption to say that because someone owns a business, they are well off. Also, most of the companies fixed costs (ie. rent, utilities, equipment, supplies) are still present despite lack of employees. So to say that "all of the money goes to him anyway" is far from the truth. I think if you're pleased with your service from a business owner, that's all the more reason to tip, because they are solely responsible for your good experience, and they work hard to give it. -Peter<span>&nbsp;</span>Anselmo<span><br> - </span> </td> <td> <span>+ *</span> Back when I worked at a pizza place, the buck they charged for delivery was to pay for the driver's gas expenses. So I guess it technically went to the driver, but only to offset the huge cost of driving around town in his own car. The expected tip in that situation was your standard 15%. Off of most pizza orders, that's only gonna be two to four bucks. It may be a bummer to shell out the extra cash, but at least you don't have to leave the house.<br> <span>+ *</span> What if the person serving you IS the owner? For example, the ["University Haircutters" barber in the basement], John Salido -- he's a very nice man and an excellent barber, but I feel weird tipping him because he's the owner and thus all the money goes to him anyway.. and I probably need the money more than him. -["KrisFricke"]<br> <span>+</span> *It's a bad assumption to say that because someone owns a business, they are well off. Also, most of the companies fixed costs (ie. rent, utilities, equipment, supplies) are still present despite lack of employees. So to say that "all of the money goes to him anyway" is far from the truth. I think if you're pleased with your service from a business owner, that's all the more reason to tip, because they are solely responsible for your good experience, and they work hard to give it. -<span>- ["</span>PeterAnselmo<span>"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-03-09 08:28:07JabberWokky <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- </span>Tipping is an important part of ["restaurants" restaurant] etiquette, and certainly a controversial topic. Tipping behavior can be confusing to recent immigrants, and can also be confusing to students who are just beginning to patronize ["upscale restaurants"] on their own or are going to ["bars"] for the first time. This page presents guidelines you can follow or ignore, but by reading it you will at least get the local business and consumer perspectives. Note that this page is about gratuities. You may be looking for ["Cow Tipping"] as the rates bovines get tipped at vary from region to region. Occasionally they prefer 30%, but others find that 0% is fine. </td> <td> <span>+ '''</span>Tipping<span>'''</span> is an important part of ["restaurants" restaurant] etiquette, and certainly a controversial topic. Tipping behavior can be confusing to recent immigrants, and can also be confusing to students who are just beginning to patronize ["upscale restaurants"] on their own or are going to ["bars"] for the first time. This page presents guidelines you can follow or ignore, but by reading it you will at least get the local business and consumer perspectives. Note that this page is about gratuities. You may be looking for ["Cow Tipping"] as the rates bovines get tipped at vary from region to region. Occasionally they prefer 30%, but others find that 0% is fine. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-03-08 22:27:23CraigBrozinskytoc <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 5: </td> <td> Line 5: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ [[TableofContents]]<br> + <br> + ==General principles==</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-03-08 18:42:00JarrettNobleAnswered Craig <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 64: </td> <td> Line 64: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- </span> </td> <td> <span>+ * I worked for a few places in Napa a while back and usually most wait staff or bartenders expected the addition of wine to be incorporated into the total bill before gratuity percentage is calculated. I can understand how this can become very expensive and honestly its not a very hard task. From your example I would maybe tip 8-10% on the cost of the wine and probably end up leaving $30 total. But its not uncommon for people to leave a 5% tip on the alcohol. If you drank that much in cocktail's I would tip more because more work is involved. One thing to consider is when a server closes out at the end of a shift, total sales reflect alcohol as well. In some restaurants the servers tip out the hostess, busser, expo, bartender, and kitchen a percentage from sales as opposed to a percentage of total tips earned. Although we are able to split food and alcohol totals at Sophia's, some places don't do that. Therefore, the server could sometimes be tipping out more because their sales have been inflated by the alcohol cost. From a bartending perspective if I was tipped $10 on opening two bottles of wine I would be very happy. Its really up to you and how satisfied you are from spending $200 (hopefully you are for that much.) Some people tip the total bill, some people don't. I can understand both sides, but personally lean towards tipping more, but I am biased. ["jarrettnoble"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-03-08 18:10:25EdwinSaada- my comment <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 31: </td> <td> Line 31: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- ''2005-09-15 15:07:33'' I think 15% for 8 or more is fair, but I disagree that the 12-15% range is usually considered the "right" amount to tip all waiters. I hate crappy waiters who don't deserve it. They don't get paid peanuts here in Davis. Yeah, it is legal to pay waiters less then minimum wage (as long as the amount of tips brings them to minimum wage), but no place in Davis does that. (It is notlegal to do that anywhere in the state of CA. --JS) They all get at least minimum, most of them more. Tough job, this that, perhaps. But that doesn't warrant an automatic 15% just for doing their job. Somewhere in the last year or two I've become bitter towards undeserving waitstaff. It's not exploitation. Just as I can go to McDonalds or a foreign country, I could argue they could get a different job. (For the record, I do tip. Usually double the tax and then make it an even number. But still.) /rant --["EdwinSaada"]<br> - "Crappy waiters who don't deserve it" is kind of a loaded term. Service can be bad for one of two reasons. One, the server is incompetent, slow, or just neglects you. These folks should be given a low tip. There are also servers that bust their and are required to wait about two times as many tables as they should. If you give this latter group a crappy tip, the server is getting shat on by both the management and the customer. For situations where things are beyond the control of the server, I think it important to complain to the management, ask for some discount on your food, and give the server a reasonable tip. I did this the other night at ["Bistro 33"]. --["CraigBrozinsky"]<br> - ------</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 51: </td> <td> Line 48: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- <br> - * This city doesn't have places that offer less then minimum wage to servers, like some parts of the country do. That being the case, I don't care about their living costs. Give me a break. I tip for service given, and I hate how so many people dislike the service but still give 15%. I've travelled, and have been to places where you do not tip servers, and the service is different indeed. But to constantly give a fixed amount as a rule-of-thumb is a bad idea in my opinion. It becomes something they routinely expect regardless of what's going on, and is no longer the incentive that I feel tipping was meant to be. It demeans the whole concept and becomes an additional service fee. I'm nearly in line with Mr. Pink nowadays. - -["EdwinSaada" Ed]<br> - </span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-03-08 17:17:51GregWebbComment added. <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 105: </td> <td> Line 105: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ------<br> + ''2007-03-08 16:17:51'' [[nbsp]] I tip the standard but I tip cows much more. --["GregWebb"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-03-08 17:08:08ElleWeberfixed link <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Tipping is an important part of ["restaurant" restaurant] etiquette, and certainly a controversial topic. Tipping behavior can be confusing to recent immigrants, and can also be confusing to students who are just beginning to patronize ["upscale restaurants"] on their own or are going to ["bars"] for the first time. This page presents guidelines you can follow or ignore, but by reading it you will at least get the local business and consumer perspectives. Note that this page is about gratuities. You may be looking for ["Cow Tipping"] as the rates bovines get tipped at vary from region to region. Occasionally they prefer 30%, but others find that 0% is fine. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Tipping is an important part of ["restaurant<span>s</span>" restaurant] etiquette, and certainly a controversial topic. Tipping behavior can be confusing to recent immigrants, and can also be confusing to students who are just beginning to patronize ["upscale restaurants"] on their own or are going to ["bars"] for the first time. This page presents guidelines you can follow or ignore, but by reading it you will at least get the local business and consumer perspectives. Note that this page is about gratuities. You may be looking for ["Cow Tipping"] as the rates bovines get tipped at vary from region to region. Occasionally they prefer 30%, but others find that 0% is fine. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-03-08 16:07:49CraigBrozinskya few things <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- This page does have relevance to the community. Many davis residents work in service industry jobs where tipping is involved. Furthermore, I would venture a guess that about 99% of the davis community are involved in interactions where tipping would be appropiate. Relevance measures a document's applicability to a given subject or query.<br> - - If relevance is defined in this way, then<br> - - Any community members inquiry on tipping in relation to other objects within the community creates applicablity<br> - - which therefore creates relevance.<br> - The wikizens are merely trying to create a forum for the enternal question on when a tip (if any) is appropiate and at what percentage that tip should be. As long as people tip in davis and there are people to recieve these tips there will be relevance to tipping in the community. ["jarrettnoble"]<br> - <br> - This page is about gratuities. You may be looking for ["Cow Tipping"] as the rates bovines get tipped at vary from region to region. Occasionally they prefer 30%, but others find that 0% is fine.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ Tipping is an important part of ["restaurant" restaurant] etiquette, and certainly a controversial topic. Tipping behavior can be confusing to recent immigrants, and can also be confusing to students who are just beginning to patronize ["upscale restaurants"] on their own or are going to ["bars"] for the first time. This page presents guidelines you can follow or ignore, but by reading it you will at least get the local business and consumer perspectives. Note that this page is about gratuities. You may be looking for ["Cow Tipping"] as the rates bovines get tipped at vary from region to region. Occasionally they prefer 30%, but others find that 0% is fine.</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 73: </td> <td> Line 67: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * in general, it sounds like you always give more than 20% per drink. how do your tips work if a cocktail <span>waitress</span> takes your order, and does tipping the waitress mean the bartender doesn't get the tip, or is that usually split? ["CraigBrozinsky"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> * in general, it sounds like you always give more than 20% per drink. how do your tips work if a cocktail <span>server</span> takes your order, and does tipping the waitress mean the bartender doesn't get the tip, or is that usually split? ["CraigBrozinsky"] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 75: </td> <td> Line 69: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * Thanks! Also, how much should you tip a server at a restaurant if you bought an expensive wine? For example, if you like to tip 20% for food, get $100 worth of food and two $50 bottles of wine ($200 bill). --["CraigBrozinsky"]<br> + </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 93: </td> <td> Line 89: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- ----<br> - <br> - The last word on tipping, from [http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0105236/quotes ''Reservoir Dogs'']:<br> - <br> - {{{Nice Guy Eddie: C'mon, throw in a buck!<br> - Mr. Pink: Uh-uh, I don't tip.<br> - Nice Guy Eddie: You don't tip?<br> - Mr. Pink: Nah, I don't believe in it.<br> - Nice Guy Eddie: You don't believe in tipping?<br> - Mr. Blue: You know what these chicks make? They make shit.<br> - Mr. Pink: Don't give me that. She don't make enough money that she can quit.<br> - Nice Guy Eddie: I don't even know a fucking Jew who'd have the balls to say that. Let me get this straight: you don't ever tip?<br> - Mr. Pink: I don't tip because society says I have to. All right, if someone deserves a tip, if they really put forth an effort, I'll give them something a little something extra. But this tipping automatically, it's for the birds. As far as I'm concerned, they're just doing their job.<br> - Mr. Blue: Hey, our girl was nice.<br> - Mr. Pink: She was okay. She wasn't anything special.<br> - Mr. Blue: What's special? Take you in the back and suck your dick?<br> - Nice Guy Eddie: I'd go over twelve percent for that.<br> - Mr. Pink: Look, I ordered coffee. Now we've been here a long fucking time and she's only filled my cup three times. When I order coffee, I want it filled *six* times.<br> - Mr. Blonde: Six times. Well, what if she's too fucking busy?<br> - Mr. Pink: The words "too fucking busy" shouldn't be in a waitress's vocabulary.<br> - Nice Guy Eddie: Excuse me, Mr. Pink, but I think the last fucking thing you need is another cup of coffee.<br> - MR. PINK: Jesus Christ - I mean these ladies aren't starving to death. They make minimum wage. You know, I used to work minimum wage. And when I did, I wasn't lucky enough to have a job society deemed tip-worthy.<br> - MR. BLUE: You don't care they're counting on your tips to live?<br> - (Mr. Pink rubs two of his fingers together.)<br> - MR. PINK: You know what this is? It's the world's smallest violin playing just for the waitresses.<br> - MR. WHITE: You don't have any idea what you're talking about. These people bust their ass. This is a hard job.<br> - MR. PINK: So's working at McDonald's, but you don't feel the need to tip them, do you? Why not? They're servin ya food. But no, society says don't tip these guys over here, but tip these guys over here. That's bullshit.<br> - MR. WHITE: Waitressing is the number one occupation for female noncollege graduates in this country. It's the one job basically any woman can get and make a living on. The reason is because of their tips.<br> - MR. PINK: (pauses) Fuck all that.<br> - (They all laugh.)<br> - MR. BROWN: Jesus Christ!<br> - MR. PINK: Hey, I'm very sorry that the government taxes their tips. That's fucked up. That ain't my fault. It would appear that waitresses are just one of the many groups the government fucks in the ass on a regular basis. You show me a paper says the government shouldn't do that, I'll sign it. Put it to a vote, I'll vote for it. But what I won't do is play ball. And this non-college bullshit you're giving me, I got two words for that: "Learn to fuckin type." Cause if you're expecting me to help out with the rent, you're in for a big fuckin' surprise.<br> - MR. ORANGE: Hey - he's convinced me. Give me my dollar back.<br> - EDDIE: Hey! Leave the dollars there.