US Bicycling Hall of Fame

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||$5 for adults, $3 for ages 6-12 and ages 62 and older, || ||$5 for adults, $3 for ages 6-12 and ages 62 and older & students, ||

outside.jpg

Location
303 B Street, corner of Third and B
Hours
Wednesday 4:00 PM-8:00 PM
Sat 10:00 AM-2:00 PM
Phone
(530) 341-3263
Web
[WWW]http://www.usbhof.org/
Admission
$5 for adults, $3 for ages 6-12 and ages 62 and older & students,
Free for ages 5 and under
Accepts: Cash, credit card, Davis Dollars
Established
April 24, 2010

The U.S. Bicycling Hall of Fame is housed in the former Teen Center, or Third and B, as of November 2009. It was formerly located in Somerville, New Jersey, and Davis was chosen as its new home for its renown as a bicycle-friendly city. Between this closing of the Teen Center and "The Ring" closing, there was some concern that Davis Teens would no longer have an outlet or safe haven and that summertime mischief could increase. Fortunately, a summer program for teens called [WWW]The Vault was created as a replacement in 2010. This new hang-out spot is at King High School.

The Hall of Fame had its grand opening on April 24, 2010. Admission was free for the first two weeks and it started charging admission on May 12th, 2010.

During January 2013, television news used the building as a backdrop to report on the Lance Armstrong doping scandal.

Mission: The U.S. Bicycling Hall of Fame is a 501c3 non-profit organization dedicated to recognizing American competitive cyclists and contributors to the sport for their significant achievements. Its mission is to preserve the history of American cycling in order to educate people about the past and encourage them to participate in the future of the sport. Encouraging all levels of cycling, the U.S. Bicycling Hall of Fame promotes cycling development and fitness.

Photos

IMG_1502.JPGGreg Lemond's jersey and bicycle from the 1990 Tour de France

Opening Day Crowd.JPGOpening day crowd The first bicycle fairing.JPGThe first faired bicycle in the United States. It allowed the bike next to it to set several bicycle speed records. This is one of the predecessors of all modern human powered vehicles (HPVs), such as those from the [WWW]UC Davis HPV team

Carbon fiber spider bike.JPGA one of a kind carbon fiber spider bike, hand made from carbon fiber strands in 2007

Running machine (1817-1860).JPGA "running machine" - a very uncomfortable looking predecessor to the bicycle, used between 1817 and 1860. Major Taylor, a world champion cyclist from the very late 1800's.JPGMajor Taylor, a world champion cyclist from the very late 1800's. He set world records in 1899, but left the sport due to racial discrimination. The highest paid athlete of his time, he lost his money in the 1929 stock market crash, and died of an illness in 1932.

Hall of fame inductees.JPGThe top floor is lined with about 100 plaques commemorating inductees into the Hall of Fame.

opening-day-usbhof.jpgCrowd enters after ribbon-cutting ceremony on opening day

Comments:

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2010-03-09 16:23:12   Does it ever open? —IDoNotExist


2010-03-09 18:37:28   I have yet to see it open. I also have yet to see it provide any kind of public interest. The only actual outcome I can see since it's being placed in the former Teen Center is a rise in adolescent crime (also due to the only other teen centers closing: the ring) —WesOne


2010-03-09 20:39:31   You can see in from the outside. They have bicycles. Wish I could get in...I never see those in Davis anywhere!

I did see some people having a wine and cheese thing there amongst the bicycles once. Since then, it hasn't been inhabited while I've been walking by. —IDoNotExist


2010-04-25 05:50:16   Wow.. love how they just kind of snuck in a Grand opening... It's almost as if they didn't even want people there.. I saw nothing at all in print or internet posts, heard nothing on the airwaves and saw nothing on the tube about this Grand Opening Event... What is the point of having a place in town that doesn't seem to actually want any visitors? —WesOne


2010-04-25 10:32:23   There were quite a lot of people there. It's also been listed on this page for months. ;-)

I was a bit disappointed by it though. The collection of old bikes that they have in the basement was interesting. They sort of have an exhibit on the history of the bicycle. But what they had was really incomplete. They could have had a lot more on improvements in cycle design since 1970 (especially advances in aerodynamics,materials, wheel design, clip pedals, seats, safety, etc.), but it was almost as if the last 40 years didn't really exist. There was nothing at all on helmet and clothing changes, which have been very important for comfort, safety, and aerodynamics. There was a little bit on racing - especially the history of the "Madison", and a little bit on early racers such as Major Taylor. But there was basically very little on the history of cycling as a sport beyond that. They are a bit space constrained on the top and bottom floors, but the ground floor was almost entirely empty. They had the display of Greg Lemond's bike and jersey (pictured above). But most of the rest of the floor was covered with a giant map of an upcoming race, rather than actual bikes, as I'd expected. I'd also thought that maybe they would have more of the bikes used by some of their hall of fame inductees (they did have two), and more information on the reasons that their inductees were inducted. (Their website has much more information on their accomplishments.) So not too bad, and interesting for about 45 minutes. But it really seemed incomplete in so many ways. Hopefully, they can fill in the gaps over time. —IDoNotExist

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