}}}<br> - <br> - </span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 139: </td> <td> Line 99: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ------<br> + This page does have relevance to the community. Many davis residents work in service industry jobs where tipping is involved. Furthermore, I would venture a guess that about 99% of the davis community are involved in interactions where tipping would be appropiate. Relevance measures a document's applicability to a given subject or query.<br> + - If relevance is defined in this way, then<br> + - Any community members inquiry on tipping in relation to other objects within the community creates applicablity<br> + - which therefore creates relevance.<br> + The wikizens are merely trying to create a forum for the enternal question on when a tip (if any) is appropiate and at what percentage that tip should be. As long as people tip in davis and there are people to recieve these tips there will be relevance to tipping in the community. ["jarrettnoble"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-03-08 15:38:39JarrettNoble <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 138: </td> <td> Line 138: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- ------</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-03-08 15:37:51JarrettNobleComment added. <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 138: </td> <td> Line 138: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ------<br> + ''2007-03-08 14:37:51'' [[nbsp]] Half of this entry does cover that subject, it just occurs about midway through the page. I'd be happy to reorganize it and restructure some of the sentences. As amusing as it is the movie dialogue should go. --["JarrettNoble"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-03-08 15:31:13JarrettNoble <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 138: </td> <td> Line 138: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- ''2007-03-08 14:28:03'' [[nbsp]] Steven dop some research before tipping in a non-tipping country in some places and in some respects tipping in a country where it is not the norm can be percieved as an insult. It makes little sense to me but its true --["JarrettNoble"]</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-03-08 15:29:30JarrettNoble <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 7: </td> <td> Line 7: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> The wikizens are merely trying to create a forum for the enternal question on when a tip (if any) is appropiate and at what percentage that tip should be. As long as people tip in davis and there are people to recieve these tips there will be relevance to tipping in the community. </td> <td> <span>+</span> The wikizens are merely trying to create a forum for the enternal question on when a tip (if any) is appropiate and at what percentage that tip should be. As long as people tip in davis and there are people to recieve these tips there will be relevance to tipping in the community.<span>&nbsp;["jarrettnoble"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-03-08 15:28:51JarrettNoble <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 2: </td> <td> Line 2: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + This page does have relevance to the community. Many davis residents work in service industry jobs where tipping is involved. Furthermore, I would venture a guess that about 99% of the davis community are involved in interactions where tipping would be appropiate. Relevance measures a document's applicability to a given subject or query.<br> + - If relevance is defined in this way, then<br> + - Any community members inquiry on tipping in relation to other objects within the community creates applicablity<br> + - which therefore creates relevance.<br> + The wikizens are merely trying to create a forum for the enternal question on when a tip (if any) is appropiate and at what percentage that tip should be. As long as people tip in davis and there are people to recieve these tips there will be relevance to tipping in the community.<br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-03-08 15:28:03JarrettNobleComment added. <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 130: </td> <td> Line 130: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ------<br> + ''2007-03-08 14:28:03'' [[nbsp]] Steven dop some research before tipping in a non-tipping country in some places and in some respects tipping in a country where it is not the norm can be percieved as an insult. It makes little sense to me but its true --["JarrettNoble"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-03-08 15:03:49DavidPoole <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 2: </td> <td> Line 2: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- </span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 130: </td> <td> Line 129: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * Perhaps this entry can be davisified by noting usual tipping habits around town, where are there tip jars, and about college students tipping habits? I mean, this is a pretty viable topic, it just shouldn't be a discussion about tipping in general, anyone want to rewrite? ~["DavePoole"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-03-08 14:57:28JarrettNobleComment added. <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 128: </td> <td> Line 128: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ------<br> + ''2007-03-08 13:57:28'' [[nbsp]] Steven dop some research before tipping in a non-tipping country in some places and in some respects tipping in a country where it is not the norm can be percieved as an insult. It makes little sense to me but its true --["JarrettNoble"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-03-08 14:24:42JarrettNobleComment added. <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 126: </td> <td> Line 126: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ------<br> + ''2007-03-08 13:24:42'' [[nbsp]] Steven dop some research before tipping in a non-tipping country in some places and in some respects tipping in a country where it is not the norm can be percieved as an insult. It makes little sense to me but its true --["JarrettNoble"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-03-08 11:31:25KaiTingRelevance: there aren't special rules for tipping in Davis ... <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ [[include(Relevance)]]<br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-03-08 11:15:19JeffSpeckles <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 66: </td> <td> Line 66: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ --Craig, cocktail servers (not always female) usually "tip out" the bartenders at the end of their shift. The exact amount varies, of course, but it is typically 10-15% of their tips. I usually sit at the bar proper to drink, or order myself, but if I were to have cocktail service I'd upgrade the tip accordingly. --["JeffSpeckles"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-03-08 03:34:37CraigBrozinskybar question <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 65: </td> <td> Line 65: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- <br> - <br> - </span> </td> <td> <span>+ * in general, it sounds like you always give more than 20% per drink. how do your tips work if a cocktail waitress takes your order, and does tipping the waitress mean the bartender doesn't get the tip, or is that usually split? ["CraigBrozinsky"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-03-08 02:04:38JarrettNoble <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 62: </td> <td> Line 62: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ I've been working in ["bars"] for a long time and I would say in general ["bartenders"] are happy with a dollar a drink. For beer, wine, and your typical vodka/tonic style drinks this seems to be the norm. Those drinks are simple and quick to prepare. If the bill is $9 and you pay with a $10 bill leaving the buck as change is pretty typical. On drinks that require more time (blended drinks, mojitos, flavored martinis) tipping more is a good idea and always appreciated. I think it also kind of depends on the situation. If your sitting at the bar and getting served promptly, hanging out, eating, and/or having fun you should tip accordingly. If your at a bar later at night, its usually busier and your just coming up, ordering drinks and then moving on. Tips are going to be less in this situation. There are a lot of variances to consider, how quick the service is, how good the drink is, how many different types of drinks were ordered, and how often you frequent the establishment.<br> + <br> + I understand that tipping is completely optional. I get the whole "we should be happy about getting any tip in the first place," logic. There are always going to be people that don't tip, its part of the industry. My suggestions above should generally get you standard service in most places. I always tip more than that,(usually a couple bucks a beer, and $3-$5 on the more intricate stuff) but I'm biased so I won't attempt to argue that this should be the standard. Although I, of course, think it should be. Whats unique about bars as opposed to other service industry occupations is that the tip doesn't usually end the experience. Most times you will be coming back up to bar for additional beverages. Consequently, your tipping is noticed whether it be bad or good. If good, the service gets quicker, the drinks get stronger, and sometimes free drinks "appear." If bad or nonexistent, it starts to take longer each time and you get looked over. As a matter of pride I never short-pour a drink (less booze) because of tipping, but it does happen. If you leave a waiter a bad tip, chances are you won't see them again for a while, but when you leave a bartender a bad one they see you again much sooner. You would be suprised how much quicker your getting served when your leaving 2 or more dollars a drink. My point is that tipping in a bar can be very beneficial to the customer. If your not a good tipper or don't believe in it thats fine, just don't be suprised about the level of service you recieve. A convincing argument could be made that service should be standard whether you tip or not. But that will never be the case, its too uneconomical. Serve more people that tip, make more money. I'm not saying that the its justifiable for the level of service to drop drastically (it does happen) but there will always be a decline in service at a bar if your a bad tipper. Personal feelings on your rights to tip or not tip don't matter, your current economical situation doesn't matter, if you tip its rewarded if you don't things can take a turn for the worse. ["jarrettnoble"]<br> + <br> + <br> + <br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-01-28 19:15:10StevenDaubertMade the last word, the last word, well at least before comments <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 72: </td> <td> Line 72: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ----<br> + <br> + What if the person serving you IS the owner? For example, the ["University Haircutters" barber in the basement], John Salido -- he's a very nice man and an excellent barber, but I feel weird tipping him because he's the owner and thus all the money goes to him anyway.. and I probably need the money more than him. -["KrisFricke"]<br> + <br> + *It's a bad assumption to say that because someone owns a business, they are well off. Also, most of the companies fixed costs (ie. rent, utilities, equipment, supplies) are still present despite lack of employees. So to say that "all of the money goes to him anyway" is far from the truth. I think if you're pleased with your service from a business owner, that's all the more reason to tip, because they are solely responsible for your good experience, and they work hard to give it. -Peter Anselmo<br> + <br> + <br> + ----<br> + </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 105: </td> <td> Line 114: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- ---<br> - <br> - What if the person serving you IS the owner? For example, the ["University Haircutters" barber in the basement], John Salido -- he's a very nice man and an excellent barber, but I feel weird tipping him because he's the owner and thus all the money goes to him anyway.. and I probably need the money more than him. -["KrisFricke"]<br> - <br> - *It's a bad assumption to say that because someone owns a business, they are well off. Also, most of the companies fixed costs (ie. rent, utilities, equipment, supplies) are still present despite lack of employees. So to say that "all of the money goes to him anyway" is far from the truth. I think if you're pleased with your service from a business owner, that's all the more reason to tip, because they are solely responsible for your good experience, and they work hard to give it. -Peter Anselmo</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-01-28 19:12:21StevenDaubertComment added. <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 112: </td> <td> Line 112: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ------<br> + ''2007-01-28 18:12:21'' [[nbsp]] I tip based on quality of service. I judge the quality to my personal standards and leave what I think is an accurate. Hell I tip on Shirly Temples, which is a soda with grenadine, it still comes from a bartender so I tip. I can't wait to go to a non tipping country and tip. --["StevenDaubert"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-01-28 19:04:26CraigBrozinskyemphasizing minimum <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> -<span>&nbsp;The rule</span>-<span>of-</span>thumb is that one should give a <span>minimum</span> [wiki:WikiPedia:Tipping tip] of 15%. Others feel it should be less for poor service, and more for excellent service. In some countries, tipping is never done. Many establishments have all the workers pool their tips, and then divy them out again. Some industries have grown to expect tips (restaurants, hotel staff, etc.), yet others rarely get tips. Some think this is unfair. Why give $5 to a person just to deliver carry a plate 15 feet, when the mechanic who struggled (and cursed) for 30 minutes to replace your water pump doesn't get one? (Not to mention the homeless guy standing outside the door who would love to make $5 for carrying your plate 15 feet...) Have you bent over backwards for some customers, but received no tip, because you weren't in a "tipping business"? Better that the business pay the waiter (or whomever) the proper wages, charge the proper prices, and have all tips be entirely voluntary, like the tips jar at the cafe. If people didn't tip, the employers would ''have'' to raise wages due to market forces. </td> <td> <span>+ The rule</span>-<span>of</span>-thumb is that one should give a <span>''minimum''</span> [wiki:WikiPedia:Tipping tip] of 15%. Others feel it should be less for poor service, and more for excellent service. In some countries, tipping is never done. Many establishments have all the workers pool their tips, and then divy them out again. Some industries have grown to expect tips (restaurants, hotel staff, etc.), yet others rarely get tips. Some think this is unfair. Why give $5 to a person just to deliver carry a plate 15 feet, when the mechanic who struggled (and cursed) for 30 minutes to replace your water pump doesn't get one? (Not to mention the homeless guy standing outside the door who would love to make $5 for carrying your plate 15 feet...) Have you bent over backwards for some customers, but received no tip, because you weren't in a "tipping business"? Better that the business pay the waiter (or whomever) the proper wages, charge the proper prices, and have all tips be entirely voluntary, like the tips jar at the cafe. If people didn't tip, the employers would ''have'' to raise wages due to market forces. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-01-08 21:55:18PeterAnselmoadded comment <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 109: </td> <td> Line 109: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ *It's a bad assumption to say that because someone owns a business, they are well off. Also, most of the companies fixed costs (ie. rent, utilities, equipment, supplies) are still present despite lack of employees. So to say that "all of the money goes to him anyway" is far from the truth. I think if you're pleased with your service from a business owner, that's all the more reason to tip, because they are solely responsible for your good experience, and they work hard to give it. -Peter Anselmo</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2007-01-08 20:08:17CraigBrozinskyminimum clarification and section about happy hour <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> -<span>&nbsp;The rule</span>-<span>of-</span>thumb is that one should [wiki:WikiPedia:Tipping tip] 15%. Others feel it should be less for poor service, and more for excellent service. In some countries, tipping is never done. Many establishments have all the workers pool their tips, and then divy them out again. Some industries have grown to expect tips (restaurants, hotel staff, etc.), yet others rarely get tips. Some think this is unfair. Why give $5 to a person just to deliver carry a plate 15 feet, when the mechanic who struggled (and cursed) for 30 minutes to replace your water pump doesn't get one? (Not to mention the homeless guy standing outside the door who would love to make $5 for carrying your plate 15 feet...) Have you bent over backwards for some customers, but received no tip, because you weren't in a "tipping business"? Better that the business pay the waiter (or whomever) the proper wages, charge the proper prices, and have all tips be entirely voluntary, like the tips jar at the cafe. If people didn't tip, the employers would ''have'' to raise wages due to market forces. </td> <td> <span>+ The rule</span>-<span>of</span>-thumb is that one should<span>&nbsp;give a minimum</span> [wiki:WikiPedia:Tipping tip]<span>&nbsp;of</span> 15%. Others feel it should be less for poor service, and more for excellent service. In some countries, tipping is never done. Many establishments have all the workers pool their tips, and then divy them out again. Some industries have grown to expect tips (restaurants, hotel staff, etc.), yet others rarely get tips. Some think this is unfair. Why give $5 to a person just to deliver carry a plate 15 feet, when the mechanic who struggled (and cursed) for 30 minutes to replace your water pump doesn't get one? (Not to mention the homeless guy standing outside the door who would love to make $5 for carrying your plate 15 feet...) Have you bent over backwards for some customers, but received no tip, because you weren't in a "tipping business"? Better that the business pay the waiter (or whomever) the proper wages, charge the proper prices, and have all tips be entirely voluntary, like the tips jar at the cafe. If people didn't tip, the employers would ''have'' to raise wages due to market forces. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 21: </td> <td> Line 21: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> I think this is a reasonable policy. First, 15% gratuity is the minimum tip you should give provided the waitstaff doesn't majorly screw up. Second, most waitstaff get paid peanuts by the restaurant, and make their money primarily from tips. The 15% surcharge guarantees that the waitstaff get just compensation for a particularly heavy workload. If you disagree with these policies, you have these options (1) eat at McDonalds, (2) go to a foreign country where the waitstaff get decent salaries and never recieve tips, (3) complain to restaurant owners and tell them to raise the salaries of the waitstaff-- by simply holding back a tip, you're focussing your annoyance at the wrong people. That is, you exploit workers who are already exploited by their management. As for the 15% gratuity charge, if you feel that your party of 8 or more has not received adequate service, you're well within your right to complain to the management. Any restaurant in their right mind will waive the charge. Remember, you're the consumer and a restaurant would rather calm an upset customer than have their reputation smeared. ["CraigBrozinsky"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> I think this is a reasonable policy. First, 15% gratuity is the <span>rockbottom </span>minimum tip you should give provided the waitstaff doesn't majorly screw up. Second, most waitstaff get paid peanuts by the restaurant, and make their money primarily from tips. The 15% surcharge guarantees that the waitstaff get just compensation for a particularly heavy workload. If you disagree with these policies, you have these options (1) eat at McDonalds, (2) go to a foreign country where the waitstaff get decent salaries and never recieve tips, (3) complain to restaurant owners and tell them to raise the salaries of the waitstaff-- by simply holding back a tip, you're focussing your annoyance at the wrong people. That is, you exploit workers who are already exploited by their management. As for the 15% gratuity charge, if you feel that your party of 8 or more has not received adequate service, you're well within your right to complain to the management. Any restaurant in their right mind will waive the charge. Remember, you're the consumer and a restaurant would rather calm an upset customer than have their reputation smeared. ["CraigBrozinsky"] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 62: </td> <td> Line 62: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ == Tipping on discounted items ==<br> + ["happy hour specials" Happy hours] are happy for the customers, but sad for servers. During happy hour, customers tend to order twice as much food, work the servers twice as hard, and innocently tip based on the discounted food. That means the server is getting one-fourth the tip they would for doing the same work at a sad-hour. Make sure to tip based on the normal price of the food, and do the same when using ["Discounts and Freebies" coupons].</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 63: </td> <td> Line 65: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + == Tipping for Delivered Food ==<br> + <br> + You order food for delivery and you're told that you'll be charged $1 or $2 for delivery. When the food guy/girl shows up, do you still tip them? By how much do you tip in this situation? How much do you tip when your not charged for delivery?<br> + <br> + Back when I worked at a pizza place, the buck they charged for delivery was to pay for the driver's gas expenses. So I guess it technically went to the driver, but only to offset the huge cost of driving around town in his own car. The expected tip in that situation was your standard 15%. Off of most pizza orders, that's only gonna be two to four bucks. It may be a bummer to shell out the extra cash, but at least you don't have to leave the house.<br> + </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 96: </td> <td> Line 105: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ---</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 99: </td> <td> Line 109: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- ----</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 101: </td> <td> Line 110: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- == Tipping for Delivered Food ==<br> - <br> - You order food for delivery and you're told that you'll be charged $1 or $2 for delivery. When the food guy/girl shows up, do you still tip them? By how much do you tip in this situation? How much do you tip when your not charged for delivery?<br> - <br> - Back when I worked at a pizza place, the buck they charged for delivery was to pay for the driver's gas expenses. So I guess it technically went to the driver, but only to offset the huge cost of driving around town in his own car. The expected tip in that situation was your standard 15%. Off of most pizza orders, that's only gonna be two to four bucks. It may be a bummer to shell out the extra cash, but at least you don't have to leave the house.</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2006-10-28 17:46:17JasonAller <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 48: </td> <td> Line 48: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * Policy is policy. I believe that it's the server's responsibility to make those policies as transparent to me as possible. You might notice as a worker (assume retail/service for the sake of discussion) that policies and procedures - P&amp;P to the initiated - are often on the forefront of your mind. But as a customer, what do you think when an employee tells you, "that's our policy"? I think, "I don't give a rat's ass WHAT your policies are. Take care of me however you have to and get me out of here." Thus, policy isn't as important as the way the server handles the situation. Take refills for example. My preference for a moderately priced resta<span>rau</span>nt is that the server refill soft drinks by bringing me a new one, in a new glass, before I finish the first one. Let's say policy dictates the the server has to give refills in the same glass (gross?). That's fine, just don't make me eat my ice before you come refill me! Extra charges -- as I said in my ["Mustard Seed"] comment, service was terrible there. Partly it's because she offered "ice water, sparkling water, or bottled water?" before we even sat. Sparkling sounded nice. It also cost like $9, a fact we hadn't been offered. I generally don't care what crap costs, just ''tell me''. Her service was just straight sleazy, right out of the car salesman's book. &lt;/rant&gt; --["DomenicSantangelo"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> * Policy is policy. I believe that it's the server's responsibility to make those policies as transparent to me as possible. You might notice as a worker (assume retail/service for the sake of discussion) that policies and procedures - P&amp;P to the initiated - are often on the forefront of your mind. But as a customer, what do you think when an employee tells you, "that's our policy"? I think, "I don't give a rat's ass WHAT your policies are. Take care of me however you have to and get me out of here." Thus, policy isn't as important as the way the server handles the situation. Take refills for example. My preference for a moderately priced resta<span>ura</span>nt is that the server refill soft drinks by bringing me a new one, in a new glass, before I finish the first one. Let's say policy dictates the the server has to give refills in the same glass (gross?). That's fine, just don't make me eat my ice before you come refill me! Extra charges -- as I said in my ["Mustard Seed"] comment, service was terrible there. Partly it's because she offered "ice water, sparkling water, or bottled water?" before we even sat. Sparkling sounded nice. It also cost like $9, a fact we hadn't been offered. I generally don't care what crap costs, just ''tell me''. Her service was just straight sleazy, right out of the car salesman's book. &lt;/rant&gt; --["DomenicSantangelo"] </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2006-10-19 19:27:49JasonAllerthier -&gt; their <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 50: </td> <td> Line 50: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * This city doesn't have places that offer less then minimum wage to servers, like some parts of the country do. That being the case, I don't care about th<span>ie</span>r living costs. Give me a break. I tip for service given, and I hate how so many people dislike the service but still give 15%. I've travelled, and have been to places where you do not tip servers, and the service is different indeed. But to constantly give a fixed amount as a rule-of-thumb is a bad idea in my opinion. It becomes something they routinely expect regardless of what's going on, and is no longer the incentive that I feel tipping was meant to be. It demeans the whole concept and becomes an additional service fee. I'm nearly in line with Mr. Pink nowadays. - -["EdwinSaada" Ed] </td> <td> <span>+</span> * This city doesn't have places that offer less then minimum wage to servers, like some parts of the country do. That being the case, I don't care about th<span>ei</span>r living costs. Give me a break. I tip for service given, and I hate how so many people dislike the service but still give 15%. I've travelled, and have been to places where you do not tip servers, and the service is different indeed. But to constantly give a fixed amount as a rule-of-thumb is a bad idea in my opinion. It becomes something they routinely expect regardless of what's going on, and is no longer the incentive that I feel tipping was meant to be. It demeans the whole concept and becomes an additional service fee. I'm nearly in line with Mr. Pink nowadays. - -["EdwinSaada" Ed] </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2006-08-12 00:13:47SonnyStack <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 105: </td> <td> Line 105: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ Back when I worked at a pizza place, the buck they charged for delivery was to pay for the driver's gas expenses. So I guess it technically went to the driver, but only to offset the huge cost of driving around town in his own car. The expected tip in that situation was your standard 15%. Off of most pizza orders, that's only gonna be two to four bucks. It may be a bummer to shell out the extra cash, but at least you don't have to leave the house.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2006-08-08 15:37:27EdwinSaada+comments bar <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 104: </td> <td> Line 104: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + [[Comments]]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2006-05-21 13:48:57JosephBleckman <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> This page is about gratuities. You may be looking for ["Cow Tipping"]. </td> <td> <span>+</span> This page is about gratuities. You may be looking for ["Cow Tipping"]<span>&nbsp;as the rates bovines get tipped at vary from region to region</span>.<span>&nbsp;Occasionally they prefer 30%, but others find that 0% is fine.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2006-05-21 11:19:07JoAnnaRichmakin that delivery general for all food <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 101: </td> <td> Line 101: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> == Tipping for Delivered <span>Pizzas</span> == </td> <td> <span>+</span> == Tipping for Delivered <span>Food</span> == </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 103: </td> <td> Line 103: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> You order <span>pizza</span> for delivery and you're told that you'll be charged $1 or $2 for delivery. When the <span>pizza</span> guy/girl shows up, do you still tip them? By how much do you tip in this situation? How much do you tip when your not charged for delivery? </td> <td> <span>+</span> You order <span>food</span> for delivery and you're told that you'll be charged $1 or $2 for delivery. When the <span>food</span> guy/girl shows up, do you still tip them? By how much do you tip in this situation? How much do you tip when your not charged for delivery? </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2006-05-21 11:18:18JoAnnaRichwhat about pizza delivery? <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 98: </td> <td> Line 98: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + ----<br> + <br> + == Tipping for Delivered Pizzas ==<br> + <br> + You order pizza for delivery and you're told that you'll be charged $1 or $2 for delivery. When the pizza guy/girl shows up, do you still tip them? By how much do you tip in this situation? How much do you tip when your not charged for delivery?</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2006-05-21 07:38:35JeffSpeckles <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 29: </td> <td> Line 29: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ''2005-09-15 15:07:33'' I think 15% for 8 or more is fair, but I disagree that the 12-15% range is usually considered the "right" amount to tip all waiters. I hate crappy waiters who don't deserve it. They don't get paid peanuts here in Davis. Yeah, it is legal to pay waiters less then minimum wage (as long as the amount of tips brings them to minimum wage), but no place in Davis does that. They all get at least minimum, most of them more. Tough job, this that, perhaps. But that doesn't warrant an automatic 15% just for doing their job. Somewhere in the last year or two I've become bitter towards undeserving waitstaff. It's not exploitation. Just as I can go to McDonalds or a foreign country, I could argue they could get a different job. (For the record, I do tip. Usually double the tax and then make it an even number. But still.) /rant --["EdwinSaada"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> ''2005-09-15 15:07:33'' I think 15% for 8 or more is fair, but I disagree that the 12-15% range is usually considered the "right" amount to tip all waiters. I hate crappy waiters who don't deserve it. They don't get paid peanuts here in Davis. Yeah, it is legal to pay waiters less then minimum wage (as long as the amount of tips brings them to minimum wage), but no place in Davis does that. <span>(It is notlegal to do that anywhere in the state of CA. --JS) </span>They all get at least minimum, most of them more. Tough job, this that, perhaps. But that doesn't warrant an automatic 15% just for doing their job. Somewhere in the last year or two I've become bitter towards undeserving waitstaff. It's not exploitation. Just as I can go to McDonalds or a foreign country, I could argue they could get a different job. (For the record, I do tip. Usually double the tax and then make it an even number. But still.) /rant --["EdwinSaada"] </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2006-05-21 07:32:33JeffSpeckles <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 10: </td> <td> Line 10: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + * After having read the links I fail to see how they are even relevant to what we are discussing. I thought we were discussing tipping vs. not tipping and service. Those links are to an article and an abstract, which describe a study of real customer satisfaction over a range of tip values......but they are all from tipping restaurants. There's no 'non-tipped' control to account for what we're talking about, unless I'm missing it. -["JeffSpeckles"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2006-05-19 00:49:11JeffSpeckles <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 9: </td> <td> Line 9: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * Thank you for the links. I haven't read them yet, but will. Bottom line is that my initial comment regarding the original post is still valid. Employers can't just raise wages. The money has to come from somewhere. Typical labor costs for a profitable restaurant can be as much as 25% of the gross. Likewise, a good server's tips might be double or triple the employer's wages. To compensate that.....well, do the math. It's impossible without the generosity of tipping. -["JeffSpeckles"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2006-05-18 14:29:04RaghavKrishnapriyan <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 8: </td> <td> Line 8: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * Having lived in and gone on extended visits to several countries without tipping (Japan? Singapore?), I can't agree. If you'd read the article, you'd see that he looks at tipping and service charges across countries; they're more correlated with things like unease about inequality than with quality of service. (I'd encourage you not to ignore it just because it disagrees with you, BTW.) As for fast-food restaurants, I don't see how that proves causation at all. In any case, anecdotal evidence tends to be pretty suspect with issues like this. Don't get me wrong: I tip, and I have no problem with the custom. I just don't think it's a very strong determinant of service (see [[http://www.news.cornell.edu/Chronicle/00/8.17.00/Lynn-tipping.html 1]] [[https://registration.ft.com/registration/barrier?referer=http://www.marginalrevolution.com/marginalrevolution/2005/04/what_do_we_know.html&amp;location=http%3A//news.ft.com/cms/s/be390fbe-a893-11d9-87a9-00000e2511c8.html 2]] [[http://www.hotelschool.cornell.edu/chr/research/inbrief/gratuity.html 3]].) -["RaghavKrishnapriyan" RK]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2006-05-18 12:05:47JeffSpeckles <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 7: </td> <td> Line 7: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * I don't need to read some PhD's opinion to know that is a load of bull. Service sucks in countries with no tipping. Likewise, go to a fast food restaurant where tipping doesn't exist. Again, service sucks in comparison. Americans are happy being waited on hand and foot, and are happy to pay <span>for it too</span>. Until that changes, 'meta-analyses' mean jack squat. -["JeffSpeckles"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> * I don't need to read some PhD's opinion to know that is a load of bull. Service sucks in countries with no tipping. Likewise, go to a fast food restaurant where tipping doesn't exist. Again, service sucks in comparison. Americans are happy being waited on hand and foot, and are happy to pay <span>extra for it too. If they weren't, customary tipping would end tommorrow</span>. Until that changes, 'meta-analyses' mean jack squat. -["JeffSpeckles"] </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2006-05-18 12:02:38JeffSpeckles <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 7: </td> <td> Line 7: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * I don't need to read some PhD's opinion to know that is a load of bull. Service sucks in countries with no tipping. Likewise, go to a fast food restaurant where tipping doesn't exist. Again, service sucks in comparison. Americans are happy being waited on hand and foot, and are happy to pay for it too. Until that changes, 'meta-analyses' mean jack squat. -["JeffSpeckles"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2006-05-18 11:52:50RaghavKrishnapriyan <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> The rule-of-thumb is that one should [wiki:WikiPedia:Tipping tip] 15%. Others feel it should be less for poor service, and more for excellent service. In some countries, tipping is never done. Many establishments have all the workers pool their tips, and then divy them out again. Some industries have grown to expect tips (restaurants, hotel staff, etc.), yet others rarely get tips. Some think this is unfair. Why give $5 to a person just to deliver carry a plate 15 feet, when the mechanic who struggled (and cursed) for 30 minutes to replace your water pump doesn't get one? (Not to mention the homeless guy standing outside the door who would love to make $5 for carrying your plate 15 feet...) Have you bent over backwards for some customers, but received no tip, because you weren't in a "tipping business"? Better that the business pay the waiter (or whomever) the proper wages, charge the proper prices, and have all tips be entirely voluntary, like the tips jar at the cafe. If people didn't tip, the employers would ''have'' to raise wages due to market forces.<span>&nbsp;(</span>This is a complete misunderstanding of the economics involved. Restaurants would not raise their wages. They can't afford it. Compare the number of employees at a nice restaurant to, say, Jack in the Box. You'll have 2 or 3 times as many people (labor costs) serving the same number of customers on average. Average nice restaurant spends 10-15% of its gross on labor costs, so imagine doubling or tripling that to compete with a tipped position. Take away tips and you would lose the good employees that are in demand of a higher paying job and gain the types of folks who work for minimum wage. End tips, end good service. Simple as that. Or the restaurant could just raise their prices and pass the price right back to you.["JeffSpeckles"]<span>) </span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> The rule-of-thumb is that one should [wiki:WikiPedia:Tipping tip] 15%. Others feel it should be less for poor service, and more for excellent service. In some countries, tipping is never done. Many establishments have all the workers pool their tips, and then divy them out again. Some industries have grown to expect tips (restaurants, hotel staff, etc.), yet others rarely get tips. Some think this is unfair. Why give $5 to a person just to deliver carry a plate 15 feet, when the mechanic who struggled (and cursed) for 30 minutes to replace your water pump doesn't get one? (Not to mention the homeless guy standing outside the door who would love to make $5 for carrying your plate 15 feet...) Have you bent over backwards for some customers, but received no tip, because you weren't in a "tipping business"? Better that the business pay the waiter (or whomever) the proper wages, charge the proper prices, and have all tips be entirely voluntary, like the tips jar at the cafe. If people didn't tip, the employers would ''have'' to raise wages due to market forces.<span><br> + <br> + *</span>This is a complete misunderstanding of the economics involved. Restaurants would not raise their wages. They can't afford it. Compare the number of employees at a nice restaurant to, say, Jack in the Box. You'll have 2 or 3 times as many people (labor costs) serving the same number of customers on average. Average nice restaurant spends 10-15% of its gross on labor costs, so imagine doubling or tripling that to compete with a tipped position. Take away tips and you would lose the good employees that are in demand of a higher paying job and gain the types of folks who work for minimum wage. End tips, end good service. Simple as that. Or the restaurant could just raise their prices and pass the price right back to you.["JeffSpeckles"]<span><br> + * See Michael Lynn's 2000 paper "Gratitude and Gratuity: a meta-analysis of research on the service-tipping relationship" in ''Journal of Socio-Economics''—the relationship between tipping and quality of service is pretty weak. -["RaghavKrishnapriyan"]</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 31: </td> <td> Line 34: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ''2005-10-28 10:22:45'' [[nbsp]] Here's my practice:<span>&nbsp;</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> ''2005-10-28 10:22:45'' [[nbsp]] Here's my practice: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 33: </td> <td> Line 36: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> *If I have no complaints about service (everything came out in a timely manner, server asked to refill drinks appropriately) then I double the tax and round up.<span>&nbsp;</span><br> <span>-</span> *If the service was bad (no drink refills, no 'how is everything?', food comes out slowly with no update from the server), I drop the tip WAY down, usually to about 5%.<span>&nbsp;</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> *If I have no complaints about service (everything came out in a timely manner, server asked to refill drinks appropriately) then I double the tax and round up.<br> <span>+</span> *If the service was bad (no drink refills, no 'how is everything?', food comes out slowly with no update from the server), I drop the tip WAY down, usually to about 5%. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 69: </td> <td> Line 72: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Nice Guy Eddie: I'd go over twelve percent for that.<span>&nbsp;</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> Nice Guy Eddie: I'd go over twelve percent for that. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 76: </td> <td> Line 79: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> (Mr. Pink rubs two of his fingers together.)<span>&nbsp;</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> (Mr. Pink rubs two of his fingers together.) </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 82: </td> <td> Line 85: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> (They all laugh.)<span>&nbsp;</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> (They all laugh.) </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2006-01-24 17:46:27KrisFrickewhat about when the person helping you is the owner? <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 89: </td> <td> Line 89: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ What if the person serving you IS the owner? For example, the ["University Haircutters" barber in the basement], John Salido -- he's a very nice man and an excellent barber, but I feel weird tipping him because he's the owner and thus all the money goes to him anyway.. and I probably need the money more than him. -["KrisFricke"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2006-01-24 16:43:30RocksandDirtdrink tip comment <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 52: </td> <td> Line 52: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ I typically leave an extra buck per drink. depending upon the place and the service. if it is a really nice place, I typically leave less. Though when loaded I have left lots more. --["rocksanddirt"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2006-01-24 13:57:01JeffSpeckles <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> The rule-of-thumb is that one should [wiki:WikiPedia:Tipping tip] 15%. Others feel it should be less for poor service, and more for excellent service. In some countries, tipping is never done. Many establishments have all the workers pool their tips, and then divy them out again. Some industries have grown to expect tips (restaurants, hotel staff, etc.), yet others rarely get tips. Some think this is unfair. Why give $5 to a person just to deliver carry a plate 15 feet, when the mechanic who struggled (and cursed) for 30 minutes to replace your water pump doesn't get one? (Not to mention the homeless guy standing outside the door who would love to make $5 for carrying your plate 15 feet...) Have you bent over backwards for some customers, but received no tip, because you weren't in a "tipping business"? Better that the business pay the waiter (or whomever) the proper wages, charge the proper prices, and have all tips be entirely voluntary, like the tips jar at the cafe. If people didn't tip, the employers would ''have'' to raise wages due to market forces. </td> <td> <span>+</span> The rule-of-thumb is that one should [wiki:WikiPedia:Tipping tip] 15%. Others feel it should be less for poor service, and more for excellent service. In some countries, tipping is never done. Many establishments have all the workers pool their tips, and then divy them out again. Some industries have grown to expect tips (restaurants, hotel staff, etc.), yet others rarely get tips. Some think this is unfair. Why give $5 to a person just to deliver carry a plate 15 feet, when the mechanic who struggled (and cursed) for 30 minutes to replace your water pump doesn't get one? (Not to mention the homeless guy standing outside the door who would love to make $5 for carrying your plate 15 feet...) Have you bent over backwards for some customers, but received no tip, because you weren't in a "tipping business"? Better that the business pay the waiter (or whomever) the proper wages, charge the proper prices, and have all tips be entirely voluntary, like the tips jar at the cafe. If people didn't tip, the employers would ''have'' to raise wages due to market forces.<span>&nbsp;(This is a complete misunderstanding of the economics involved. Restaurants would not raise their wages. They can't afford it. Compare the number of employees at a nice restaurant to, say, Jack in the Box. You'll have 2 or 3 times as many people (labor costs) serving the same number of customers on average. Average nice restaurant spends 10-15% of its gross on labor costs, so imagine doubling or tripling that to compete with a tipped position. Take away tips and you would lose the good employees that are in demand of a higher paying job and gain the types of folks who work for minimum wage. End tips, end good service. Simple as that. Or the restaurant could just raise their prices and pass the price right back to you.["JeffSpeckles"]) </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 14: </td> <td> Line 14: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + Yay! Well said. ["JeffSpeckles"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2006-01-24 12:31:22ArlenAbraham <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 47: </td> <td> Line 47: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ == Tipping for Drinks ==<br> + How much do you guys typically tip for drinks?<br> + <br> + <br> + ----</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2006-01-24 09:25:25CraigBrozinskydelivery tipping speculation <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 8: </td> <td> Line 8: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * That's a really good question, and is one of the reasons I don't like getting things delivered. My guess is that the delivery fee goes to the owners, not to the delivery person. If that's true, you should tip. ["CraigBrozinsky"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2006-01-23 20:39:03JoAnnaRichquestion on tipping <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 6: </td> <td> Line 6: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + ''If there is a delivery charge already included, do you still tip?'' -- ["JoAnnaRich" JR]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2005-11-19 15:15:59EdwinSaadamr pink <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 36: </td> <td> Line 36: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + * This city doesn't have places that offer less then minimum wage to servers, like some parts of the country do. That being the case, I don't care about thier living costs. Give me a break. I tip for service given, and I hate how so many people dislike the service but still give 15%. I've travelled, and have been to places where you do not tip servers, and the service is different indeed. But to constantly give a fixed amount as a rule-of-thumb is a bad idea in my opinion. It becomes something they routinely expect regardless of what's going on, and is no longer the incentive that I feel tipping was meant to be. It demeans the whole concept and becomes an additional service fee. I'm nearly in line with Mr. Pink nowadays. - -["EdwinSaada" Ed]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2005-10-31 10:39:21DomenicSantangeloreply, format. <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 32: </td> <td> Line 32: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> I consider the Tip to be a feedback mechanism. If I routinely tip the same amount, the server will never get any feedback. If I tip the same amount and give verbal feedback, the server will not listen because they know they get tipped the same amount anyway. Consequently, money speaks.<span><br> - </span> --["DomenicSantangelo"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> I consider the Tip to be a feedback mechanism. If I routinely tip the same amount, the server will never get any feedback. If I tip the same amount and give verbal feedback, the server will not listen because they know they get tipped the same amount anyway. Consequently, money speaks. --["DomenicSantangelo"] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 36: </td> <td> Line 35: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> * Policy is policy. I believe that it's the server's responsibility to make those policies as transparent to me as possible. You might notice as a worker (assume retail/service for the sake of discussion) that policies and procedures - P&amp;P to the initiated - are often on the forefront of your mind. But as a customer, what do you think when an employee tells you, "that's our policy"? I think, "I don't give a rat's ass WHAT your policies are. Take care of me however you have to and get me out of here." Thus, policy isn't as important as the way the server handles the situation. Take refills for example. My preference for a moderately priced restaraunt is that the server refill soft drinks by bringing me a new one, in a new glass, before I finish the first one. Let's say policy dictates the the server has to give refills in the same glass (gross?). That's fine, just don't make me eat my ice before you come refill me! Extra charges -- as I said in my ["Mustard Seed"] comment, service was terrible there. Partly it's because she offered "ice water, sparkling water, or bottled water?" before we even sat. Sparkling sounded nice. It also cost like $9, a fact we hadn't been offered. I generally don't care what crap costs, just ''tell me''. Her service was just straight sleazy, right out of the car salesman's book. &lt;/rant&gt;<span><br> -</span> --["DomenicSantangelo"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> * Policy is policy. I believe that it's the server's responsibility to make those policies as transparent to me as possible. You might notice as a worker (assume retail/service for the sake of discussion) that policies and procedures - P&amp;P to the initiated - are often on the forefront of your mind. But as a customer, what do you think when an employee tells you, "that's our policy"? I think, "I don't give a rat's ass WHAT your policies are. Take care of me however you have to and get me out of here." Thus, policy isn't as important as the way the server handles the situation. Take refills for example. My preference for a moderately priced restaraunt is that the server refill soft drinks by bringing me a new one, in a new glass, before I finish the first one. Let's say policy dictates the the server has to give refills in the same glass (gross?). That's fine, just don't make me eat my ice before you come refill me! Extra charges -- as I said in my ["Mustard Seed"] comment, service was terrible there. Partly it's because she offered "ice water, sparkling water, or bottled water?" before we even sat. Sparkling sounded nice. It also cost like $9, a fact we hadn't been offered. I generally don't care what crap costs, just ''tell me''. Her service was just straight sleazy, right out of the car salesman's book. &lt;/rant&gt; --["DomenicSantangelo"] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 39: </td> <td> Line 37: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- </span><br> <span>-</span> Question: If you plan on tipping a barista with change, like $5 for a $4.50 mocha, should you wait till she gives you the change and put it in the cup, or tell her to keep the change.<br> <span>- <br> - </span> </td> <td> <span>+ ----</span><br> <span>+</span> Question: If you plan on tipping a barista with change, like $5 for a $4.50 mocha, should you wait till she gives you the change and put it in the cup, or tell her to keep the change<span>? --["ApolloStumpy"]<br> + * I wouldn't say "keep the change" unless I'm paying with a $20 or something</span>.<span>&nbsp;I think it sounds kind of mean to say "keep the change" to $0.50. I usually just take the change and dump it in the tipjar, or hand them the money and walk away if I'm leaving the change as a tip. --["DomenicSantangelo"]</span><br> <span>+ ----</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 77: </td> <td> Line 75: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- --["ApolloStumpy"]</span> </td> <td> <span>+ </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2005-10-30 21:05:26ApolloStumpyreorg, and q <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 6: </td> <td> Line 6: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + <br> + == Mandatory service charges for large groups ==<br> + <br> + I think this is a reasonable policy. First, 15% gratuity is the minimum tip you should give provided the waitstaff doesn't majorly screw up. Second, most waitstaff get paid peanuts by the restaurant, and make their money primarily from tips. The 15% surcharge guarantees that the waitstaff get just compensation for a particularly heavy workload. If you disagree with these policies, you have these options (1) eat at McDonalds, (2) go to a foreign country where the waitstaff get decent salaries and never recieve tips, (3) complain to restaurant owners and tell them to raise the salaries of the waitstaff-- by simply holding back a tip, you're focussing your annoyance at the wrong people. That is, you exploit workers who are already exploited by their management. As for the 15% gratuity charge, if you feel that your party of 8 or more has not received adequate service, you're well within your right to complain to the management. Any restaurant in their right mind will waive the charge. Remember, you're the consumer and a restaurant would rather calm an upset customer than have their reputation smeared. ["CraigBrozinsky"]<br> + ------<br> + If such policies were not in place the server would make less money than if the party weren't there. A big top takes more time to manage as a server, and the other tables in his/her section can suffer because of it, probably costing the server additional tips. Large groups are usually not paid for by a single individual, so in many groups there will usually be the one person in the group who will contribute less than their fair share. As a result a server would get a smaller tip because of the cheapskate in the group. A server is very likely to get more money off of 2 four tops than a single eight top. --["RogerClark"]<br> + ------<br> + OK, my observation is on the poor comparison. A mechanic is paid for the parts AND the labor as 2 separate charges. At a restaurant food and service are combined into a single charge and are not as easy to separate. The other issue is that mechanics charge around $70-75/hr for labor. While that labor rate covers overhead as well as wages, I am sure a mechanic doesn't work for minimum wage. - ["RogerClark"]<br> + ------<br> + ''2005-09-15 15:07:33'' I think 15% for 8 or more is fair, but I disagree that the 12-15% range is usually considered the "right" amount to tip all waiters. I hate crappy waiters who don't deserve it. They don't get paid peanuts here in Davis. Yeah, it is legal to pay waiters less then minimum wage (as long as the amount of tips brings them to minimum wage), but no place in Davis does that. They all get at least minimum, most of them more. Tough job, this that, perhaps. But that doesn't warrant an automatic 15% just for doing their job. Somewhere in the last year or two I've become bitter towards undeserving waitstaff. It's not exploitation. Just as I can go to McDonalds or a foreign country, I could argue they could get a different job. (For the record, I do tip. Usually double the tax and then make it an even number. But still.) /rant --["EdwinSaada"]<br> + "Crappy waiters who don't deserve it" is kind of a loaded term. Service can be bad for one of two reasons. One, the server is incompetent, slow, or just neglects you. These folks should be given a low tip. There are also servers that bust their and are required to wait about two times as many tables as they should. If you give this latter group a crappy tip, the server is getting shat on by both the management and the customer. For situations where things are beyond the control of the server, I think it important to complain to the management, ask for some discount on your food, and give the server a reasonable tip. I did this the other night at ["Bistro 33"]. --["CraigBrozinsky"]<br> + ------<br> + Fixed gratuities for parties of 8 or more are used because quite often a waiter will be servicing only one table if it is 8 or more. no tip or a small tip could mean thats all they get for the night. tips are often taken into account when calculating how much a waiter makes in salary. to the comment that they are allready making a wad of money for having you eat there, the gratuity never goes to the restraunt but actually goes to the waiter. this practice usually is only reserved for upscale places. usually i tip well and if there is desent service 15% is less than what i give. my revenge is that if they put the charge i dont ad the extra 3% i would normally give. -["MattHh"]<br> + <br> + [http://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/FAQ_TipsAndGratutities.htm Note (6)] that these are considered the employer's property and not the employee's property. The employer may give the workers 10%, 5%, or nothing at all if they choose.<br> + <br> + == To tip flat 15% or according to service quality ==<br> + Variable argument: This may encourage the server to provide better service. Fixed argument: Perhaps the server is working as hard as they can, but just aren't any good. Their living costs are fixed (they can't pay less to their landlord for crappy service, can they?), so they should get the same regardless.<br> + <br> + ''2005-10-28 10:22:45'' [[nbsp]] Here's my practice: <br> + *If the service is excellent (refills are assumed and brought out in new glasses before I'm done with the drink I'm working on, food arrives hot and fresh, server comes back to make sure everything is alright) then I tip 20-25%. If the service is truly exeptional (bringing extras without being asked, being extra on-the-ball) I have been known to tip between 75-100% because it is exceptionally rare.<br> + *If I have no complaints about service (everything came out in a timely manner, server asked to refill drinks appropriately) then I double the tax and round up. <br> + *If the service was bad (no drink refills, no 'how is everything?', food comes out slowly with no update from the server), I drop the tip WAY down, usually to about 5%. <br> + *If the service was just terrible (extra charges for things I feel should have been free - like water, takes a long time to get seated and a long time to get the order taken even when the resteraunt is visibly slow, etc) I do not tip at all and I leave a note saying why if I didn't get a chance to tell the server in person.<br> + <br> + I consider the Tip to be a feedback mechanism. If I routinely tip the same amount, the server will never get any feedback. If I tip the same amount and give verbal feedback, the server will not listen because they know they get tipped the same amount anyway. Consequently, money speaks.<br> + --["DomenicSantangelo"]<br> + <br> + * Some of these things (such as extras, how refills are handled, and extra charges) may be restaurant policy rather than good or bad service on the part of the individual server. Do you take this into account when determining the tip? --["JessicaLuedtke"]<br> + * Policy is policy. I believe that it's the server's responsibility to make those policies as transparent to me as possible. You might notice as a worker (assume retail/service for the sake of discussion) that policies and procedures - P&amp;P to the initiated - are often on the forefront of your mind. But as a customer, what do you think when an employee tells you, "that's our policy"? I think, "I don't give a rat's ass WHAT your policies are. Take care of me however you have to and get me out of here." Thus, policy isn't as important as the way the server handles the situation. Take refills for example. My preference for a moderately priced restaraunt is that the server refill soft drinks by bringing me a new one, in a new glass, before I finish the first one. Let's say policy dictates the the server has to give refills in the same glass (gross?). That's fine, just don't make me eat my ice before you come refill me! Extra charges -- as I said in my ["Mustard Seed"] comment, service was terrible there. Partly it's because she offered "ice water, sparkling water, or bottled water?" before we even sat. Sparkling sounded nice. It also cost like $9, a fact we hadn't been offered. I generally don't care what crap costs, just ''tell me''. Her service was just straight sleazy, right out of the car salesman's book. &lt;/rant&gt;<br> + --["DomenicSantangelo"]<br> + <br> + <br> + Question: If you plan on tipping a barista with change, like $5 for a $4.50 mocha, should you wait till she gives you the change and put it in the cup, or tell her to keep the change.<br> + <br> + </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 41: </td> <td> Line 78: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- <br> - == Mandatory service charges for large groups ==<br> - <br> - I think this is a reasonable policy. First, 15% gratuity is the minimum tip you should give provided the waitstaff doesn't majorly screw up. Second, most waitstaff get paid peanuts by the restaurant, and make their money primarily from tips. The 15% surcharge guarantees that the waitstaff get just compensation for a particularly heavy workload. If you disagree with these policies, you have these options (1) eat at McDonalds, (2) go to a foreign country where the waitstaff get decent salaries and never recieve tips, (3) complain to restaurant owners and tell them to raise the salaries of the waitstaff-- by simply holding back a tip, you're focussing your annoyance at the wrong people. That is, you exploit workers who are already exploited by their management. As for the 15% gratuity charge, if you feel that your party of 8 or more has not received adequate service, you're well within your right to complain to the management. Any restaurant in their right mind will waive the charge. Remember, you're the consumer and a restaurant would rather calm an upset customer than have their reputation smeared. ["CraigBrozinsky"]<br> - ------<br> - If such policies were not in place the server would make less money than if the party weren't there. A big top takes more time to manage as a server, and the other tables in his/her section can suffer because of it, probably costing the server additional tips. Large groups are usually not paid for by a single individual, so in many groups there will usually be the one person in the group who will contribute less than their fair share. As a result a server would get a smaller tip because of the cheapskate in the group. A server is very likely to get more money off of 2 four tops than a single eight top. --["RogerClark"]<br> - ------<br> - OK, my observation is on the poor comparison. A mechanic is paid for the parts AND the labor as 2 separate charges. At a restaurant food and service are combined into a single charge and are not as easy to separate. The other issue is that mechanics charge around $70-75/hr for labor. While that labor rate covers overhead as well as wages, I am sure a mechanic doesn't work for minimum wage. - ["RogerClark"]<br> - ------<br> - ''2005-09-15 15:07:33'' I think 15% for 8 or more is fair, but I disagree that the 12-15% range is usually considered the "right" amount to tip all waiters. I hate crappy waiters who don't deserve it. They don't get paid peanuts here in Davis. Yeah, it is legal to pay waiters less then minimum wage (as long as the amount of tips brings them to minimum wage), but no place in Davis does that. They all get at least minimum, most of them more. Tough job, this that, perhaps. But that doesn't warrant an automatic 15% just for doing their job. Somewhere in the last year or two I've become bitter towards undeserving waitstaff. It's not exploitation. Just as I can go to McDonalds or a foreign country, I could argue they could get a different job. (For the record, I do tip. Usually double the tax and then make it an even number. But still.) /rant --["EdwinSaada"]<br> - "Crappy waiters who don't deserve it" is kind of a loaded term. Service can be bad for one of two reasons. One, the server is incompetent, slow, or just neglects you. These folks should be given a low tip. There are also servers that bust their and are required to wait about two times as many tables as they should. If you give this latter group a crappy tip, the server is getting shat on by both the management and the customer. For situations where things are beyond the control of the server, I think it important to complain to the management, ask for some discount on your food, and give the server a reasonable tip. I did this the other night at ["Bistro 33"]. --["CraigBrozinsky"]<br> - ------<br> - Fixed gratuities for parties of 8 or more are used because quite often a waiter will be servicing only one table if it is 8 or more. no tip or a small tip could mean thats all they get for the night. tips are often taken into account when calculating how much a waiter makes in salary. to the comment that they are allready making a wad of money for having you eat there, the gratuity never goes to the restraunt but actually goes to the waiter. this practice usually is only reserved for upscale places. usually i tip well and if there is desent service 15% is less than what i give. my revenge is that if they put the charge i dont ad the extra 3% i would normally give. -["MattHh"]<br> - <br> - [http://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/FAQ_TipsAndGratutities.htm Note (6)] that these are considered the employer's property and not the employee's property. The employer may give the workers 10%, 5%, or nothing at all if they choose.<br> - <br> - == To tip flat 15% or according to service quality ==<br> - Variable argument: This may encourage the server to provide better service. Fixed argument: Perhaps the server is working as hard as they can, but just aren't any good. Their living costs are fixed (they can't pay less to their landlord for crappy service, can they?), so they should get the same regardless.<br> - <br> - ''2005-10-28 10:22:45'' [[nbsp]] Here's my practice: <br> - *If the service is excellent (refills are assumed and brought out in new glasses before I'm done with the drink I'm working on, food arrives hot and fresh, server comes back to make sure everything is alright) then I tip 20-25%. If the service is truly exeptional (bringing extras without being asked, being extra on-the-ball) I have been known to tip between 75-100% because it is exceptionally rare.<br> - *If I have no complaints about service (everything came out in a timely manner, server asked to refill drinks appropriately) then I double the tax and round up. <br> - *If the service was bad (no drink refills, no 'how is everything?', food comes out slowly with no update from the server), I drop the tip WAY down, usually to about 5%. <br> - *If the service was just terrible (extra charges for things I feel should have been free - like water, takes a long time to get seated and a long time to get the order taken even when the resteraunt is visibly slow, etc) I do not tip at all and I leave a note saying why if I didn't get a chance to tell the server in person.<br> - <br> - I consider the Tip to be a feedback mechanism. If I routinely tip the same amount, the server will never get any feedback. If I tip the same amount and give verbal feedback, the server will not listen because they know they get tipped the same amount anyway. Consequently, money speaks.<br> - --["DomenicSantangelo"]<br> - <br> - * Some of these things (such as extras, how refills are handled, and extra charges) may be restaurant policy rather than good or bad service on the part of the individual server. Do you take this into account when determining the tip? --["JessicaLuedtke"]<br> - * Policy is policy. I believe that it's the server's responsibility to make those policies as transparent to me as possible. You might notice as a worker (assume retail/service for the sake of discussion) that policies and procedures - P&amp;P to the initiated - are often on the forefront of your mind. But as a customer, what do you think when an employee tells you, "that's our policy"? I think, "I don't give a rat's ass WHAT your policies are. Take care of me however you have to and get me out of here." Thus, policy isn't as important as the way the server handles the situation. Take refills for example. My preference for a moderately priced restaraunt is that the server refill soft drinks by bringing me a new one, in a new glass, before I finish the first one. Let's say policy dictates the the server has to give refills in the same glass (gross?). That's fine, just don't make me eat my ice before you come refill me! Extra charges -- as I said in my ["Mustard Seed"] comment, service was terrible there. Partly it's because she offered "ice water, sparkling water, or bottled water?" before we even sat. Sparkling sounded nice. It also cost like $9, a fact we hadn't been offered. I generally don't care what crap costs, just ''tell me''. Her service was just straight sleazy, right out of the car salesman's book. &lt;/rant&gt;<br> - --["DomenicSantangelo"]</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2005-10-30 20:38:48DomenicSantangeloreply <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 70: </td> <td> Line 70: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- ------<br> - If you go to a poor foreign country...i.e. any Slavic or Southeastern ["Asian"] countries and give a tip worth $1 US, the wait staff will practically have ["sex"] with you (see ["prostitution"]). --["ApolloStumpy"]</span> </td> <td> <span>+ * Policy is policy. I believe that it's the server's responsibility to make those policies as transparent to me as possible. You might notice as a worker (assume retail/service for the sake of discussion) that policies and procedures - P&amp;P to the initiated - are often on the forefront of your mind. But as a customer, what do you think when an employee tells you, "that's our policy"? I think, "I don't give a rat's ass WHAT your policies are. Take care of me however you have to and get me out of here." Thus, policy isn't as important as the way the server handles the situation. Take refills for example. My preference for a moderately priced restaraunt is that the server refill soft drinks by bringing me a new one, in a new glass, before I finish the first one. Let's say policy dictates the the server has to give refills in the same glass (gross?). That's fine, just don't make me eat my ice before you come refill me! Extra charges -- as I said in my ["Mustard Seed"] comment, service was terrible there. Partly it's because she offered "ice water, sparkling water, or bottled water?" before we even sat. Sparkling sounded nice. It also cost like $9, a fact we hadn't been offered. I generally don't care what crap costs, just ''tell me''. Her service was just straight sleazy, right out of the car salesman's book. &lt;/rant&gt;<br> + --["DomenicSantangelo"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2005-10-30 20:18:46JasonAller <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 43: </td> <td> Line 43: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 44: </td> <td> Line 45: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- </span> </td> <td> <span>+ ------</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 46: </td> <td> Line 47: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- </span><br> <span>-</span> OK, my obsevation is on the poor comparison. A mechanic is paid for the parts AND the labor as 2 separate charges. At a restaurant food and service are combined into a single charge and are not as easy to separate. The other issue is that mechanics charge around $70-75/hr for labor. While that labor rate covers overhead as well as wages, I am sure a mechanic doesn't work for minimum wage. - ["RogerClark"]<br> <span>- </span><br> <span>-</span> ''2005-09-15 15:07:33'' I think 15% for 8 or more is fair, but I disagree that the 12-15% range is usually considered the "right" amount to tip all waiters. I hate crappy waiters who don't deserve it. They don't get paid peanuts here in Davis. Yeah, it is legal to pay waiters less then minimum wage (as long as the amount of tips brings them to minimum wage), but no place in Davis does that. They all get at least minimum, most of them more. Tough job, this that, perhaps. But that doesn't warrant an automatic 15% just for doing th<span>ie</span>r job. Somewhere in the last year or two I've become bitter towards undeserving waitstaff. It's not exploitation. Just as I can go to McDonalds or a foreign country, I could argue they could get a different job. (For the record, I do tip. Usually double the tax and then make it an even number. But still.) /rant --["EdwinSaada"] </td> <td> <span>+ ------</span><br> <span>+</span> OK, my obse<span>r</span>vation is on the poor comparison. A mechanic is paid for the parts AND the labor as 2 separate charges. At a restaurant food and service are combined into a single charge and are not as easy to separate. The other issue is that mechanics charge around $70-75/hr for labor. While that labor rate covers overhead as well as wages, I am sure a mechanic doesn't work for minimum wage. - ["RogerClark"]<br> <span>+ ------</span><br> <span>+</span> ''2005-09-15 15:07:33'' I think 15% for 8 or more is fair, but I disagree that the 12-15% range is usually considered the "right" amount to tip all waiters. I hate crappy waiters who don't deserve it. They don't get paid peanuts here in Davis. Yeah, it is legal to pay waiters less then minimum wage (as long as the amount of tips brings them to minimum wage), but no place in Davis does that. They all get at least minimum, most of them more. Tough job, this that, perhaps. But that doesn't warrant an automatic 15% just for doing th<span>ei</span>r job. Somewhere in the last year or two I've become bitter towards undeserving waitstaff. It's not exploitation. Just as I can go to McDonalds or a foreign country, I could argue they could get a different job. (For the record, I do tip. Usually double the tax and then make it an even number. But still.) /rant --["EdwinSaada"] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 51: </td> <td> Line 52: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- </span> </td> <td> <span>+ ------</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2005-10-29 21:35:52JasonAllerAttributing words hardly worth standing behind <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 69: </td> <td> Line 69: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- </span><br> <span>-</span> If you go to a poor foreign country...i.e. any Slavic or Southeastern ["Asian"] countries and give a tip worth $1 US, the wait staff will practically have ["sex"] with you (see ["prostitution"]). </td> <td> <span>+ ------</span><br> <span>+</span> If you go to a poor foreign country...i.e. any Slavic or Southeastern ["Asian"] countries and give a tip worth $1 US, the wait staff will practically have ["sex"] with you (see ["prostitution"]).<span>&nbsp;--["ApolloStumpy"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2005-10-29 21:31:01ApolloStumpy <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 69: </td> <td> Line 69: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + If you go to a poor foreign country...i.e. any Slavic or Southeastern ["Asian"] countries and give a tip worth $1 US, the wait staff will practically have ["sex"] with you (see ["prostitution"]).</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2005-10-29 18:00:39SteveDavisonout of context now <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 55: </td> <td> Line 55: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- * Read item 6 more carefully. This is why employees may make much less for large groups than if each was left to their own.</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2005-10-29 15:59:32JaimeRabacomment retracted. didn't notice we were talking about service charges. <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 55: </td> <td> Line 55: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- * Well the link above seems to indicate the contrary. It seems that tips belong exclusively to the exmployees and may not be deducted from pay, nor diminished except by a pooling arrangement with other employees. -["JaimeRaba" jr]</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2005-10-29 09:45:29SteveDavison <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 54: </td> <td> Line 54: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> [http://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/FAQ_TipsAndGratutities.htm Note] that these are considered the employer's property and not the employee's property. The employer may give the workers 10%, 5%, or nothing at all if they choose. </td> <td> <span>+</span> [http://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/FAQ_TipsAndGratutities.htm Note<span>&nbsp;(6)</span>] that these are considered the employer's property and not the employee's property. The employer may give the workers 10%, 5%, or nothing at all if they choose. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 56: </td> <td> Line 56: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * Read item 6 more carefully. This is why employees may make much less for large groups than if each was left to their own.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2005-10-29 08:52:12ApolloStumpyfinished the scene <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 25: </td> <td> Line 25: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- Nice Guy Eddie: Excuse me, Mr. Pink, but I think the last fucking thing you need is another cup of coffee.}}}</span> </td> <td> <span>+ Nice Guy Eddie: Excuse me, Mr. Pink, but I think the last fucking thing you need is another cup of coffee.<br> + MR. PINK: Jesus Christ - I mean these ladies aren't starving to death. They make minimum wage. You know, I used to work minimum wage. And when I did, I wasn't lucky enough to have a job society deemed tip-worthy.<br> + MR. BLUE: You don't care they're counting on your tips to live?<br> + (Mr. Pink rubs two of his fingers together.) <br> + MR. PINK: You know what this is? It's the world's smallest violin playing just for the waitresses.<br> + MR. WHITE: You don't have any idea what you're talking about. These people bust their ass. This is a hard job.<br> + MR. PINK: So's working at McDonald's, but you don't feel the need to tip them, do you? Why not? They're servin ya food. But no, society says don't tip these guys over here, but tip these guys over here. That's bullshit.<br> + MR. WHITE: Waitressing is the number one occupation for female noncollege graduates in this country. It's the one job basically any woman can get and make a living on. The reason is because of their tips.<br> + MR. PINK: (pauses) Fuck all that.<br> + (They all laugh.) <br> + MR. BROWN: Jesus Christ!<br> + MR. PINK: Hey, I'm very sorry that the government taxes their tips. That's fucked up. That ain't my fault. It would appear that waitresses are just one of the many groups the government fucks in the ass on a regular basis. You show me a paper says the government shouldn't do that, I'll sign it. Put it to a vote, I'll vote for it. But what I won't do is play ball. And this non-college bullshit you're giving me, I got two words for that: "Learn to fuckin type." Cause if you're expecting me to help out with the rent, you're in for a big fuckin' surprise.<br> + MR. ORANGE: Hey - he's convinced me. Give me my dollar back.<br> + EDDIE: Hey! Leave the dollars there.}}}<br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2005-10-29 02:10:10JaimeRaba <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 40: </td> <td> Line 40: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- [</span>[http://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/FAQ_TipsAndGratutities.htm Note] that these are considered the employer's property and not the employee's property. The employer may give the workers 10%, 5%, or nothing at all if they choose. </td> <td> <span>+ </span>[http://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/FAQ_TipsAndGratutities.htm Note] that these are considered the employer's property and not the employee's property. The employer may give the workers 10%, 5%, or nothing at all if they choose.<span><br> + * Well the link above seems to indicate the contrary. It seems that tips belong exclusively to the exmployees and may not be deducted from pay, nor diminished except by a pooling arrangement with other employees. -["JaimeRaba" jr]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2005-10-28 16:14:51AndrewChenHilarious <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ This page is about gratuities. You may be looking for ["Cow Tipping"].<br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2005-10-28 13:58:48SteveDavisonformatting <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> The rule-of-thumb is that one should [wiki:WikiPedia:Tipping tip] 15%. Others feel it should be less for poor service, and more for excellent service. In some countries, tipping is never done. Many establishments have all the workers pool their tips, and then divy them out again. Some industries have grown to expect tips (restaurants, hotel staff, etc.), yet others rarely get tips. Some think this is unfair. Why give $5 to a person just to deliver carry a plate 15 feet, when the mechanic who struggled (and cursed) for 30 minutes to replace your water pump doesn't get one? (Not to mention the homeless guy standing outside the door who would love to make $5 for carrying your plate 15 feet...) Have you bent over backwards for some customers, but received no tip, because you weren't in a "tipping business"? Better that the business pay the waiter (or whomever) the proper wages, charge the proper prices, and have all tips be entirely voluntary, like the tips jar at the cafe. </td> <td> <span>+</span> The rule-of-thumb is that one should [wiki:WikiPedia:Tipping tip] 15%. Others feel it should be less for poor service, and more for excellent service. In some countries, tipping is never done. Many establishments have all the workers pool their tips, and then divy them out again. Some industries have grown to expect tips (restaurants, hotel staff, etc.), yet others rarely get tips. Some think this is unfair. Why give $5 to a person just to deliver carry a plate 15 feet, when the mechanic who struggled (and cursed) for 30 minutes to replace your water pump doesn't get one? (Not to mention the homeless guy standing outside the door who would love to make $5 for carrying your plate 15 feet...) Have you bent over backwards for some customers, but received no tip, because you weren't in a "tipping business"? Better that the business pay the waiter (or whomever) the proper wages, charge the proper prices, and have all tips be entirely voluntary, like the tips jar at the cafe.<span>&nbsp;If people didn't tip, the employers would ''have'' to raise wages due to market forces.</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 5: </td> <td> Line 5: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- Just edit to add your pro/con feelings, etc. This page was started since it seemed to be a hot topic and seemed to deserve a page.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ The last word on tipping, from [http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0105236/quotes ''Reservoir Dogs'']:</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 7: </td> <td> Line 7: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- The last word on tipping, from [http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0105236/quotes ''Reservoir Dogs'']<br> - <br> - Nice Guy Eddie: C'mon, throw in a buck!</span> </td> <td> <span>+ {{{Nice Guy Eddie: C'mon, throw in a buck!</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 25: </td> <td> Line 23: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Nice Guy Eddie: Excuse me, Mr. Pink, but I think the last fucking thing you need is another cup of coffee. </td> <td> <span>+</span> Nice Guy Eddie: Excuse me, Mr. Pink, but I think the last fucking thing you need is another cup of coffee.<span>}}}<br> +</span> <span>--["ApolloStumpy"]</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 27: </td> <td> Line 26: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ == Mandatory service charges for large groups ==<br> + I think this is a reasonable policy. First, 15% gratuity is the minimum tip you should give provided the waitstaff doesn't majorly screw up. Second, most waitstaff get paid peanuts by the restaurant, and make their money primarily from tips. The 15% surcharge guarantees that the waitstaff get just compensation for a particularly heavy workload. If you disagree with these policies, you have these options (1) eat at McDonalds, (2) go to a foreign country where the waitstaff get decent salaries and never recieve tips, (3) complain to restaurant owners and tell them to raise the salaries of the waitstaff-- by simply holding back a tip, you're focussing your annoyance at the wrong people. That is, you exploit workers who are already exploited by their management. As for the 15% gratuity charge, if you feel that your party of 8 or more has not received adequate service, you're well within your right to complain to the management. Any restaurant in their right mind will waive the charge. Remember, you're the consumer and a restaurant would rather calm an upset customer than have their reputation smeared. ["CraigBrozinsky"]</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 28: </td> <td> Line 29: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- <br> - <br> - '''Places that you tip and how much:'''<br> - <br> - ["Starbucks"] - Just give them the change.<br> - <br> - [[Comments]]<br> - <br> - Re: mandatory gratuity for large groups ''I think this is a reasonable policy. First, 15% gratuity is the minimum tip you should give provided the waitstaff doesn't majorly screw up. Second, most waitstaff get paid peanuts by the restaurant, and make their money primarily from tips. The 15% surcharge guarantees that the waitstaff get just compensation for a particularly heavy workload. If you disagree with these policies, you have these options (1) eat at McDonalds, (2) go to a foreign country where the waitstaff get decent salaries and never recieve tips, (3) complain to restaurant owners and tell them to raise the salaries of the waitstaff-- by simply holding back a tip, you're focussing your annoyance at the wrong people. That is, you exploit workers who are already exploited by their management. As for the 15% gratuity charge, if you feel that your party of 8 or more has not received adequate service, you're well within your right to complain to the management. Any restaurant in their right mind will waive the charge. Remember, you're the consumer and a restaurant would rather calm an upset customer than have their reputation smeared. ["CraigBrozinsky"]''<br> - <br> - Re: mandatory gratuity for large groups ... ''If such policies were not in place the server would make less money than if the party weren't there. A big top takes more time to manage as a server, and the other tables in his/her section can suffer because of it, probably costing the server additional tips. Large groups are usually not paid for by a single individual, so in many groups there will usually be the one person in the group who will contribute less than their fair share. As a result a server would get a smaller tip because of the cheapskate in the group. A server is very likely to get more money off of 2 four tops than a single eight top. --["RogerClark"]''</span> </td> <td> <span>+ If such policies were not in place the server would make less money than if the party weren't there. A big top takes more time to manage as a server, and the other tables in his/her section can suffer because of it, probably costing the server additional tips. Large groups are usually not paid for by a single individual, so in many groups there will usually be the one person in the group who will contribute less than their fair share. As a result a server would get a smaller tip because of the cheapskate in the group. A server is very likely to get more money off of 2 four tops than a single eight top. --["RogerClark"]</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 42: </td> <td> Line 33: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> ''2005-09-15 15:07:33'' <span>[[nbsp]] </span>I think 15% for 8 or more is fair, but I disagree that the 12-15% range is usually considered the "right" amount to tip all waiters. I hate crappy waiters who don't deserve it. They don't get paid peanuts here in Davis. Yeah, it is legal to pay waiters less then minimum wage (as long as the amount of tips brings them to minimum wage), but no place in Davis does that. They all get at least minimum, most of them more. Tough job, this that, perhaps. But that doesn't warrant an automatic 15% just for doing thier job. Somewhere in the last year or two I've become bitter towards undeserving waitstaff. It's not exploitation. Just as I can go to McDonalds or a foreign country, I could argue they could get a different job. (For the record, I do tip. Usually double the tax and then make it an even number. But still.) /rant --["EdwinSaada"] </td> <td> <span>+</span> ''2005-09-15 15:07:33'' I think 15% for 8 or more is fair, but I disagree that the 12-15% range is usually considered the "right" amount to tip all waiters. I hate crappy waiters who don't deserve it. They don't get paid peanuts here in Davis. Yeah, it is legal to pay waiters less then minimum wage (as long as the amount of tips brings them to minimum wage), but no place in Davis does that. They all get at least minimum, most of them more. Tough job, this that, perhaps. But that doesn't warrant an automatic 15% just for doing thier job. Somewhere in the last year or two I've become bitter towards undeserving waitstaff. It's not exploitation. Just as I can go to McDonalds or a foreign country, I could argue they could get a different job. (For the record, I do tip. Usually double the tax and then make it an even number. But still.) /rant --["EdwinSaada"] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 45: </td> <td> Line 36: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- ''f</span>ixed gratuities for parties of 8 or more are used because quite often a waiter will be servicing only one table if it is 8 or more. no tip or a small tip could mean thats all they get for the night. tips are often taken into account when calculating how much a waiter makes in salary. to the comment that they are allready making a wad of money for having you eat there, the gratuity never goes to the restraunt but actually goes to the waiter. this practice usually is only reserved for upscale places. usually i tip well and if there is desent service 15% is less than what i give. my revenge is that if they put the charge i dont ad the extra 3% i would normally give. -["MattHh"]<span>''</span> </td> <td> <span>+ F</span>ixed gratuities for parties of 8 or more are used because quite often a waiter will be servicing only one table if it is 8 or more. no tip or a small tip could mean thats all they get for the night. tips are often taken into account when calculating how much a waiter makes in salary. to the comment that they are allready making a wad of money for having you eat there, the gratuity never goes to the restraunt but actually goes to the waiter. this practice usually is only reserved for upscale places. usually i tip well and if there is desent service 15% is less than what i give. my revenge is that if they put the charge i dont ad the extra 3% i would normally give. -["MattHh"] </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 47: </td> <td> Line 38: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- ------</span> </td> <td> <span>+ [[http://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/FAQ_TipsAndGratutities.htm Note] that these are considered the employer's property and not the employee's property. The employer may give the workers 10%, 5%, or nothing at all if they choose.<br> + <br> + == To tip flat 15% or according to service quality ==<br> + Variable argument: This may encourage the server to provide better service. Fixed argument: Perhaps the server is working as hard as they can, but just aren't any good. Their living costs are fixed (they can't pay less to their landlord for crappy service, can they?), so they should get the same regardless.<br> + </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 56: </td> <td> Line 51: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 57: </td> <td> Line 53: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- ------</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2005-10-28 11:46:05JessicaLuedtke <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 56: </td> <td> Line 56: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ * Some of these things (such as extras, how refills are handled, and extra charges) may be restaurant policy rather than good or bad service on the part of the individual server. Do you take this into account when determining the tip? --["JessicaLuedtke"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2005-10-28 10:32:54DomenicSantangelofixed comment <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 48: </td> <td> Line 48: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- ''2005-10-28 10:22:45'' [[nbsp]] Here's my practice: If I have no complaints about service (everything came out in a timely manner, server asked to refill drinks appropriately) then I double the tax and round up. If the service was bad (no drink refills, no 'how is everything? --["DomenicSantangelo"]</span> </td> <td> <span>+ ''2005-10-28 10:22:45'' [[nbsp]] Here's my practice: <br> + *If the service is excellent (refills are assumed and brought out in new glasses before I'm done with the drink I'm working on, food arrives hot and fresh, server comes back to make sure everything is alright) then I tip 20-25%. If the service is truly exeptional (bringing extras without being asked, being extra on-the-ball) I have been known to tip between 75-100% because it is exceptionally rare.<br> + *If I have no complaints about service (everything came out in a timely manner, server asked to refill drinks appropriately) then I double the tax and round up. <br> + *If the service was bad (no drink refills, no 'how is everything?', food comes out slowly with no update from the server), I drop the tip WAY down, usually to about 5%. <br> + *If the service was just terrible (extra charges for things I feel should have been free - like water, takes a long time to get seated and a long time to get the order taken even when the resteraunt is visibly slow, etc) I do not tip at all and I leave a note saying why if I didn't get a chance to tell the server in person.<br> + <br> + I consider the Tip to be a feedback mechanism. If I routinely tip the same amount, the server will never get any feedback. If I tip the same amount and give verbal feedback, the server will not listen because they know they get tipped the same amount anyway. Consequently, money speaks.<br> + --["DomenicSantangelo"]</span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 50: </td> <td> Line 57: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- ''2005-10-28 10:32:14'' [[nbsp]] fixed comment --["DomenicSantangelo"]</span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2005-10-28 10:32:14DomenicSantangeloComment added. <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 49: </td> <td> Line 49: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ------<br> + ''2005-10-28 10:32:14'' [[nbsp]] fixed comment --["DomenicSantangelo"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2005-10-28 10:22:45DomenicSantangeloComment added. <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 47: </td> <td> Line 47: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ------<br> + ''2005-10-28 10:22:45'' [[nbsp]] Here's my practice: If I have no complaints about service (everything came out in a timely manner, server asked to refill drinks appropriately) then I double the tax and round up. If the service was bad (no drink refills, no 'how is everything? --["DomenicSantangelo"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2005-10-28 05:02:58ApolloStumpy <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 7: </td> <td> Line 7: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- Places that you tip and how much:</span> </td> <td> <span>+ The last word on tipping, from [http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0105236/quotes ''Reservoir Dogs'']<br> + <br> + Nice Guy Eddie: C'mon, throw in a buck!<br> + Mr. Pink: Uh-uh, I don't tip.<br> + Nice Guy Eddie: You don't tip?<br> + Mr. Pink: Nah, I don't believe in it.<br> + Nice Guy Eddie: You don't believe in tipping?<br> + Mr. Blue: You know what these chicks make? They make shit.<br> + Mr. Pink: Don't give me that. She don't make enough money that she can quit.<br> + Nice Guy Eddie: I don't even know a fucking Jew who'd have the balls to say that. Let me get this straight: you don't ever tip?<br> + Mr. Pink: I don't tip because society says I have to. All right, if someone deserves a tip, if they really put forth an effort, I'll give them something a little something extra. But this tipping automatically, it's for the birds. As far as I'm concerned, they're just doing their job.<br> + Mr. Blue: Hey, our girl was nice.<br> + Mr. Pink: She was okay. She wasn't anything special.<br> + Mr. Blue: What's special? Take you in the back and suck your dick?<br> + Nice Guy Eddie: I'd go over twelve percent for that. <br> + Mr. Pink: Look, I ordered coffee. Now we've been here a long fucking time and she's only filled my cup three times. When I order coffee, I want it filled *six* times.<br> + Mr. Blonde: Six times. Well, what if she's too fucking busy?<br> + Mr. Pink: The words "too fucking busy" shouldn't be in a waitress's vocabulary.<br> + Nice Guy Eddie: Excuse me, Mr. Pink, but I think the last fucking thing you need is another cup of coffee. <br> + <br> + <br> + <br> + <br> + '''Places that you tip and how much:'''</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2005-10-27 22:25:08ApolloStumpy <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 6: </td> <td> Line 6: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ <br> + Places that you tip and how much:<br> + <br> + ["Starbucks"] - Just give them the change.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2005-09-17 15:43:06CraigBrozinskymoved tipping discussion from unethical business page <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 15: </td> <td> Line 15: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ ''2005-09-15 15:07:33'' [[nbsp]] I think 15% for 8 or more is fair, but I disagree that the 12-15% range is usually considered the "right" amount to tip all waiters. I hate crappy waiters who don't deserve it. They don't get paid peanuts here in Davis. Yeah, it is legal to pay waiters less then minimum wage (as long as the amount of tips brings them to minimum wage), but no place in Davis does that. They all get at least minimum, most of them more. Tough job, this that, perhaps. But that doesn't warrant an automatic 15% just for doing thier job. Somewhere in the last year or two I've become bitter towards undeserving waitstaff. It's not exploitation. Just as I can go to McDonalds or a foreign country, I could argue they could get a different job. (For the record, I do tip. Usually double the tax and then make it an even number. But still.) /rant --["EdwinSaada"]<br> + "Crappy waiters who don't deserve it" is kind of a loaded term. Service can be bad for one of two reasons. One, the server is incompetent, slow, or just neglects you. These folks should be given a low tip. There are also servers that bust their and are required to wait about two times as many tables as they should. If you give this latter group a crappy tip, the server is getting shat on by both the management and the customer. For situations where things are beyond the control of the server, I think it important to complain to the management, ask for some discount on your food, and give the server a reasonable tip. I did this the other night at ["Bistro 33"]. --["CraigBrozinsky"]<br> + <br> + ''fixed gratuities for parties of 8 or more are used because quite often a waiter will be servicing only one table if it is 8 or more. no tip or a small tip could mean thats all they get for the night. tips are often taken into account when calculating how much a waiter makes in salary. to the comment that they are allready making a wad of money for having you eat there, the gratuity never goes to the restraunt but actually goes to the waiter. this practice usually is only reserved for upscale places. usually i tip well and if there is desent service 15% is less than what i give. my revenge is that if they put the charge i dont ad the extra 3% i would normally give. -["MattHh"]''<br> + </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2005-09-16 16:02:19CraigBrozinskymoved from unethical business practices <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 5: </td> <td> Line 5: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ Just edit to add your pro/con feelings, etc. This page was started since it seemed to be a hot topic and seemed to deserve a page.<br> + <br> + [[Comments]]<br> + <br> + Re: mandatory gratuity for large groups ''I think this is a reasonable policy. First, 15% gratuity is the minimum tip you should give provided the waitstaff doesn't majorly screw up. Second, most waitstaff get paid peanuts by the restaurant, and make their money primarily from tips. The 15% surcharge guarantees that the waitstaff get just compensation for a particularly heavy workload. If you disagree with these policies, you have these options (1) eat at McDonalds, (2) go to a foreign country where the waitstaff get decent salaries and never recieve tips, (3) complain to restaurant owners and tell them to raise the salaries of the waitstaff-- by simply holding back a tip, you're focussing your annoyance at the wrong people. That is, you exploit workers who are already exploited by their management. As for the 15% gratuity charge, if you feel that your party of 8 or more has not received adequate service, you're well within your right to complain to the management. Any restaurant in their right mind will waive the charge. Remember, you're the consumer and a restaurant would rather calm an upset customer than have their reputation smeared. ["CraigBrozinsky"]''<br> + <br> + Re: mandatory gratuity for large groups ... ''If such policies were not in place the server would make less money than if the party weren't there. A big top takes more time to manage as a server, and the other tables in his/her section can suffer because of it, probably costing the server additional tips. Large groups are usually not paid for by a single individual, so in many groups there will usually be the one person in the group who will contribute less than their fair share. As a result a server would get a smaller tip because of the cheapskate in the group. A server is very likely to get more money off of 2 four tops than a single eight top. --["RogerClark"]''<br> + </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 6: </td> <td> Line 14: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- ------<br> - Just edit to add your pro/con feelings, etc. This page was started since it seemed to be a hot topic and seemed to deserve a page.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ </span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2005-09-16 10:46:43RogerClarkPoor comparison <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 5: </td> <td> Line 5: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- </span> </td> <td> <span>+ OK, my obsevation is on the poor comparison. A mechanic is paid for the parts AND the labor as 2 separate charges. At a restaurant food and service are combined into a single charge and are not as easy to separate. The other issue is that mechanics charge around $70-75/hr for labor. While that labor rate covers overhead as well as wages, I am sure a mechanic doesn't work for minimum wage. - ["RogerClark"]</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2005-09-16 09:18:36CraigBrozinskytipping laws <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 3: </td> <td> Line 3: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- On the other hand, many (especially those who work in service industries) like the system. Some can make a substantial income from tips.</span> </td> <td> <span>+ The state of California is generally respectful of employees rights, and provides a number of tipping related [http://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/FAQ_TipsAndGratutities.htm legal guidelines]. Independent of tips, all workers must servers receive minimum wage. Many (especially those who work in service industries) like this system because some can make a substantial income from tips.</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2005-09-15 22:00:45CarlMcCabewikipedia link <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> -<span>&nbsp;</span>T<span>he rule-of-thumb is that one should tip</span> 15%. Others feel it should be less for poor service, and more for excellent service. In some countries, tipping is never done. Many establishments have all the workers pool their tips, and then divy them out again. Some industries have grown to expect tips (restaurants, hotel staff, etc.), yet others rarely get tips. Some think this is unfair. Why give $5 to a person just to deliver carry a plate 15 feet, when the mechanic who struggled (and cursed) for 30 minutes to replace your water pump doesn't get one? (Not to mention the homeless guy standing outside the door who would love to make $5 for carrying your plate 15 feet...) Have you bent over backwards for some customers, but received no tip, because you weren't in a "tipping business"? Better that the business pay the waiter (or whomever) the proper wages, charge the proper prices, and have all tips be entirely voluntary, like the tips jar at the cafe. </td> <td> <span>+ The rule</span>-<span>of-thumb is that one should [wiki:WikiPedia:</span>T<span>ipping tip]</span> 15%. Others feel it should be less for poor service, and more for excellent service. In some countries, tipping is never done. Many establishments have all the workers pool their tips, and then divy them out again. Some industries have grown to expect tips (restaurants, hotel staff, etc.), yet others rarely get tips. Some think this is unfair. Why give $5 to a person just to deliver carry a plate 15 feet, when the mechanic who struggled (and cursed) for 30 minutes to replace your water pump doesn't get one? (Not to mention the homeless guy standing outside the door who would love to make $5 for carrying your plate 15 feet...) Have you bent over backwards for some customers, but received no tip, because you weren't in a "tipping business"? Better that the business pay the waiter (or whomever) the proper wages, charge the proper prices, and have all tips be entirely voluntary, like the tips jar at the cafe. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2005-09-15 18:52:08SteveDavisonAmelia: No, I just failed. Take a look now. <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> -<span>&nbsp;The rule I've heard</span> is that one should tip 15%. Others feel it should be less for poor service, and more for excellent service. In some countries, tipping is never done. Many establishments have all the workers pool their tips, and then divy them out again. Some industries have grown to expect tips (restaurants, hotel staff, etc.), yet others rarely get tips. Some think this is unfair. Why give $5 to a person just to deliver carry a plate 15 feet, when the mechanic who struggled (and cursed) for 30 minutes to replace your water pump doesn't get one? (Not to mention the homeless guy standing outside the door who would love to make $5 for carrying your plate 15 feet...) <span>I </span>k<span>now I</span>'<span>ve</span> b<span>ent over</span> b<span>ac</span>k<span>wards for some customers, but received no tip, because I wasn't in a "tipping business". I'd rather the business pay the waiter (or whomever) the proper wages, charge the proper prices, and have all tips be entirely voluntary, lik</span>e the tips jar at the cafe. </td> <td> <span>+ The rule</span>-<span>of-thumb</span> is that one should tip 15%. Others feel it should be less for poor service, and more for excellent service. In some countries, tipping is never done. Many establishments have all the workers pool their tips, and then divy them out again. Some industries have grown to expect tips (restaurants, hotel staff, etc.), yet others rarely get tips. Some think this is unfair. Why give $5 to a person just to deliver carry a plate 15 feet, when the mechanic who struggled (and cursed) for 30 minutes to replace your water pump doesn't get one? (Not to mention the homeless guy standing outside the door who would love to make $5 for carrying your plate 15 feet...) <span>Have you bent over bac</span>k<span>wards for some customers, but received no tip, because you weren</span>'<span>t in a "tipping</span> b<span>usiness"? Better that the</span> b<span>usiness pay the waiter (or whomever) the proper wages, charge the proper prices, and have all tips be entirely voluntary, li</span>ke the tips jar at the cafe. </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 7: </td> <td> Line 7: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>-</span> Just edit to add your pro/con feelings, etc. <span>I</span> <span>ju</span>s<span>t</span> started<span>&nbsp;this</span> since it seemed to be a hot topic and seemed to deserve a page.<span>&nbsp;The views here do not necessarily reflect the views of this author...</span> </td> <td> <span>+</span> Just edit to add your pro/con feelings, etc. <span>This</span> <span>page wa</span>s started since it seemed to be a hot topic and seemed to deserve a page. </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2005-09-15 17:54:14AmeliaCarlsonuse of 1st person should be attributed to the author, fix? <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 6: </td> <td> Line 6: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <span>- </span> </td> <td> </td> </tr> </table> </div> Tippinghttp://daviswiki.org/Tipping2005-09-15 16:38:12SteveDavisonTipping seems to be a hot topic, deserving of its own page. <div id="content" class="wikipage content"> Differences for Tipping<p><strong></strong></p><table> <tr> <td> <span> Deletions are marked with - . </span> </td> <td> <span> Additions are marked with +. </span> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> Line 1: </td> <td> Line 1: </td> </tr> <tr> <td> </td> <td> <span>+ The rule I've heard is that one should tip 15%. Others feel it should be less for poor service, and more for excellent service. In some countries, tipping is never done. Many establishments have all the workers pool their tips, and then divy them out again. Some industries have grown to expect tips (restaurants, hotel staff, etc.), yet others rarely get tips. Some think this is unfair. Why give $5 to a person just to deliver carry a plate 15 feet, when the mechanic who struggled (and cursed) for 30 minutes to replace your water pump doesn't get one? (Not to mention the homeless guy standing outside the door who would love to make $5 for carrying your plate 15 feet...) I know I've bent over backwards for some customers, but received no tip, because I wasn't in a "tipping business". I'd rather the business pay the waiter (or whomever) the proper wages, charge the proper prices, and have all tips be entirely voluntary, like the tips jar at the cafe.<br> + <br> + On the other hand, many (especially those who work in service industries) like the system. Some can make a substantial income from tips.<br> + <br> + <br> + <br> + ------<br> + Just edit to add your pro/con feelings, etc. I just started this since it seemed to be a hot topic and seemed to deserve a page. The views here do not necessarily reflect the views of this author...</span> </td> </tr> </table> </div>